Speeches (Lines) for Pandarus in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 153
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 38
  • Will this gear ne'er be mended?
  • Will this gear ne'er be mended?
  • Troilus. Call here my varlet; I'll unarm again:
    Why should I war without the walls of Troy,
    That find such cruel battle here within?
    Each Trojan that is master of his heart,
    Let him to field; Troilus, alas! hath none.

    Pandarus. Will this gear ne'er be mended?

2 I, 1, 45
  • Well, I have told you enough of this: for my part,
    I'll not meddle nor make...
  • Well, I have told you enough of this: for my part,
    I'll not meddle nor make no further. He that will
    have a cake out of the wheat must needs tarry the grinding.
  • Troilus. The Greeks are strong and skilful to their strength,
    Fierce to their skill and to their fierceness valiant;
    But I am weaker than a woman's tear,
    Tamer than sleep, fonder than ignorance,
    Less valiant than the virgin in the night
    And skilless as unpractised infancy.

    Pandarus. Well, I have told you enough of this: for my part,
    I'll not meddle nor make no further. He that will
    have a cake out of the wheat must needs tarry the grinding.

3 I, 1, 49
  • Ay, the grinding; but you must tarry
    the bolting.
  • Ay, the grinding; but you must tarry
    the bolting.
  • Troilus. Have I not tarried?

    Pandarus. Ay, the grinding; but you must tarry
    the bolting.

4 I, 1, 52
  • Ay, the bolting, but you must tarry the leavening.
  • Ay, the bolting, but you must tarry the leavening.
  • Troilus. Have I not tarried?

    Pandarus. Ay, the bolting, but you must tarry the leavening.

5 I, 1, 54
  • Ay, to the leavening; but here's yet in the word
    'hereafter' the kneading, t...
  • Ay, to the leavening; but here's yet in the word
    'hereafter' the kneading, the making of the cake, the
    heating of the oven and the baking; nay, you must
    stay the cooling too, or you may chance to burn your lips.
  • Troilus. Still have I tarried.

    Pandarus. Ay, to the leavening; but here's yet in the word
    'hereafter' the kneading, the making of the cake, the
    heating of the oven and the baking; nay, you must
    stay the cooling too, or you may chance to burn your lips.

6 I, 1, 63
  • Well, she looked yesternight fairer than ever I saw
    her look, or any woman e...
  • Well, she looked yesternight fairer than ever I saw
    her look, or any woman else.
  • Troilus. Patience herself, what goddess e'er she be,
    Doth lesser blench at sufferance than I do.
    At Priam's royal table do I sit;
    And when fair Cressid comes into my thoughts,--
    So, traitor! 'When she comes!' When is she thence?

    Pandarus. Well, she looked yesternight fairer than ever I saw
    her look, or any woman else.

7 I, 1, 72
  • An her hair were not somewhat darker than Helen's--
    well, go to--there were...
  • An her hair were not somewhat darker than Helen's--
    well, go to--there were no more comparison between
    the women: but, for my part, she is my kinswoman; I
    would not, as they term it, praise her: but I would
    somebody had heard her talk yesterday, as I did. I
    will not dispraise your sister Cassandra's wit, but--
  • Troilus. I was about to tell thee:--when my heart,
    As wedged with a sigh, would rive in twain,
    Lest Hector or my father should perceive me,
    I have, as when the sun doth light a storm,
    Buried this sigh in wrinkle of a smile:
    But sorrow, that is couch'd in seeming gladness,
    Is like that mirth fate turns to sudden sadness.

    Pandarus. An her hair were not somewhat darker than Helen's--
    well, go to--there were no more comparison between
    the women: but, for my part, she is my kinswoman; I
    would not, as they term it, praise her: but I would
    somebody had heard her talk yesterday, as I did. I
    will not dispraise your sister Cassandra's wit, but--

8 I, 1, 94
  • I speak no more than truth.
  • I speak no more than truth.
  • Troilus. O Pandarus! I tell thee, Pandarus,--
    When I do tell thee, there my hopes lie drown'd,
    Reply not in how many fathoms deep
    They lie indrench'd. I tell thee I am mad
    In Cressid's love: thou answer'st 'she is fair;'
    Pour'st in the open ulcer of my heart
    Her eyes, her hair, her cheek, her gait, her voice,
    Handlest in thy discourse, O, that her hand,
    In whose comparison all whites are ink,
    Writing their own reproach, to whose soft seizure
    The cygnet's down is harsh and spirit of sense
    Hard as the palm of ploughman: this thou tell'st me,
    As true thou tell'st me, when I say I love her;
    But, saying thus, instead of oil and balm,
    Thou lay'st in every gash that love hath given me
    The knife that made it.

    Pandarus. I speak no more than truth.

9 I, 1, 96
  • Faith, I'll not meddle in't. Let her be as she is:
    if she be fair, 'tis the...
  • Faith, I'll not meddle in't. Let her be as she is:
    if she be fair, 'tis the better for her; an she be
    not, she has the mends in her own hands.
  • Troilus. Thou dost not speak so much.

    Pandarus. Faith, I'll not meddle in't. Let her be as she is:
    if she be fair, 'tis the better for her; an she be
    not, she has the mends in her own hands.

10 I, 1, 100
  • I have had my labour for my travail; ill-thought on of
    her and ill-thought o...
  • I have had my labour for my travail; ill-thought on of
    her and ill-thought on of you; gone between and
    between, but small thanks for my labour.
  • Troilus. Good Pandarus, how now, Pandarus!

    Pandarus. I have had my labour for my travail; ill-thought on of
    her and ill-thought on of you; gone between and
    between, but small thanks for my labour.

11 I, 1, 104
  • Because she's kin to me, therefore she's not so fair
    as Helen: an she were n...
  • Because she's kin to me, therefore she's not so fair
    as Helen: an she were not kin to me, she would be as
    fair on Friday as Helen is on Sunday. But what care
    I? I care not an she were a black-a-moor; 'tis all one to me.
  • Troilus. What, art thou angry, Pandarus? what, with me?

    Pandarus. Because she's kin to me, therefore she's not so fair
    as Helen: an she were not kin to me, she would be as
    fair on Friday as Helen is on Sunday. But what care
    I? I care not an she were a black-a-moor; 'tis all one to me.

12 I, 1, 109
  • I do not care whether you do or no. She's a fool to
    stay behind her father;...
  • I do not care whether you do or no. She's a fool to
    stay behind her father; let her to the Greeks; and so
    I'll tell her the next time I see her: for my part,
    I'll meddle nor make no more i' the matter.
  • Troilus. Say I she is not fair?

    Pandarus. I do not care whether you do or no. She's a fool to
    stay behind her father; let her to the Greeks; and so
    I'll tell her the next time I see her: for my part,
    I'll meddle nor make no more i' the matter.

13 I, 1, 114
  • Not I.
  • Not I.
  • Troilus. Pandarus,--

    Pandarus. Not I.

14 I, 1, 116
  • Pray you, speak no more to me: I will leave all as I
    found it, and there an...
  • Pray you, speak no more to me: I will leave all as I
    found it, and there an end.
  • Troilus. Sweet Pandarus,--

    Pandarus. Pray you, speak no more to me: I will leave all as I
    found it, and there an end.

15 I, 2, 196
  • What's that? what's that?
  • What's that? what's that?
  • Alexander. As may be in the world, lady.

    Pandarus. What's that? what's that?

16 I, 2, 198
  • Good morrow, cousin Cressid: what do you talk of?
    Good morrow, Alexander. Ho...
  • Good morrow, cousin Cressid: what do you talk of?
    Good morrow, Alexander. How do you, cousin? When
    were you at Ilium?
  • Cressida. Good morrow, uncle Pandarus.

    Pandarus. Good morrow, cousin Cressid: what do you talk of?
    Good morrow, Alexander. How do you, cousin? When
    were you at Ilium?

17 I, 2, 202
  • What were you talking of when I came? Was Hector
    armed and gone ere ye came...
  • What were you talking of when I came? Was Hector
    armed and gone ere ye came to Ilium? Helen was not
    up, was she?
  • Cressida. This morning, uncle.

