Speeches (Lines) for Peter in "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 13
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 II, 4, 1259
  • Anon!
  • Anon!
  • Nurse. Peter!

    Peter. Anon!

2 II, 4, 1312
  • I saw no man use you a pleasure; if I had, my weapon
    should quickly have bee...
  • I saw no man use you a pleasure; if I had, my weapon
    should quickly have been out, I warrant you: I dare
    draw as soon as another man, if I see occasion in a
    good quarrel, and the law on my side.
  • Nurse. An a' speak any thing against me, I'll take him
    down, an a' were lustier than he is, and twenty such
    Jacks; and if I cannot, I'll find those that shall.
    Scurvy knave! I am none of his flirt-gills; I am
    none of his skains-mates. And thou must stand by
    too, and suffer every knave to use me at his pleasure?

    Peter. I saw no man use you a pleasure; if I had, my weapon
    should quickly have been out, I warrant you: I dare
    draw as soon as another man, if I see occasion in a
    good quarrel, and the law on my side.

3 II, 4, 1371
  • Anon!
  • Anon!
  • Nurse. Ay, a thousand times.
    [Exit Romeo]
    Peter!

    Peter. Anon!

4 IV, 5, 2762
  • Musicians, O, musicians, 'Heart's ease, Heart's
    ease:' O, an you will have m...
  • Musicians, O, musicians, 'Heart's ease, Heart's
    ease:' O, an you will have me live, play 'Heart's ease.'
  • (stage directions). [Enter PETER]

    Peter. Musicians, O, musicians, 'Heart's ease, Heart's
    ease:' O, an you will have me live, play 'Heart's ease.'

5 IV, 5, 2765
  • O, musicians, because my heart itself plays 'My
    heart is full of woe:' O, pl...
  • O, musicians, because my heart itself plays 'My
    heart is full of woe:' O, play me some merry dump,
    to comfort me.
  • First Musician. Why 'Heart's ease?'

    Peter. O, musicians, because my heart itself plays 'My
    heart is full of woe:' O, play me some merry dump,
    to comfort me.

6 IV, 5, 2769
  • You will not, then?
  • You will not, then?
  • First Musician. Not a dump we; 'tis no time to play now.

    Peter. You will not, then?

7 IV, 5, 2771
  • I will then give it you soundly.
  • I will then give it you soundly.
  • First Musician. No.

    Peter. I will then give it you soundly.

8 IV, 5, 2773
  • No money, on my faith, but the gleek;
    I will give you the minstrel.
  • No money, on my faith, but the gleek;
    I will give you the minstrel.
  • First Musician. What will you give us?

    Peter. No money, on my faith, but the gleek;
    I will give you the minstrel.

9 IV, 5, 2776
  • Then will I lay the serving-creature's dagger on
    your pate. I will carry no...
  • Then will I lay the serving-creature's dagger on
    your pate. I will carry no crotchets: I'll re you,
    I'll fa you; do you note me?
  • First Musician. Then I will give you the serving-creature.

    Peter. Then will I lay the serving-creature's dagger on
    your pate. I will carry no crotchets: I'll re you,
    I'll fa you; do you note me?

10 IV, 5, 2781
  • Then have at you with my wit! I will dry-beat you
    with an iron wit, and put...
  • Then have at you with my wit! I will dry-beat you
    with an iron wit, and put up my iron dagger. Answer
    me like men:
    'When griping grief the heart doth wound,
    And doleful dumps the mind oppress,
    Then music with her silver sound'--
    why 'silver sound'? why 'music with her silver
    sound'? What say you, Simon Catling?
  • Second Musician. Pray you, put up your dagger, and put out your wit.

    Peter. Then have at you with my wit! I will dry-beat you
    with an iron wit, and put up my iron dagger. Answer
    me like men:
    'When griping grief the heart doth wound,
    And doleful dumps the mind oppress,
    Then music with her silver sound'--
    why 'silver sound'? why 'music with her silver
    sound'? What say you, Simon Catling?

11 IV, 5, 2790
  • Pretty! What say you, Hugh Rebeck?
  • Pretty! What say you, Hugh Rebeck?
  • First Musician. Marry, sir, because silver hath a sweet sound.

    Peter. Pretty! What say you, Hugh Rebeck?

12 IV, 5, 2792
  • Pretty too! What say you, James Soundpost?
  • Pretty too! What say you, James Soundpost?
  • Second Musician. I say 'silver sound,' because musicians sound for silver.

    Peter. Pretty too! What say you, James Soundpost?

13 IV, 5, 2794
  • O, I cry you mercy; you are the singer: I will say
    for you. It is 'music wit...
  • O, I cry you mercy; you are the singer: I will say
    for you. It is 'music with her silver sound,'
    because musicians have no gold for sounding:
    'Then music with her silver sound
    With speedy help doth lend redress.'
  • Third Musician. Faith, I know not what to say.

    Peter. O, I cry you mercy; you are the singer: I will say
    for you. It is 'music with her silver sound,'
    because musicians have no gold for sounding:
    'Then music with her silver sound
    With speedy help doth lend redress.'

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