Speeches (Lines) for Osric in "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark"

Total: 25
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 V, 2, 3737
  • Your lordship is right welcome back to Denmark.
  • Your lordship is right welcome back to Denmark.
  • (stage directions). Enter young Osric, a courtier.

    Osric. Your lordship is right welcome back to Denmark.

2 V, 2, 3745
  • Sweet lord, if your lordship were at leisure, I should impart
    a thing to you...
  • Sweet lord, if your lordship were at leisure, I should impart
    a thing to you from his Majesty.
  • Hamlet. [aside to Horatio] Thy state is the more gracious; for 'tis a
    vice to know him. He hath much land, and fertile. Let a beast be
    lord of beasts, and his crib shall stand at the king's mess. 'Tis
    a chough; but, as I say, spacious in the possession of dirt.

    Osric. Sweet lord, if your lordship were at leisure, I should impart
    a thing to you from his Majesty.

3 V, 2, 3749
  • I thank your lordship, it is very hot.
  • I thank your lordship, it is very hot.
  • Hamlet. I will receive it, sir, with all diligence of spirit. Put your
    bonnet to his right use. 'Tis for the head.

    Osric. I thank your lordship, it is very hot.

4 V, 2, 3751
  • It is indifferent cold, my lord, indeed.
  • It is indifferent cold, my lord, indeed.
  • Hamlet. No, believe me, 'tis very cold; the wind is northerly.

    Osric. It is indifferent cold, my lord, indeed.

5 V, 2, 3753
  • Exceedingly, my lord; it is very sultry, as 'twere- I cannot
    tell how. But,...
  • Exceedingly, my lord; it is very sultry, as 'twere- I cannot
    tell how. But, my lord, his Majesty bade me signify to you that
    he has laid a great wager on your head. Sir, this is the matter-
  • Hamlet. But yet methinks it is very sultry and hot for my complexion.

    Osric. Exceedingly, my lord; it is very sultry, as 'twere- I cannot
    tell how. But, my lord, his Majesty bade me signify to you that
    he has laid a great wager on your head. Sir, this is the matter-

6 V, 2, 3758
  • Nay, good my lord; for mine ease, in good faith. Sir, here is
    newly come to...
  • Nay, good my lord; for mine ease, in good faith. Sir, here is
    newly come to court Laertes; believe me, an absolute gentleman,
    full of most excellent differences, of very soft society and
    great showing. Indeed, to speak feelingly of him, he is the card
    or calendar of gentry; for you shall find in him the continent of
    what part a gentleman would see.
  • (stage directions). [Hamlet moves him to put on his hat.]

    Osric. Nay, good my lord; for mine ease, in good faith. Sir, here is
    newly come to court Laertes; believe me, an absolute gentleman,
    full of most excellent differences, of very soft society and
    great showing. Indeed, to speak feelingly of him, he is the card
    or calendar of gentry; for you shall find in him the continent of
    what part a gentleman would see.

7 V, 2, 3770
  • Your lordship speaks most infallibly of him.
  • Your lordship speaks most infallibly of him.
  • Hamlet. Sir, his definement suffers no perdition in you; though, I
    know, to divide him inventorially would dozy th' arithmetic of
    memory, and yet but yaw neither in respect of his quick sail.
    But, in the verity of extolment, I take him to be a soul of great
    article, and his infusion of such dearth and rareness as, to make
    true diction of him, his semblable is his mirror, and who else would trace him, his umbrage, nothing more.

    Osric. Your lordship speaks most infallibly of him.

8 V, 2, 3773
  • Sir?
  • Sir?
  • Hamlet. The concernancy, sir? Why do we wrap the gentleman in our more
    rawer breath?

    Osric. Sir?

9 V, 2, 3777
  • Of Laertes?
  • Of Laertes?
  • Hamlet. What imports the nomination of this gentleman?

    Osric. Of Laertes?

10 V, 2, 3781
  • I know you are not ignorant-
  • I know you are not ignorant-
  • Hamlet. Of him, sir.

    Osric. I know you are not ignorant-

11 V, 2, 3784
  • You are not ignorant of what excellence Laertes is-
  • You are not ignorant of what excellence Laertes is-
  • Hamlet. I would you did, sir; yet, in faith, if you did, it would not
    much approve me. Well, sir?

    Osric. You are not ignorant of what excellence Laertes is-

12 V, 2, 3787
  • I mean, sir, for his weapon; but in the imputation laid on him
    by them, in h...
  • I mean, sir, for his weapon; but in the imputation laid on him
    by them, in his meed he's unfellowed.
  • Hamlet. I dare not confess that, lest I should compare with him in
    excellence; but to know a man well were to know himself.