    Pandarus. What were you talking of when I came? Was Hector
    armed and gone ere ye came to Ilium? Helen was not
    up, was she?

18 I, 2, 206
  • Even so: Hector was stirring early.
  • Even so: Hector was stirring early.
  • Cressida. Hector was gone, but Helen was not up.

    Pandarus. Even so: Hector was stirring early.

19 I, 2, 208
  • Was he angry?
  • Was he angry?
  • Cressida. That were we talking of, and of his anger.

    Pandarus. Was he angry?

20 I, 2, 210
  • True, he was so: I know the cause too: he'll lay
    about him to-day, I can tel...
  • True, he was so: I know the cause too: he'll lay
    about him to-day, I can tell them that: and there's
    Troilus will not come far behind him: let them take
    heed of Troilus, I can tell them that too.
  • Cressida. So he says here.

    Pandarus. True, he was so: I know the cause too: he'll lay
    about him to-day, I can tell them that: and there's
    Troilus will not come far behind him: let them take
    heed of Troilus, I can tell them that too.

21 I, 2, 215
  • Who, Troilus? Troilus is the better man of the two.
  • Who, Troilus? Troilus is the better man of the two.
  • Cressida. What, is he angry too?

    Pandarus. Who, Troilus? Troilus is the better man of the two.

22 I, 2, 217
  • What, not between Troilus and Hector? Do you know a
    man if you see him?
  • What, not between Troilus and Hector? Do you know a
    man if you see him?
  • Cressida. O Jupiter! there's no comparison.

    Pandarus. What, not between Troilus and Hector? Do you know a
    man if you see him?

23 I, 2, 220
  • Well, I say Troilus is Troilus.
  • Well, I say Troilus is Troilus.
  • Cressida. Ay, if I ever saw him before and knew him.

    Pandarus. Well, I say Troilus is Troilus.

24 I, 2, 222
  • No, nor Hector is not Troilus in some degrees.
  • No, nor Hector is not Troilus in some degrees.
  • Cressida. Then you say as I say; for, I am sure, he is not Hector.

    Pandarus. No, nor Hector is not Troilus in some degrees.

25 I, 2, 224
  • Himself! Alas, poor Troilus! I would he were.
  • Himself! Alas, poor Troilus! I would he were.
  • Cressida. 'Tis just to each of them; he is himself.

    Pandarus. Himself! Alas, poor Troilus! I would he were.

26 I, 2, 226
  • Condition, I had gone barefoot to India.
  • Condition, I had gone barefoot to India.
  • Cressida. So he is.

    Pandarus. Condition, I had gone barefoot to India.

27 I, 2, 228
  • Himself! no, he's not himself: would a' were
    himself! Well, the gods are abo...
  • Himself! no, he's not himself: would a' were
    himself! Well, the gods are above; time must friend
    or end: well, Troilus, well: I would my heart were
    in her body. No, Hector is not a better man than Troilus.
  • Cressida. He is not Hector.

    Pandarus. Himself! no, he's not himself: would a' were
    himself! Well, the gods are above; time must friend
    or end: well, Troilus, well: I would my heart were
    in her body. No, Hector is not a better man than Troilus.

28 I, 2, 233
  • He is elder.
  • He is elder.
  • Cressida. Excuse me.

    Pandarus. He is elder.

29 I, 2, 235
  • Th' other's not come to't; you shall tell me another
    tale, when th' other's...
  • Th' other's not come to't; you shall tell me another
    tale, when th' other's come to't. Hector shall not
    have his wit this year.
  • Cressida. Pardon me, pardon me.

    Pandarus. Th' other's not come to't; you shall tell me another
    tale, when th' other's come to't. Hector shall not
    have his wit this year.

30 I, 2, 239
  • Nor his qualities.
  • Nor his qualities.
  • Cressida. He shall not need it, if he have his own.

    Pandarus. Nor his qualities.

31 I, 2, 241
  • Nor his beauty.
  • Nor his beauty.
  • Cressida. No matter.

    Pandarus. Nor his beauty.

32 I, 2, 243
  • You have no judgment, niece: Helen
    herself swore th' other day, that Troilus...
  • You have no judgment, niece: Helen
    herself swore th' other day, that Troilus, for
    a brown favour--for so 'tis, I must confess,--
    not brown neither,--
  • Cressida. 'Twould not become him; his own's better.

    Pandarus. You have no judgment, niece: Helen
    herself swore th' other day, that Troilus, for
    a brown favour--for so 'tis, I must confess,--
    not brown neither,--

33 I, 2, 248
  • 'Faith, to say truth, brown and not brown.
  • 'Faith, to say truth, brown and not brown.
  • Cressida. No, but brown.

    Pandarus. 'Faith, to say truth, brown and not brown.

34 I, 2, 250
  • She praised his complexion above Paris.
  • She praised his complexion above Paris.
  • Cressida. To say the truth, true and not true.

    Pandarus. She praised his complexion above Paris.

35 I, 2, 252
  • So he has.
  • So he has.
  • Cressida. Why, Paris hath colour enough.

    Pandarus. So he has.

36 I, 2, 259
  • I swear to you. I think Helen loves him better than Paris.
  • I swear to you. I think Helen loves him better than Paris.
  • Cressida. Then Troilus should have too much: if she praised
    him above, his complexion is higher than his; he
    having colour enough, and the other higher, is too
    flaming a praise for a good complexion. I had as
    lief Helen's golden tongue had commended Troilus for
    a copper nose.

    Pandarus. I swear to you. I think Helen loves him better than Paris.

37 I, 2, 261
  • Nay, I am sure she does. She came to him th' other
    day into the compassed wi...
  • Nay, I am sure she does. She came to him th' other
    day into the compassed window,--and, you know, he
    has not past three or four hairs on his chin,--
  • Cressida. Then she's a merry Greek indeed.

    Pandarus. Nay, I am sure she does. She came to him th' other
    day into the compassed window,--and, you know, he
    has not past three or four hairs on his chin,--

38 I, 2, 266
  • Why, he is very young: and yet will he, within
    three pound, lift as much as...
  • Why, he is very young: and yet will he, within
    three pound, lift as much as his brother Hector.
  • Cressida. Indeed, a tapster's arithmetic may soon bring his
    particulars therein to a total.

    Pandarus. Why, he is very young: and yet will he, within
    three pound, lift as much as his brother Hector.

39 I, 2, 269
  • But to prove to you that Helen loves him: she came
    and puts me her white han...
  • But to prove to you that Helen loves him: she came
    and puts me her white hand to his cloven chin--
  • Cressida. Is he so young a man and so old a lifter?

    Pandarus. But to prove to you that Helen loves him: she came
    and puts me her white hand to his cloven chin--

40 I, 2, 272
  • Why, you know 'tis dimpled: I think his smiling
    becomes him better than any...
  • Why, you know 'tis dimpled: I think his smiling
    becomes him better than any man in all Phrygia.
  • Cressida. Juno have mercy! how came it cloven?

    Pandarus. Why, you know 'tis dimpled: I think his smiling
    becomes him better than any man in all Phrygia.

41 I, 2, 275
  • Does he not?
  • Does he not?
  • Cressida. O, he smiles valiantly.

    Pandarus. Does he not?

42 I, 2, 277
  • Why, go to, then: but to prove to you that Helen
    loves Troilus,--
  • Why, go to, then: but to prove to you that Helen
    loves Troilus,--
  • Cressida. O yes, an 'twere a cloud in autumn.

    Pandarus. Why, go to, then: but to prove to you that Helen
    loves Troilus,--

43 I, 2, 281
  • Troilus! why, he esteems her no more than I esteem
    an addle egg.
  • Troilus! why, he esteems her no more than I esteem
    an addle egg.
  • Cressida. Troilus will stand to the proof, if you'll
    prove it so.

    Pandarus. Troilus! why, he esteems her no more than I esteem
    an addle egg.

