Speeches (Lines) for Nym in "The Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 13
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Slice, I say! pauca, pauca: slice! that's my humour.
  • Slice, I say! pauca, pauca: slice! that's my humour.
  • Slender. Ay, it is no matter.

    Nym. Slice, I say! pauca, pauca: slice! that's my humour.

2 I / 1
  • Be avised, sir, and pass good humours: I will say
    'marry trap' with you, if...
  • Be avised, sir, and pass good humours: I will say
    'marry trap' with you, if you run the nuthook's
    humour on me; that is the very note of it.
  • Slender. By these gloves, then, 'twas he.

    Nym. Be avised, sir, and pass good humours: I will say
    'marry trap' with you, if you run the nuthook's
    humour on me; that is the very note of it.

3 I / 3
  • He was gotten in drink: is not the humour conceited?
  • He was gotten in drink: is not the humour conceited?
  • Pistol. O base Hungarian wight! wilt thou the spigot wield?

    Nym. He was gotten in drink: is not the humour conceited?

4 I / 3
  • The good humour is to steal at a minute's rest.
  • The good humour is to steal at a minute's rest.
  • Falstaff. I am glad I am so acquit of this tinderbox: his
    thefts were too open; his filching was like an
    unskilful singer; he kept not time.

    Nym. The good humour is to steal at a minute's rest.

5 I / 3
  • The anchor is deep: will that humour pass?
  • The anchor is deep: will that humour pass?
  • Pistol. He hath studied her will, and translated her will,
    out of honesty into English.

    Nym. The anchor is deep: will that humour pass?

6 I / 3
  • The humour rises; it is good: humour me the angels.
  • The humour rises; it is good: humour me the angels.
  • Pistol. As many devils entertain; and 'To her, boy,' say I.

    Nym. The humour rises; it is good: humour me the angels.

7 I / 3
  • I thank thee for that humour.
  • I thank thee for that humour.
  • Pistol. Then did the sun on dunghill shine.

    Nym. I thank thee for that humour.

8 I / 3
  • I will run no base humour: here, take the
    humour-letter: I will keep the hav...
  • I will run no base humour: here, take the
    humour-letter: I will keep the havior of reputation.
  • Pistol. Shall I Sir Pandarus of Troy become,
    And by my side wear steel? then, Lucifer take all!

    Nym. I will run no base humour: here, take the
    humour-letter: I will keep the havior of reputation.

9 I / 3
  • I have operations which be humours of revenge.
  • I have operations which be humours of revenge.
  • Pistol. Let vultures gripe thy guts! for gourd and fullam holds,
    And high and low beguiles the rich and poor:
    Tester I'll have in pouch when thou shalt lack,
    Base Phrygian Turk!

    Nym. I have operations which be humours of revenge.

10 I / 3
  • By welkin and her star!
  • By welkin and her star!
  • Pistol. Wilt thou revenge?

    Nym. By welkin and her star!

11 I / 3
  • With both the humours, I:
    I will discuss the humour of this love to Page.
  • With both the humours, I:
    I will discuss the humour of this love to Page.
  • Pistol. With wit or steel?

    Nym. With both the humours, I:
    I will discuss the humour of this love to Page.

12 I / 3
  • My humour shall not cool: I will incense Page to
    deal with poison; I will po...
  • My humour shall not cool: I will incense Page to
    deal with poison; I will possess him with
    yellowness, for the revolt of mine is dangerous:
    that is my true humour.
  • Pistol. And I to Ford shall eke unfold
    How Falstaff, varlet vile,
    His dove will prove, his gold will hold,
    And his soft couch defile.

    Nym. My humour shall not cool: I will incense Page to
    deal with poison; I will possess him with
    yellowness, for the revolt of mine is dangerous:
    that is my true humour.

13 II / 1
  • [To PAGE] And this is true; I like not the humour
    of lying. He hath wronged...
  • [To PAGE] And this is true; I like not the humour
    of lying. He hath wronged me in some humours: I
    should have borne the humoured letter to her; but I
    have a sword and it shall bite upon my necessity.
    He loves your wife; there's the short and the long.
    My name is Corporal Nym; I speak and I avouch; 'tis
    true: my name is Nym and Falstaff loves your wife.
    Adieu. I love not the humour of bread and cheese,
    and there's the humour of it. Adieu.
  • Ford. [Aside] I will be patient; I will find out this.

    Nym. [To PAGE] And this is true; I like not the humour
    of lying. He hath wronged me in some humours: I
    should have borne the humoured letter to her; but I
    have a sword and it shall bite upon my necessity.
    He loves your wife; there's the short and the long.
    My name is Corporal Nym; I speak and I avouch; 'tis
    true: my name is Nym and Falstaff loves your wife.
    Adieu. I love not the humour of bread and cheese,
    and there's the humour of it. Adieu.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.