    Osric. I mean, sir, for his weapon; but in the imputation laid on him
    by them, in his meed he's unfellowed.

13 V, 2, 3790
  • Rapier and dagger.
  • Rapier and dagger.
  • Hamlet. What's his weapon?

    Osric. Rapier and dagger.

14 V, 2, 3792
  • The King, sir, hath wager'd with him six Barbary horses;
    against the which h...
  • The King, sir, hath wager'd with him six Barbary horses;
    against the which he has impon'd, as I take it, six French
    rapiers and poniards, with their assigns, as girdle, hangers, and
    so. Three of the carriages, in faith, are very dear to fancy,
    very responsive to the hilts, most delicate carriages, and of
    very liberal conceit.
  • Hamlet. That's two of his weapons- but well.

    Osric. The King, sir, hath wager'd with him six Barbary horses;
    against the which he has impon'd, as I take it, six French
    rapiers and poniards, with their assigns, as girdle, hangers, and
    so. Three of the carriages, in faith, are very dear to fancy,
    very responsive to the hilts, most delicate carriages, and of
    very liberal conceit.

15 V, 2, 3801
  • The carriages, sir, are the hangers.
  • The carriages, sir, are the hangers.
  • Horatio. [aside to Hamlet] I knew you must be edified by the margent
    ere you had done.

    Osric. The carriages, sir, are the hangers.

16 V, 2, 3807
  • The King, sir, hath laid that, in a dozen passes between
    yourself and him, h...
  • The King, sir, hath laid that, in a dozen passes between
    yourself and him, he shall not exceed you three hits; he hath
    laid on twelve for nine, and it would come to immediate trial
    if your lordship would vouchsafe the answer.
  • Hamlet. The phrase would be more germane to the matter if we could
    carry cannon by our sides. I would it might be hangers till then.
    But on! Six Barbary horses against six French swords, their
    assigns, and three liberal-conceited carriages: that's the French
    bet against the Danish. Why is this all impon'd, as you call it?

    Osric. The King, sir, hath laid that, in a dozen passes between
    yourself and him, he shall not exceed you three hits; he hath
    laid on twelve for nine, and it would come to immediate trial
    if your lordship would vouchsafe the answer.

17 V, 2, 3812
  • I mean, my lord, the opposition of your person in trial.
  • I mean, my lord, the opposition of your person in trial.
  • Hamlet. How if I answer no?

    Osric. I mean, my lord, the opposition of your person in trial.

18 V, 2, 3818
  • Shall I redeliver you e'en so?
  • Shall I redeliver you e'en so?
  • Hamlet. Sir, I will walk here in the hall. If it please his Majesty,
    it is the breathing time of day with me. Let the foils be
    brought, the gentleman willing, and the King hold his purpose,
    I will win for him if I can; if not, I will gain nothing but my
    shame and the odd hits.

    Osric. Shall I redeliver you e'en so?

19 V, 2, 3820
  • I commend my duty to your lordship.
  • I commend my duty to your lordship.
  • Hamlet. To this effect, sir, after what flourish your nature will.

    Osric. I commend my duty to your lordship.

20 V, 2, 3909
  • Ay, my good lord.
  • Ay, my good lord.
  • (stage directions). Prepare to play.

    Osric. Ay, my good lord.

21 V, 2, 3928
  • A hit, a very palpable hit.
  • A hit, a very palpable hit.
  • Hamlet. Judgment!

    Osric. A hit, a very palpable hit.

22 V, 2, 3954
  • Nothing neither way.
  • Nothing neither way.
  • Laertes. Say you so? Come on. Play.

    Osric. Nothing neither way.

23 V, 2, 3959
  • Look to the Queen there, ho!
  • Look to the Queen there, ho!
  • Hamlet. Nay come! again! The Queen falls.

    Osric. Look to the Queen there, ho!

24 V, 2, 3961
  • How is't, Laertes?
  • How is't, Laertes?
  • Horatio. They bleed on both sides. How is it, my lord?

    Osric. How is't, Laertes?

25 V, 2, 4011
  • Young Fortinbras, with conquest come from Poland,
    To the ambassadors of Engl...
  • Young Fortinbras, with conquest come from Poland,
    To the ambassadors of England gives
    This warlike volley.
  • Hamlet. As th'art a man,
    Give me the cup. Let go! By heaven, I'll ha't.
    O good Horatio, what a wounded name
    (Things standing thus unknown) shall live behind me!
    If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart,
    Absent thee from felicity awhile,
    And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain,
    To tell my story. [March afar off, and shot within.]
    What warlike noise is this?

    Osric. Young Fortinbras, with conquest come from Poland,
    To the ambassadors of England gives
    This warlike volley.

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