44 I, 2, 285
  • I cannot choose but laugh, to think how she tickled
    his chin: indeed, she ha...
  • I cannot choose but laugh, to think how she tickled
    his chin: indeed, she has a marvellous white hand, I
    must needs confess,--
  • Cressida. If you love an addle egg as well as you love an idle
    head, you would eat chickens i' the shell.

    Pandarus. I cannot choose but laugh, to think how she tickled
    his chin: indeed, she has a marvellous white hand, I
    must needs confess,--

45 I, 2, 289
  • And she takes upon her to spy a white hair on his chin.
  • And she takes upon her to spy a white hair on his chin.
  • Cressida. Without the rack.

    Pandarus. And she takes upon her to spy a white hair on his chin.

46 I, 2, 291
  • But there was such laughing! Queen Hecuba laughed
    that her eyes ran o'er.
  • But there was such laughing! Queen Hecuba laughed
    that her eyes ran o'er.
  • Cressida. Alas, poor chin! many a wart is richer.

    Pandarus. But there was such laughing! Queen Hecuba laughed
    that her eyes ran o'er.

47 I, 2, 294
  • And Cassandra laughed.
  • And Cassandra laughed.
  • Cressida. With mill-stones.

    Pandarus. And Cassandra laughed.

48 I, 2, 297
  • And Hector laughed.
  • And Hector laughed.
  • Cressida. But there was more temperate fire under the pot of
    her eyes: did her eyes run o'er too?

    Pandarus. And Hector laughed.

49 I, 2, 299
  • Marry, at the white hair that Helen spied on Troilus' chin.
  • Marry, at the white hair that Helen spied on Troilus' chin.
  • Cressida. At what was all this laughing?

    Pandarus. Marry, at the white hair that Helen spied on Troilus' chin.

50 I, 2, 302
  • They laughed not so much at the hair as at his pretty answer.
  • They laughed not so much at the hair as at his pretty answer.
  • Cressida. An't had been a green hair, I should have laughed
    too.

    Pandarus. They laughed not so much at the hair as at his pretty answer.

51 I, 2, 304
  • Quoth she, 'Here's but two and fifty hairs on your
    chin, and one of them is...
  • Quoth she, 'Here's but two and fifty hairs on your
    chin, and one of them is white.
  • Cressida. What was his answer?

    Pandarus. Quoth she, 'Here's but two and fifty hairs on your
    chin, and one of them is white.

52 I, 2, 307
  • That's true; make no question of that. 'Two and
    fifty hairs' quoth he, 'and...
  • That's true; make no question of that. 'Two and
    fifty hairs' quoth he, 'and one white: that white
    hair is my father, and all the rest are his sons.'
    'Jupiter!' quoth she, 'which of these hairs is Paris,
    my husband? 'The forked one,' quoth he, 'pluck't
    out, and give it him.' But there was such laughing!
    and Helen so blushed, an Paris so chafed, and all the
    rest so laughed, that it passed.
  • Cressida. This is her question.

    Pandarus. That's true; make no question of that. 'Two and
    fifty hairs' quoth he, 'and one white: that white
    hair is my father, and all the rest are his sons.'
    'Jupiter!' quoth she, 'which of these hairs is Paris,
    my husband? 'The forked one,' quoth he, 'pluck't
    out, and give it him.' But there was such laughing!
    and Helen so blushed, an Paris so chafed, and all the
    rest so laughed, that it passed.

53 I, 2, 316
  • Well, cousin. I told you a thing yesterday; think on't.
  • Well, cousin. I told you a thing yesterday; think on't.
  • Cressida. So let it now; for it has been while going by.

    Pandarus. Well, cousin. I told you a thing yesterday; think on't.

54 I, 2, 318
  • I'll be sworn 'tis true; he will weep you, an 'twere
    a man born in April.
  • I'll be sworn 'tis true; he will weep you, an 'twere
    a man born in April.
  • Cressida. So I do.

    Pandarus. I'll be sworn 'tis true; he will weep you, an 'twere
    a man born in April.

55 I, 2, 323
  • Hark! they are coming from the field: shall we
    stand up here, and see them a...
  • Hark! they are coming from the field: shall we
    stand up here, and see them as they pass toward
    Ilium? good niece, do, sweet niece Cressida.
  • (stage directions). [A retreat sounded]

    Pandarus. Hark! they are coming from the field: shall we
    stand up here, and see them as they pass toward
    Ilium? good niece, do, sweet niece Cressida.

56 I, 2, 327
  • Here, here, here's an excellent place; here we may
    see most bravely: I'll te...
  • Here, here, here's an excellent place; here we may
    see most bravely: I'll tell you them all by their
    names as they pass by; but mark Troilus above the rest.
  • Cressida. At your pleasure.

    Pandarus. Here, here, here's an excellent place; here we may
    see most bravely: I'll tell you them all by their
    names as they pass by; but mark Troilus above the rest.

57 I, 2, 332
  • That's AEneas: is not that a brave man? he's one of
    the flowers of Troy, I c...
  • That's AEneas: is not that a brave man? he's one of
    the flowers of Troy, I can tell you: but mark
    Troilus; you shall see anon.
  • (stage directions). [AENEAS passes]

    Pandarus. That's AEneas: is not that a brave man? he's one of
    the flowers of Troy, I can tell you: but mark
    Troilus; you shall see anon.

58 I, 2, 337
  • That's Antenor: he has a shrewd wit, I can tell you;
    and he's a man good eno...
  • That's Antenor: he has a shrewd wit, I can tell you;
    and he's a man good enough, he's one o' the soundest
    judgments in whosoever, and a proper man of person.
    When comes Troilus? I'll show you Troilus anon: if
    he see me, you shall see him nod at me.
  • Cressida. Who's that?

    Pandarus. That's Antenor: he has a shrewd wit, I can tell you;
    and he's a man good enough, he's one o' the soundest
    judgments in whosoever, and a proper man of person.
    When comes Troilus? I'll show you Troilus anon: if
    he see me, you shall see him nod at me.

59 I, 2, 343
  • You shall see.
  • You shall see.
  • Cressida. Will he give you the nod?

    Pandarus. You shall see.

60 I, 2, 346
  • That's Hector, that, that, look you, that; there's a
    fellow! Go thy way, Hec...
  • That's Hector, that, that, look you, that; there's a
    fellow! Go thy way, Hector! There's a brave man,
    niece. O brave Hector! Look how he looks! there's
    a countenance! is't not a brave man?
  • (stage directions). [HECTOR passes]

    Pandarus. That's Hector, that, that, look you, that; there's a
    fellow! Go thy way, Hector! There's a brave man,
    niece. O brave Hector! Look how he looks! there's
    a countenance! is't not a brave man?

61 I, 2, 351
  • Is a' not? it does a man's heart good. Look you
    what hacks are on his helmet...
  • Is a' not? it does a man's heart good. Look you
    what hacks are on his helmet! look you yonder, do
    you see? look you there: there's no jesting;
    there's laying on, take't off who will, as they say:
    there be hacks!
  • Cressida. O, a brave man!

    Pandarus. Is a' not? it does a man's heart good. Look you
    what hacks are on his helmet! look you yonder, do
    you see? look you there: there's no jesting;
    there's laying on, take't off who will, as they say:
    there be hacks!

62 I, 2, 357
  • Swords! any thing, he cares not; an the devil come
    to him, it's all one: by...
  • Swords! any thing, he cares not; an the devil come
    to him, it's all one: by God's lid, it does one's
    heart good. Yonder comes Paris, yonder comes Paris.
    [PARIS passes]
    Look ye yonder, niece; is't not a gallant man too,
    is't not? Why, this is brave now. Who said he came
    hurt home to-day? he's not hurt: why, this will do
    Helen's heart good now, ha! Would I could see
    Troilus now! You shall see Troilus anon.
  • Cressida. Be those with swords?

