Speeches (Lines) for Page in "History of Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 17
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • He said, sir, the water itself was a good healthy water;
    for the party that...
  • He said, sir, the water itself was a good healthy water;
    for the party that owed it, he might have moe diseases than
    knew for.
  • Falstaff. Sirrah, you giant, what says the doctor to my water?

    Page. He said, sir, the water itself was a good healthy water;
    for the party that owed it, he might have moe diseases than
    knew for.

2 I / 2
  • He said, sir, you should procure him better assurance
    Bardolph. He would not...
  • He said, sir, you should procure him better assurance
    Bardolph. He would not take his band and yours; he liked not
    security.
  • Falstaff. Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me. The
    this foolish-compounded clay, man, is not able to invent
    that intends to laughter, more than I invent or is invented
    me. I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is
    other men. I do here walk before thee like a sow that hath
    overwhelm'd all her litter but one. If the Prince put thee
    my service for any other reason than to set me off, why then
    have no judgment. Thou whoreson mandrake, thou art fitter to
    worn in my cap than to wait at my heels. I was never mann'd
    an agate till now; but I will inset you neither in gold nor
    silver, but in vile apparel, and send you back again to your
    master, for a jewel--the juvenal, the Prince your master,
    chin is not yet fledge. I will sooner have a beard grow in
    palm of my hand than he shall get one off his cheek; and yet
    will not stick to say his face is a face-royal. God may
    when he will, 'tis not a hair amiss yet. He may keep it still
    a face-royal, for a barber shall never earn sixpence out of
    and yet he'll be crowing as if he had writ man ever since his
    father was a bachelor. He may keep his own grace, but he's
    out of mine, I can assure him. What said Master Dommelton
    the satin for my short cloak and my slops?

    Page. He said, sir, you should procure him better assurance
    Bardolph. He would not take his band and yours; he liked not
    security.

3 I / 2
  • He's gone into Smithfield to buy your worship horse.
  • He's gone into Smithfield to buy your worship horse.
  • Falstaff. Let him be damn'd, like the Glutton; pray God his
    be hotter! A whoreson Achitophel! A rascal-yea-forsooth
    bear a gentleman in hand, and then stand upon security! The
    whoreson smooth-pates do now wear nothing but high shoes, and
    bunches of keys at their girdles; and if a man is through
    them in honest taking-up, then they must stand upon security.
    had as lief they would put ratsbane in my mouth as offer to
    it with security. I look'd 'a should have sent me two and
    yards of satin, as I am a true knight, and he sends me
    Well, he may sleep in security; for he hath the horn of
    abundance, and the lightness of his wife shines through it;
    yet cannot he see, though he have his own lanthorn to light
    Where's Bardolph?

    Page. He's gone into Smithfield to buy your worship horse.

4 I / 2
  • Sir, here comes the nobleman that committed the
    Prince for striking him abou...
  • Sir, here comes the nobleman that committed the
    Prince for striking him about Bardolph.
  • Falstaff. I bought him in Paul's, and he'll buy me a horse in
    Smithfield. An I could get me but a wife in the stews, I were
    mann'd, hors'd, and wiv'd.

    Page. Sir, here comes the nobleman that committed the
    Prince for striking him about Bardolph.

5 I / 2
  • You must speak louder; my master is deaf.
  • You must speak louder; my master is deaf.
  • Falstaff. Boy, tell him I am deaf.

    Page. You must speak louder; my master is deaf.

6 I / 2
  • Sir?
  • Sir?
  • Falstaff. If I do, fillip me with a three-man beetle. A man can
    more separate age and covetousness than 'a can part young
    and lechery; but the gout galls the one, and the pox pinches
    other; and so both the degrees prevent my curses. Boy!

    Page. Sir?

7 I / 2
  • Seven groats and two pence.
  • Seven groats and two pence.
  • Falstaff. What money is in my purse?

    Page. Seven groats and two pence.

8 II / 1
  • Away, you scullion! you rampallian! you fustilarian!
    I'll tickle your catast...
  • Away, you scullion! you rampallian! you fustilarian!
    I'll tickle your catastrophe.
  • Hostess Quickly. Good people, bring a rescue or two. Thou wot, wot
    thou wot, wot ta? Do, do, thou rogue! do, thou hemp-seed!

    Page. Away, you scullion! you rampallian! you fustilarian!
    I'll tickle your catastrophe.

9 II / 2
  • 'A calls me e'en now, my lord, through a red lattice, and
    could discern no p...
  • 'A calls me e'en now, my lord, through a red lattice, and
    could discern no part of his face from the window. At last I
    spied his eyes; and methought he had made two holes in the
    alewife's new petticoat, and so peep'd through.
  • Edward Poins. Come, you virtuous ass, you bashful fool, must you be
    blushing? Wherefore blush you now? What a maidenly
    are you become! Is't such a matter to get a pottle-pot's
    maidenhead?

    Page. 'A calls me e'en now, my lord, through a red lattice, and
    could discern no part of his face from the window. At last I
    spied his eyes; and methought he had made two holes in the
    alewife's new petticoat, and so peep'd through.

10 II / 2
  • Away, you rascally Althaea's dream, away!
  • Away, you rascally Althaea's dream, away!
  • Bardolph. Away, you whoreson upright rabbit, away!

    Page. Away, you rascally Althaea's dream, away!

11 II / 2
  • Marry, my lord, Althaea dreamt she was delivered of a
    firebrand; and therefo...
  • Marry, my lord, Althaea dreamt she was delivered of a
    firebrand; and therefore I call him her dream.
  • Henry V. Instruct us, boy; what dream, boy?

    Page. Marry, my lord, Althaea dreamt she was delivered of a
    firebrand; and therefore I call him her dream.

12 II / 2
  • Ephesians, my lord, of the old church.
  • Ephesians, my lord, of the old church.
  • Henry V. What company?

    Page. Ephesians, my lord, of the old church.

13 II / 2
  • None, my lord, but old Mistress Quickly and Mistress Doll
    Tearsheet.
  • None, my lord, but old Mistress Quickly and Mistress Doll
    Tearsheet.
  • Henry V. Sup any women with him?

    Page. None, my lord, but old Mistress Quickly and Mistress Doll
    Tearsheet.

14 II / 2
  • A proper gentlewoman, sir, and a kinswoman of my
  • A proper gentlewoman, sir, and a kinswoman of my
  • Henry V. What pagan may that be?

    Page. A proper gentlewoman, sir, and a kinswoman of my

15 II / 2
  • And for mine, sir, I will govern it.
  • And for mine, sir, I will govern it.
  • Bardolph. I have no tongue, sir.

    Page. And for mine, sir, I will govern it.

16 II / 4
  • Pray thee go down.
  • Pray thee go down.
  • Pistol. Not I! I tell thee what, Corporal Bardolph, I could
    her; I'll be reveng'd of her.

    Page. Pray thee go down.

17 II / 4
  • The music is come, sir.
  • The music is come, sir.
  • Doll Tearsheet. Do, an thou dar'st for thy heart. An thou dost, I'll
    thee between a pair of sheets.

    Page. The music is come, sir.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.