    Pandarus. Swords! any thing, he cares not; an the devil come
    to him, it's all one: by God's lid, it does one's
    heart good. Yonder comes Paris, yonder comes Paris.
    [PARIS passes]
    Look ye yonder, niece; is't not a gallant man too,
    is't not? Why, this is brave now. Who said he came
    hurt home to-day? he's not hurt: why, this will do
    Helen's heart good now, ha! Would I could see
    Troilus now! You shall see Troilus anon.

63 I, 2, 368
  • That's Helenus. I marvel where Troilus is. That's
    Helenus. I think he went n...
  • That's Helenus. I marvel where Troilus is. That's
    Helenus. I think he went not forth to-day. That's Helenus.
  • Cressida. Who's that?

    Pandarus. That's Helenus. I marvel where Troilus is. That's
    Helenus. I think he went not forth to-day. That's Helenus.

64 I, 2, 371
  • Helenus? no. Yes, he'll fight indifferent well. I
    marvel where Troilus is. H...
  • Helenus? no. Yes, he'll fight indifferent well. I
    marvel where Troilus is. Hark! do you not hear the
    people cry 'Troilus'? Helenus is a priest.
  • Cressida. Can Helenus fight, uncle?

    Pandarus. Helenus? no. Yes, he'll fight indifferent well. I
    marvel where Troilus is. Hark! do you not hear the
    people cry 'Troilus'? Helenus is a priest.

65 I, 2, 376
  • Where? yonder? that's Deiphobus. 'Tis Troilus!
    there's a man, niece! Hem! Br...
  • Where? yonder? that's Deiphobus. 'Tis Troilus!
    there's a man, niece! Hem! Brave Troilus! the
    prince of chivalry!
  • (stage directions). [TROILUS passes]

    Pandarus. Where? yonder? that's Deiphobus. 'Tis Troilus!
    there's a man, niece! Hem! Brave Troilus! the
    prince of chivalry!

66 I, 2, 380
  • Mark him; note him. O brave Troilus! Look well upon
    him, niece: look you how...
  • Mark him; note him. O brave Troilus! Look well upon
    him, niece: look you how his sword is bloodied, and
    his helm more hacked than Hector's, and how he looks,
    and how he goes! O admirable youth! he ne'er saw
    three and twenty. Go thy way, Troilus, go thy way!
    Had I a sister were a grace, or a daughter a goddess,
    he should take his choice. O admirable man! Paris?
    Paris is dirt to him; and, I warrant, Helen, to
    change, would give an eye to boot.
  • Cressida. Peace, for shame, peace!

    Pandarus. Mark him; note him. O brave Troilus! Look well upon
    him, niece: look you how his sword is bloodied, and
    his helm more hacked than Hector's, and how he looks,
    and how he goes! O admirable youth! he ne'er saw
    three and twenty. Go thy way, Troilus, go thy way!
    Had I a sister were a grace, or a daughter a goddess,
    he should take his choice. O admirable man! Paris?
    Paris is dirt to him; and, I warrant, Helen, to
    change, would give an eye to boot.

67 I, 2, 391
  • Asses, fools, dolts! chaff and bran, chaff and bran!
    porridge after meat! I...
  • Asses, fools, dolts! chaff and bran, chaff and bran!
    porridge after meat! I could live and die i' the
    eyes of Troilus. Ne'er look, ne'er look: the eagles
    are gone: crows and daws, crows and daws! I had
    rather be such a man as Troilus than Agamemnon and
    all Greece.
  • (stage directions). [Forces pass]

    Pandarus. Asses, fools, dolts! chaff and bran, chaff and bran!
    porridge after meat! I could live and die i' the
    eyes of Troilus. Ne'er look, ne'er look: the eagles
    are gone: crows and daws, crows and daws! I had
    rather be such a man as Troilus than Agamemnon and
    all Greece.

68 I, 2, 398
  • Achilles! a drayman, a porter, a very camel.
  • Achilles! a drayman, a porter, a very camel.
  • Cressida. There is among the Greeks Achilles, a better man than Troilus.

    Pandarus. Achilles! a drayman, a porter, a very camel.

69 I, 2, 400
  • 'Well, well!' why, have you any discretion? have
    you any eyes? Do you know w...
  • 'Well, well!' why, have you any discretion? have
    you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is not
    birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood,
    learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality,
    and such like, the spice and salt that season a man?
  • Cressida. Well, well.

    Pandarus. 'Well, well!' why, have you any discretion? have
    you any eyes? Do you know what a man is? Is not
    birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, manhood,
    learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality,
    and such like, the spice and salt that season a man?

70 I, 2, 407
  • You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward you
    lie.
  • You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward you
    lie.
  • Cressida. Ay, a minced man: and then to be baked with no date
    in the pie, for then the man's date's out.

    Pandarus. You are such a woman! one knows not at what ward you
    lie.

71 I, 2, 414
  • Say one of your watches.
  • Say one of your watches.
  • Cressida. Upon my back, to defend my belly; upon my wit, to
    defend my wiles; upon my secrecy, to defend mine
    honesty; my mask, to defend my beauty; and you, to
    defend all these: and at all these wards I lie, at a
    thousand watches.

    Pandarus. Say one of your watches.

72 I, 2, 420
  • You are such another!
  • You are such another!
  • Cressida. Nay, I'll watch you for that; and that's one of the
    chiefest of them too: if I cannot ward what I would
    not have hit, I can watch you for telling how I took
    the blow; unless it swell past hiding, and then it's
    past watching.

    Pandarus. You are such another!

73 I, 2, 423
  • Where?
  • Where?
  • Boy. Sir, my lord would instantly speak with you.

    Pandarus. Where?

74 I, 2, 425
  • Good boy, tell him I come.
    [Exit boy]
    I doubt he be hurt. Fare ye well,...
  • Good boy, tell him I come.
    [Exit boy]
    I doubt he be hurt. Fare ye well, good niece.
  • Boy. At your own house; there he unarms him.

    Pandarus. Good boy, tell him I come.
    [Exit boy]
    I doubt he be hurt. Fare ye well, good niece.

75 I, 2, 429
  • I'll be with you, niece, by and by.
  • I'll be with you, niece, by and by.
  • Cressida. Adieu, uncle.

    Pandarus. I'll be with you, niece, by and by.

76 I, 2, 431
  • Ay, a token from Troilus.
  • Ay, a token from Troilus.
  • Cressida. To bring, uncle?

    Pandarus. Ay, a token from Troilus.

77 III, 1, 1493
  • Friend, you! pray you, a word: do not you follow
    the young Lord Paris?
  • Friend, you! pray you, a word: do not you follow
    the young Lord Paris?
  • (stage directions). [Enter a Servant and PANDARUS]

    Pandarus. Friend, you! pray you, a word: do not you follow
    the young Lord Paris?

78 III, 1, 1496
  • You depend upon him, I mean?
  • You depend upon him, I mean?
  • Servant. Ay, sir, when he goes before me.

    Pandarus. You depend upon him, I mean?

79 III, 1, 1498
  • You depend upon a noble gentleman; I must needs
    praise him.
  • You depend upon a noble gentleman; I must needs
    praise him.
  • Servant. Sir, I do depend upon the lord.

    Pandarus. You depend upon a noble gentleman; I must needs
    praise him.

80 III, 1, 1501
  • You know me, do you not?
  • You know me, do you not?
  • Servant. The lord be praised!

    Pandarus. You know me, do you not?

81 III, 1, 1503
  • Friend, know me better; I am the Lord Pandarus.
  • Friend, know me better; I am the Lord Pandarus.
  • Servant. Faith, sir, superficially.

    Pandarus. Friend, know me better; I am the Lord Pandarus.

82 III, 1, 1505
  • I do desire it.
  • I do desire it.
  • Servant. I hope I shall know your honour better.

    Pandarus. I do desire it.

83 III, 1, 1507
  • Grace! not so, friend: honour and lordship are my titles.
    [Music within]
  • Grace! not so, friend: honour and lordship are my titles.
    [Music within]
    What music is this?
  • Servant. You are in the state of grace.

    Pandarus. Grace! not so, friend: honour and lordship are my titles.
    [Music within]
    What music is this?

84 III, 1, 1511
  • Know you the musicians?
  • Know you the musicians?
  • Servant. I do but partly know, sir: it is music in parts.

    Pandarus. Know you the musicians?

85 III, 1, 1513
  • Who play they to?
  • Who play they to?
  • Servant. Wholly, sir.

    Pandarus. Who play they to?

86 III, 1, 1515
  • At whose pleasure, friend
  • At whose pleasure, friend
  • Servant. To the hearers, sir.

    Pandarus. At whose pleasure, friend

87 III, 1, 1517
  • Command, I mean, friend.
  • Command, I mean, friend.
  • Servant. At mine, sir, and theirs that love music.

    Pandarus. Command, I mean, friend.

88 III, 1, 1519
  • Friend, we understand not one another: I am too
    courtly and thou art too cun...
  • Friend, we understand not one another: I am too
    courtly and thou art too cunning. At whose request
    do these men play?
  • Servant. Who shall I command, sir?

    Pandarus. Friend, we understand not one another: I am too
    courtly and thou art too cunning. At whose request
    do these men play?

89 III, 1, 1526
  • Who, my cousin Cressida?
  • Who, my cousin Cressida?
  • Servant. That's to 't indeed, sir: marry, sir, at the request
    of Paris my lord, who's there in person; with him,
    the mortal Venus, the heart-blood of beauty, love's
    invisible soul,--

    Pandarus. Who, my cousin Cressida?

90 III, 1, 1529
  • It should seem, fellow, that thou hast not seen the
    Lady Cressida. I come to...
  • It should seem, fellow, that thou hast not seen the
    Lady Cressida. I come to speak with Paris from the
    Prince Troilus: I will make a complimental assault
    upon him, for my business seethes.
  • Servant. No, sir, Helen: could you not find out that by her
    attributes?

    Pandarus. It should seem, fellow, that thou hast not seen the
    Lady Cressida. I come to speak with Paris from the
    Prince Troilus: I will make a complimental assault
    upon him, for my business seethes.

91 III, 1, 1535
  • Fair be to you, my lord, and to all this fair
    company! fair desires, in all...
  • Fair be to you, my lord, and to all this fair
    company! fair desires, in all fair measure,
    fairly guide them! especially to you, fair queen!
    fair thoughts be your fair pillow!
  • (stage directions). [Enter PARIS and HELEN, attended]

    Pandarus. Fair be to you, my lord, and to all this fair
    company! fair desires, in all fair measure,
    fairly guide them! especially to you, fair queen!
    fair thoughts be your fair pillow!

92 III, 1, 1540
  • You speak your fair pleasure, sweet queen. Fair
    prince, here is good broken...
  • You speak your fair pleasure, sweet queen. Fair
    prince, here is good broken music.
  • Helen. Dear lord, you are full of fair words.

    Pandarus. You speak your fair pleasure, sweet queen. Fair
    prince, here is good broken music.

93 III, 1, 1546
  • Truly, lady, no.
  • Truly, lady, no.
  • Paris. You have broke it, cousin: and, by my life, you
    shall make it whole again; you shall piece it out
    with a piece of your performance. Nell, he is full
    of harmony.

    Pandarus. Truly, lady, no.

94 III, 1, 1548
  • Rude, in sooth; in good sooth, very rude.
  • Rude, in sooth; in good sooth, very rude.
  • Helen. O, sir,--

    Pandarus. Rude, in sooth; in good sooth, very rude.

95 III, 1, 1550
  • I have business to my lord, dear queen. My lord,
    will you vouchsafe me a wor...
  • I have business to my lord, dear queen. My lord,
    will you vouchsafe me a word?
  • Paris. Well said, my lord! well, you say so in fits.

    Pandarus. I have business to my lord, dear queen. My lord,
    will you vouchsafe me a word?

96 III, 1, 1554
  • Well, sweet queen. you are pleasant with me. But,
    marry, thus, my lord: my d...
  • Well, sweet queen. you are pleasant with me. But,
    marry, thus, my lord: my dear lord and most esteemed
    friend, your brother Troilus,--
  • Helen. Nay, this shall not hedge us out: we'll hear you
    sing, certainly.

    Pandarus. Well, sweet queen. you are pleasant with me. But,
    marry, thus, my lord: my dear lord and most esteemed
    friend, your brother Troilus,--

97 III, 1, 1558
  • Go to, sweet queen, to go:--commends himself most
    affectionately to you,--
  • Go to, sweet queen, to go:--commends himself most
    affectionately to you,--
  • Helen. My Lord Pandarus; honey-sweet lord,--

    Pandarus. Go to, sweet queen, to go:--commends himself most
    affectionately to you,--

98 III, 1, 1562
  • Sweet queen, sweet queen! that's a sweet queen, i' faith.
  • Sweet queen, sweet queen! that's a sweet queen, i' faith.
  • Helen. You shall not bob us out of our melody: if you do,
    our melancholy upon your head!

    Pandarus. Sweet queen, sweet queen! that's a sweet queen, i' faith.

99 III, 1, 1564
  • Nay, that shall not serve your turn; that shall not,
    in truth, la. Nay, I ca...
  • Nay, that shall not serve your turn; that shall not,
    in truth, la. Nay, I care not for such words; no,
    no. And, my lord, he desires you, that if the king
    call for him at supper, you will make his excuse.
  • Helen. And to make a sweet lady sad is a sour offence.

    Pandarus. Nay, that shall not serve your turn; that shall not,
    in truth, la. Nay, I care not for such words; no,
    no. And, my lord, he desires you, that if the king
    call for him at supper, you will make his excuse.

100 III, 1, 1569
  • What says my sweet queen, my very very sweet queen?
  • What says my sweet queen, my very very sweet queen?
  • Helen. My Lord Pandarus,--

    Pandarus. What says my sweet queen, my very very sweet queen?

101 III, 1, 1572
  • What says my sweet queen? My cousin will fall out
    with you. You must not kno...
  • What says my sweet queen? My cousin will fall out
    with you. You must not know where he sups.
  • Helen. Nay, but, my lord,--

    Pandarus. What says my sweet queen? My cousin will fall out
    with you. You must not know where he sups.

102 III, 1, 1575
  • No, no, no such matter; you are wide: come, your
    disposer is sick.
  • No, no, no such matter; you are wide: come, your
    disposer is sick.
  • Paris. I'll lay my life, with my disposer Cressida.

    Pandarus. No, no, no such matter; you are wide: come, your
    disposer is sick.

103 III, 1, 1578
  • Ay, good my lord. Why should you say Cressida? no,
    your poor disposer's sick...
  • Ay, good my lord. Why should you say Cressida? no,
    your poor disposer's sick.
  • Paris. Well, I'll make excuse.

    Pandarus. Ay, good my lord. Why should you say Cressida? no,
    your poor disposer's sick.

104 III, 1, 1581
  • You spy! what do you spy? Come, give me an
    instrument. Now, sweet queen.
  • You spy! what do you spy? Come, give me an
    instrument. Now, sweet queen.
  • Paris. I spy.

    Pandarus. You spy! what do you spy? Come, give me an
    instrument. Now, sweet queen.

105 III, 1, 1584
  • My niece is horribly in love with a thing you have,
    sweet queen.
  • My niece is horribly in love with a thing you have,
    sweet queen.
  • Helen. Why, this is kindly done.

    Pandarus. My niece is horribly in love with a thing you have,
    sweet queen.

106 III, 1, 1587
  • He! no, she'll none of him; they two are twain.
  • He! no, she'll none of him; they two are twain.
  • Helen. She shall have it, my lord, if it be not my lord Paris.

    Pandarus. He! no, she'll none of him; they two are twain.

107 III, 1, 1589
  • Come, come, I'll hear no more of this; I'll sing
    you a song now.
  • Come, come, I'll hear no more of this; I'll sing
    you a song now.
  • Helen. Falling in, after falling out, may make them three.

    Pandarus. Come, come, I'll hear no more of this; I'll sing
    you a song now.

108 III, 1, 1593
  • Ay, you may, you may.
  • Ay, you may, you may.
  • Helen. Ay, ay, prithee now. By my troth, sweet lord, thou
    hast a fine forehead.

    Pandarus. Ay, you may, you may.

109 III, 1, 1596
  • Love! ay, that it shall, i' faith.
  • Love! ay, that it shall, i' faith.
  • Helen. Let thy song be love: this love will undo us all.
    O Cupid, Cupid, Cupid!

    Pandarus. Love! ay, that it shall, i' faith.

110 III, 1, 1598
  • In good troth, it begins so.
    [Sings]
    Love, love, nothing but love, still...
  • In good troth, it begins so.
    [Sings]
    Love, love, nothing but love, still more!
    For, O, love's bow
    Shoots buck and doe:
    The shaft confounds,
    Not that it wounds,
    But tickles still the sore.
    These lovers cry Oh! oh! they die!
    Yet that which seems the wound to kill,
    Doth turn oh! oh! to ha! ha! he!
    So dying love lives still:
    Oh! oh! a while, but ha! ha! ha!
    Oh! oh! groans out for ha! ha! ha!
    Heigh-ho!
  • Paris. Ay, good now, love, love, nothing but love.

    Pandarus. In good troth, it begins so.
    [Sings]
    Love, love, nothing but love, still more!
    For, O, love's bow
    Shoots buck and doe:
    The shaft confounds,
    Not that it wounds,
    But tickles still the sore.
    These lovers cry Oh! oh! they die!
    Yet that which seems the wound to kill,
    Doth turn oh! oh! to ha! ha! he!
    So dying love lives still:
    Oh! oh! a while, but ha! ha! ha!
    Oh! oh! groans out for ha! ha! ha!
    Heigh-ho!

111 III, 1, 1617
  • Is this the generation of love? hot blood, hot
    thoughts, and hot deeds? Why,...
  • Is this the generation of love? hot blood, hot
    thoughts, and hot deeds? Why, they are vipers:
    is love a generation of vipers? Sweet lord, who's
    a-field to-day?
  • Paris. He eats nothing but doves, love, and that breeds hot
    blood, and hot blood begets hot thoughts, and hot
    thoughts beget hot deeds, and hot deeds is love.

    Pandarus. Is this the generation of love? hot blood, hot
    thoughts, and hot deeds? Why, they are vipers:
    is love a generation of vipers? Sweet lord, who's
    a-field to-day?

112 III, 1, 1626
  • Not I, honey-sweet queen. I long to hear how they
    sped to-day. You'll rememb...
  • Not I, honey-sweet queen. I long to hear how they
    sped to-day. You'll remember your brother's excuse?
  • Helen. He hangs the lip at something: you know all, Lord Pandarus.

    Pandarus. Not I, honey-sweet queen. I long to hear how they
    sped to-day. You'll remember your brother's excuse?

113 III, 1, 1629
  • Farewell, sweet queen.
  • Farewell, sweet queen.
  • Paris. To a hair.

    Pandarus. Farewell, sweet queen.

114 III, 1, 1631
  • I will, sweet queen.
  • I will, sweet queen.
  • Helen. Commend me to your niece.

    Pandarus. I will, sweet queen.

115 III, 2, 1648
  • How now! where's thy master? at my cousin
    Cressida's?
  • How now! where's thy master? at my cousin
    Cressida's?
  • (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS and Troilus's Boy, meeting]

    Pandarus. How now! where's thy master? at my cousin
    Cressida's?

116 III, 2, 1651
  • O, here he comes.
    [Enter TROILUS]
    How now, how now!
  • O, here he comes.
    [Enter TROILUS]
    How now, how now!
  • Boy. No, sir; he stays for you to conduct him thither.

    Pandarus. O, here he comes.
    [Enter TROILUS]
    How now, how now!

117 III, 2, 1656
  • Have you seen my cousin?
  • Have you seen my cousin?
  • (stage directions). [Exit Boy]

    Pandarus. Have you seen my cousin?

118 III, 2, 1665
  • Walk here i' the orchard, I'll bring her straight.
  • Walk here i' the orchard, I'll bring her straight.
  • Troilus. No, Pandarus: I stalk about her door,
    Like a strange soul upon the Stygian banks
    Staying for waftage. O, be thou my Charon,
    And give me swift transportance to those fields
    Where I may wallow in the lily-beds
    Proposed for the deserver! O gentle Pandarus,
    From Cupid's shoulder pluck his painted wings
    And fly with me to Cressid!

    Pandarus. Walk here i' the orchard, I'll bring her straight.

119 III, 2, 1680
  • She's making her ready, she'll come straight: you
    must be witty now. She doe...
  • She's making her ready, she'll come straight: you
    must be witty now. She does so blush, and fetches
    her wind so short, as if she were frayed with a
    sprite: I'll fetch her. It is the prettiest
    villain: she fetches her breath as short as a
    new-ta'en sparrow.
  • (stage directions). [Re-enter PANDARUS]

    Pandarus. She's making her ready, she'll come straight: you
    must be witty now. She does so blush, and fetches
    her wind so short, as if she were frayed with a
    sprite: I'll fetch her. It is the prettiest
    villain: she fetches her breath as short as a
    new-ta'en sparrow.

120 III, 2, 1693
  • Come, come, what need you blush? shame's a baby.
    Here she is now: swear the...
  • Come, come, what need you blush? shame's a baby.
    Here she is now: swear the oaths now to her that
    you have sworn to me. What, are you gone again?
    you must be watched ere you be made tame, must you?
    Come your ways, come your ways; an you draw backward,
    we'll put you i' the fills. Why do you not speak to
    her? Come, draw this curtain, and let's see your
    picture. Alas the day, how loath you are to offend
    daylight! an 'twere dark, you'ld close sooner.
    So, so; rub on, and kiss the mistress. How now!
    a kiss in fee-farm! build there, carpenter; the air
    is sweet. Nay, you shall fight your hearts out ere
    I part you. The falcon as the tercel, for all the
    ducks i' the river: go to, go to.
  • (stage directions). [Re-enter PANDARUS with CRESSIDA]

    Pandarus. Come, come, what need you blush? shame's a baby.
    Here she is now: swear the oaths now to her that
    you have sworn to me. What, are you gone again?
    you must be watched ere you be made tame, must you?
    Come your ways, come your ways; an you draw backward,
    we'll put you i' the fills. Why do you not speak to
    her? Come, draw this curtain, and let's see your
    picture. Alas the day, how loath you are to offend
    daylight! an 'twere dark, you'ld close sooner.
    So, so; rub on, and kiss the mistress. How now!
    a kiss in fee-farm! build there, carpenter; the air
    is sweet. Nay, you shall fight your hearts out ere
    I part you. The falcon as the tercel, for all the
    ducks i' the river: go to, go to.

121 III, 2, 1708
  • Words pay no debts, give her deeds: but she'll
    bereave you o' the deeds too,...
  • Words pay no debts, give her deeds: but she'll
    bereave you o' the deeds too, if she call your
    activity in question. What, billing again? Here's
    'In witness whereof the parties interchangeably'--
    Come in, come in: I'll go get a fire.
  • Troilus. You have bereft me of all words, lady.

    Pandarus. Words pay no debts, give her deeds: but she'll
    bereave you o' the deeds too, if she call your
    activity in question. What, billing again? Here's
    'In witness whereof the parties interchangeably'--
    Come in, come in: I'll go get a fire.

122 III, 2, 1752
  • What, blushing still? have you not done talking yet?
  • What, blushing still? have you not done talking yet?
  • (stage directions). [Re-enter PANDARUS]

    Pandarus. What, blushing still? have you not done talking yet?

123 III, 2, 1754
  • I thank you for that: if my lord get a boy of you,
    you'll give him me. Be tr...
  • I thank you for that: if my lord get a boy of you,
    you'll give him me. Be true to my lord: if he
    flinch, chide me for it.
  • Cressida. Well, uncle, what folly I commit, I dedicate to you.

    Pandarus. I thank you for that: if my lord get a boy of you,
    you'll give him me. Be true to my lord: if he
    flinch, chide me for it.

124 III, 2, 1759
  • Nay, I'll give my word for her too: our kindred,
    though they be long ere the...
  • Nay, I'll give my word for her too: our kindred,
    though they be long ere they are wooed, they are
    constant being won: they are burs, I can tell you;
    they'll stick where they are thrown.
  • Troilus. You know now your hostages; your uncle's word and my
    firm faith.

    Pandarus. Nay, I'll give my word for her too: our kindred,
    though they be long ere they are wooed, they are
    constant being won: they are burs, I can tell you;
    they'll stick where they are thrown.

125 III, 2, 1785
  • Pretty, i' faith.
  • Pretty, i' faith.
  • Troilus. And shall, albeit sweet music issues thence.

    Pandarus. Pretty, i' faith.

126 III, 2, 1791
  • Leave! an you take leave till to-morrow morning,--
  • Leave! an you take leave till to-morrow morning,--
  • Troilus. Your leave, sweet Cressid!

    Pandarus. Leave! an you take leave till to-morrow morning,--

127 III, 2, 1848
  • Go to, a bargain made: seal it, seal it; I'll be the
    witness. Here I hold yo...
  • Go to, a bargain made: seal it, seal it; I'll be the
    witness. Here I hold your hand, here my cousin's.
    If ever you prove false one to another, since I have
    taken such pains to bring you together, let all
    pitiful goers-between be called to the world's end
    after my name; call them all Pandars; let all
    constant men be Troiluses, all false women Cressids,
    and all brokers-between Pandars! say, amen.
  • Cressida. Prophet may you be!
    If I be false, or swerve a hair from truth,
    When time is old and hath forgot itself,
    When waterdrops have worn the stones of Troy,
    And blind oblivion swallow'd cities up,
    And mighty states characterless are grated
    To dusty nothing, yet let memory,
    From false to false, among false maids in love,
    Upbraid my falsehood! when they've said 'as false
    As air, as water, wind, or sandy earth,
    As fox to lamb, as wolf to heifer's calf,
    Pard to the hind, or stepdame to her son,'
    'Yea,' let them say, to stick the heart of falsehood,
    'As false as Cressid.'

    Pandarus. Go to, a bargain made: seal it, seal it; I'll be the
    witness. Here I hold your hand, here my cousin's.
    If ever you prove false one to another, since I have
    taken such pains to bring you together, let all
    pitiful goers-between be called to the world's end
    after my name; call them all Pandars; let all
    constant men be Troiluses, all false women Cressids,
    and all brokers-between Pandars! say, amen.

128 III, 2, 1858
  • Amen. Whereupon I will show you a chamber with a
    bed; which bed, because it...
  • Amen. Whereupon I will show you a chamber with a
    bed; which bed, because it shall not speak of your
    pretty encounters, press it to death: away!
    And Cupid grant all tongue-tied maidens here
    Bed, chamber, Pandar to provide this gear!
  • Cressida. Amen.

    Pandarus. Amen. Whereupon I will show you a chamber with a
    bed; which bed, because it shall not speak of your
    pretty encounters, press it to death: away!
    And Cupid grant all tongue-tied maidens here
    Bed, chamber, Pandar to provide this gear!

129 IV, 2, 2310
  • [Within] What, 's all the doors open here?
  • [Within] What, 's all the doors open here?
  • Cressida. Prithee, tarry:
    You men will never tarry.
    O foolish Cressid! I might have still held off,
    And then you would have tarried. Hark!
    there's one up.

    Pandarus. [Within] What, 's all the doors open here?

130 IV, 2, 2315
  • How now, how now! how go maidenheads? Here, you
    maid! where's my cousin Cres...
  • How now, how now! how go maidenheads? Here, you
    maid! where's my cousin Cressid?
  • (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS]

    Pandarus. How now, how now! how go maidenheads? Here, you
    maid! where's my cousin Cressid?

131 IV, 2, 2319
  • To do what? to do what? let her say
    what: what have I brought you to do?
  • To do what? to do what? let her say
    what: what have I brought you to do?
  • Cressida. Go hang yourself, you naughty mocking uncle!
    You bring me to do, and then you flout me too.

    Pandarus. To do what? to do what? let her say
    what: what have I brought you to do?

132 IV, 2, 2323
  • Ha! ha! Alas, poor wretch! ah, poor capocchia!
    hast not slept to-night? woul...
  • Ha! ha! Alas, poor wretch! ah, poor capocchia!
    hast not slept to-night? would he not, a naughty
    man, let it sleep? a bugbear take him!
  • Cressida. Come, come, beshrew your heart! you'll ne'er be good,
    Nor suffer others.

    Pandarus. Ha! ha! Alas, poor wretch! ah, poor capocchia!
    hast not slept to-night? would he not, a naughty
    man, let it sleep? a bugbear take him!

133 IV, 2, 2337
  • Who's there? what's the matter? will you beat
    down the door? How now! what's...
  • Who's there? what's the matter? will you beat
    down the door? How now! what's the matter?
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS and CRESSIDA]

    Pandarus. Who's there? what's the matter? will you beat
    down the door? How now! what's the matter?

134 IV, 2, 2341
  • Who's there? my Lord AEneas! By my troth,
    I knew you not: what news with you...
  • Who's there? my Lord AEneas! By my troth,
    I knew you not: what news with you so early?
  • Aeneas. Good morrow, lord, good morrow.

    Pandarus. Who's there? my Lord AEneas! By my troth,
    I knew you not: what news with you so early?

135 IV, 2, 2344
  • Here! what should he do here?
  • Here! what should he do here?
  • Aeneas. Is not Prince Troilus here?

    Pandarus. Here! what should he do here?

136 IV, 2, 2347
  • Is he here, say you? 'tis more than I know, I'll
    be sworn: for my own part,...
  • Is he here, say you? 'tis more than I know, I'll
    be sworn: for my own part, I came in late. What
    should he do here?
  • Aeneas. Come, he is here, my lord; do not deny him:
    It doth import him much to speak with me.

    Pandarus. Is he here, say you? 'tis more than I know, I'll
    be sworn: for my own part, I came in late. What
    should he do here?

137 IV, 2, 2373
  • Is't possible? no sooner got but lost? The devil
    take Antenor! the young pri...
  • Is't possible? no sooner got but lost? The devil
    take Antenor! the young prince will go mad: a
    plague upon Antenor! I would they had broke 's neck!
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS and AENEAS]

    Pandarus. Is't possible? no sooner got but lost? The devil
    take Antenor! the young prince will go mad: a
    plague upon Antenor! I would they had broke 's neck!

138 IV, 2, 2378
  • Ah, ah!
  • Ah, ah!
  • Cressida. How now! what's the matter? who was here?

    Pandarus. Ah, ah!

139 IV, 2, 2381
  • Would I were as deep under the earth as I am above!
  • Would I were as deep under the earth as I am above!
  • Cressida. Why sigh you so profoundly? where's my lord? gone!
    Tell me, sweet uncle, what's the matter?

    Pandarus. Would I were as deep under the earth as I am above!

140 IV, 2, 2383
  • Prithee, get thee in: would thou hadst ne'er been
    born! I knew thou wouldst...
  • Prithee, get thee in: would thou hadst ne'er been
    born! I knew thou wouldst be his death. O, poor
    gentleman! A plague upon Antenor!
  • Cressida. O the gods! what's the matter?

    Pandarus. Prithee, get thee in: would thou hadst ne'er been
    born! I knew thou wouldst be his death. O, poor
    gentleman! A plague upon Antenor!

141 IV, 2, 2388
  • Thou must be gone, wench, thou must be gone; thou
    art changed for Antenor: t...
  • Thou must be gone, wench, thou must be gone; thou
    art changed for Antenor: thou must to thy father,
    and be gone from Troilus: 'twill be his death;
    'twill be his bane; he cannot bear it.
  • Cressida. Good uncle, I beseech you, on my knees! beseech you,
    what's the matter?

    Pandarus. Thou must be gone, wench, thou must be gone; thou
    art changed for Antenor: thou must to thy father,
    and be gone from Troilus: 'twill be his death;
    'twill be his bane; he cannot bear it.

142 IV, 2, 2393
  • Thou must.
  • Thou must.
  • Cressida. O you immortal gods! I will not go.

    Pandarus. Thou must.

143 IV, 2, 2404
  • Do, do.
  • Do, do.
  • Cressida. I will not, uncle: I have forgot my father;
    I know no touch of consanguinity;
    No kin no love, no blood, no soul so near me
    As the sweet Troilus. O you gods divine!
    Make Cressid's name the very crown of falsehood,
    If ever she leave Troilus! Time, force, and death,
    Do to this body what extremes you can;
    But the strong base and building of my love
    Is as the very centre of the earth,
    Drawing all things to it. I'll go in and weep,--

    Pandarus. Do, do.

144 IV, 4, 2427
  • Be moderate, be moderate.
  • Be moderate, be moderate.
  • (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS and CRESSIDA]

    Pandarus. Be moderate, be moderate.

145 IV, 4, 2437
  • Here, here, here he comes.
    [Enter TROILUS]
    Ah, sweet ducks!
  • Here, here, here he comes.
    [Enter TROILUS]
    Ah, sweet ducks!
  • Cressida. Why tell you me of moderation?
    The grief is fine, full, perfect, that I taste,
    And violenteth in a sense as strong
    As that which causeth it: how can I moderate it?
    If I could temporize with my affection,
    Or brew it to a weak and colder palate,
    The like allayment could I give my grief.
    My love admits no qualifying dross;
    No more my grief, in such a precious loss.

    Pandarus. Here, here, here he comes.
    [Enter TROILUS]
    Ah, sweet ducks!

146 IV, 4, 2442
  • What a pair of spectacles is here!
    Let me embrace too. 'O heart,' as the goo...
  • What a pair of spectacles is here!
    Let me embrace too. 'O heart,' as the goodly saying is,
    '--O heart, heavy heart,
    Why sigh'st thou without breaking?
    where he answers again,
    'Because thou canst not ease thy smart
    By friendship nor by speaking.'
    There was never a truer rhyme. Let us cast away
    nothing, for we may live to have need of such a
    verse: we see it, we see it. How now, lambs?
  • (stage directions). [Embracing him]

    Pandarus. What a pair of spectacles is here!
    Let me embrace too. 'O heart,' as the goodly saying is,
    '--O heart, heavy heart,
    Why sigh'st thou without breaking?
    where he answers again,
    'Because thou canst not ease thy smart
    By friendship nor by speaking.'
    There was never a truer rhyme. Let us cast away
    nothing, for we may live to have need of such a
    verse: we see it, we see it. How now, lambs?

147 IV, 4, 2457
  • Ay, ay, ay, ay; 'tis too plain a case.
  • Ay, ay, ay, ay; 'tis too plain a case.
  • Cressida. Have the gods envy?

    Pandarus. Ay, ay, ay, ay; 'tis too plain a case.

148 IV, 4, 2483
  • Where are my tears? rain, to lay this wind, or
    my heart will be blown up by...
  • Where are my tears? rain, to lay this wind, or
    my heart will be blown up by the root.
  • Troilus. Hark! you are call'd: some say the Genius so
    Cries 'come' to him that instantly must die.
    Bid them have patience; she shall come anon.

    Pandarus. Where are my tears? rain, to lay this wind, or
    my heart will be blown up by the root.

149 V, 3, 3391
  • Do you hear, my lord? do you hear?
  • Do you hear, my lord? do you hear?
  • (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS]

    Pandarus. Do you hear, my lord? do you hear?

150 V, 3, 3393
  • Here's a letter come from yond poor girl.
  • Here's a letter come from yond poor girl.
  • Troilus. What now?

    Pandarus. Here's a letter come from yond poor girl.

151 V, 3, 3395
  • A whoreson tisick, a whoreson rascally tisick so
    troubles me, and the foolis...
  • A whoreson tisick, a whoreson rascally tisick so
    troubles me, and the foolish fortune of this girl;
    and what one thing, what another, that I shall
    leave you one o' these days: and I have a rheum
    in mine eyes too, and such an ache in my bones
    that, unless a man were cursed, I cannot tell what
    to think on't. What says she there?
  • Troilus. Let me read.

    Pandarus. A whoreson tisick, a whoreson rascally tisick so
    troubles me, and the foolish fortune of this girl;
    and what one thing, what another, that I shall
    leave you one o' these days: and I have a rheum
    in mine eyes too, and such an ache in my bones
    that, unless a man were cursed, I cannot tell what
    to think on't. What says she there?

152 V, 10, 3668
  • But hear you, hear you!
  • But hear you, hear you!
  • Troilus. You understand me not that tell me so:
    I do not speak of flight, of fear, of death,
    But dare all imminence that gods and men
    Address their dangers in. Hector is gone:
    Who shall tell Priam so, or Hecuba?
    Let him that will a screech-owl aye be call'd,
    Go in to Troy, and say there, Hector's dead:
    There is a word will Priam turn to stone;
    Make wells and Niobes of the maids and wives,
    Cold statues of the youth, and, in a word,
    Scare Troy out of itself. But, march away:
    Hector is dead; there is no more to say.
    Stay yet. You vile abominable tents,
    Thus proudly pight upon our Phrygian plains,
    Let Titan rise as early as he dare,
    I'll through and through you! and, thou great-sized coward,
    No space of earth shall sunder our two hates:
    I'll haunt thee like a wicked conscience still,
    That mouldeth goblins swift as frenzy's thoughts.
    Strike a free march to Troy! with comfort go:
    Hope of revenge shall hide our inward woe.
    [Exeunt AENEAS and Trojans]
    [As TROILUS is going out, enter, from the other]
    side, PANDARUS]

    Pandarus. But hear you, hear you!

153 V, 10, 3672
  • A goodly medicine for my aching bones! O world!
    world! world! thus is the po...
  • A goodly medicine for my aching bones! O world!
    world! world! thus is the poor agent despised!
    O traitors and bawds, how earnestly are you set
    a-work, and how ill requited! why should our
    endeavour be so loved and the performance so loathed?
    what verse for it? what instance for it? Let me see:
    Full merrily the humble-bee doth sing,
    Till he hath lost his honey and his sting;
    And being once subdued in armed tail,
    Sweet honey and sweet notes together fail.
    Good traders in the flesh, set this in your
    painted cloths.
    As many as be here of pander's hall,
    Your eyes, half out, weep out at Pandar's fall;
    Or if you cannot weep, yet give some groans,
    Though not for me, yet for your aching bones.
    Brethren and sisters of the hold-door trade,
    Some two months hence my will shall here be made:
    It should be now, but that my fear is this,
    Some galled goose of Winchester would hiss:
    Till then I'll sweat and seek about for eases,
    And at that time bequeathe you my diseases.
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    Pandarus. A goodly medicine for my aching bones! O world!
    world! world! thus is the poor agent despised!
    O traitors and bawds, how earnestly are you set
    a-work, and how ill requited! why should our
    endeavour be so loved and the performance so loathed?
    what verse for it? what instance for it? Let me see:
    Full merrily the humble-bee doth sing,
    Till he hath lost his honey and his sting;
    And being once subdued in armed tail,
    Sweet honey and sweet notes together fail.
    Good traders in the flesh, set this in your
    painted cloths.
    As many as be here of pander's hall,
    Your eyes, half out, weep out at Pandar's fall;
    Or if you cannot weep, yet give some groans,
    Though not for me, yet for your aching bones.
    Brethren and sisters of the hold-door trade,
    Some two months hence my will shall here be made:
    It should be now, but that my fear is this,
    Some galled goose of Winchester would hiss:
    Till then I'll sweat and seek about for eases,
    And at that time bequeathe you my diseases.

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