Speeches (Lines) for Polonius in "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark"

Total: 86
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 2, 260
  • He hath, my lord, wrung from me my slow leave
    By laboursome petition, and at...
  • He hath, my lord, wrung from me my slow leave
    By laboursome petition, and at last
    Upon his will I seal'd my hard consent.
    I do beseech you give him leave to go.
  • Claudius. Have you your father's leave? What says Polonius?

    Polonius. He hath, my lord, wrung from me my slow leave
    By laboursome petition, and at last
    Upon his will I seal'd my hard consent.
    I do beseech you give him leave to go.

2 I, 3, 541
  • Yet here, Laertes? Aboard, aboard, for shame!
    The wind sits in the shoulder...
  • Yet here, Laertes? Aboard, aboard, for shame!
    The wind sits in the shoulder of your sail,
    And you are stay'd for. There- my blessing with thee!
    And these few precepts in thy memory
    Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue,
    Nor any unproportion'd thought his act.
    Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar:
    Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
    Grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel;
    But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
    Of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade. Beware
    Of entrance to a quarrel; but being in,
    Bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee.
    Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice;
    Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.
    Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
    But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
    For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
    And they in France of the best rank and station
    Are most select and generous, chief in that.
    Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
    For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
    And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
    This above all- to thine own self be true,
    And it must follow, as the night the day,
    Thou canst not then be false to any man.
    Farewell. My blessing season this in thee!
  • Laertes. O, fear me not!
    [Enter Polonius. ]
    I stay too long. But here my father comes.
    A double blessing is a double grace;
    Occasion smiles upon a second leave.

    Polonius. Yet here, Laertes? Aboard, aboard, for shame!
    The wind sits in the shoulder of your sail,
    And you are stay'd for. There- my blessing with thee!
    And these few precepts in thy memory
    Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue,
    Nor any unproportion'd thought his act.
    Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar:
    Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
    Grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel;
    But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
    Of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade. Beware
    Of entrance to a quarrel; but being in,
    Bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee.
    Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice;
    Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.
    Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
    But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
    For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
    And they in France of the best rank and station
    Are most select and generous, chief in that.
    Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
    For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
    And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
    This above all- to thine own self be true,
    And it must follow, as the night the day,
    Thou canst not then be false to any man.
    Farewell. My blessing season this in thee!

3 I, 3, 569
  • The time invites you. Go, your servants tend.
  • The time invites you. Go, your servants tend.
  • Laertes. Most humbly do I take my leave, my lord.

    Polonius. The time invites you. Go, your servants tend.

4 I, 3, 575
  • What is't, Ophelia, he hath said to you?
  • What is't, Ophelia, he hath said to you?
  • Laertes. Farewell. Exit.

    Polonius. What is't, Ophelia, he hath said to you?

5 I, 3, 577
  • Marry, well bethought!
    'Tis told me he hath very oft of late
    Given priva...
  • Marry, well bethought!
    'Tis told me he hath very oft of late
    Given private time to you, and you yourself
    Have of your audience been most free and bounteous.
    If it be so- as so 'tis put on me,
    And that in way of caution- I must tell you
    You do not understand yourself so clearly
    As it behooves my daughter and your honour.
    What is between you? Give me up the truth.
  • Ophelia. So please you, something touching the Lord Hamlet.

    Polonius. Marry, well bethought!
    'Tis told me he hath very oft of late
    Given private time to you, and you yourself
    Have of your audience been most free and bounteous.
    If it be so- as so 'tis put on me,
    And that in way of caution- I must tell you
    You do not understand yourself so clearly
    As it behooves my daughter and your honour.
    What is between you? Give me up the truth.

6 I, 3, 588
  • Affection? Pooh! You speak like a green girl,
    Unsifted in such perilous circ...
  • Affection? Pooh! You speak like a green girl,
    Unsifted in such perilous circumstance.
    Do you believe his tenders, as you call them?
  • Ophelia. He hath, my lord, of late made many tenders
    Of his affection to me.

    Polonius. Affection? Pooh! You speak like a green girl,
    Unsifted in such perilous circumstance.
    Do you believe his tenders, as you call them?

7 I, 3, 592
  • Marry, I will teach you! Think yourself a baby
    That you have ta'en these ten...
  • Marry, I will teach you! Think yourself a baby
    That you have ta'en these tenders for true pay,
    Which are not sterling. Tender yourself more dearly,
    Or (not to crack the wind of the poor phrase,
    Running it thus) you'll tender me a fool.
  • Ophelia. I do not know, my lord, what I should think,

    Polonius. Marry, I will teach you! Think yourself a baby
    That you have ta'en these tenders for true pay,
    Which are not sterling. Tender yourself more dearly,
    Or (not to crack the wind of the poor phrase,
    Running it thus) you'll tender me a fool.

8 I, 3, 599
  • Ay, fashion you may call it. Go to, go to!
  • Ay, fashion you may call it. Go to, go to!
  • Ophelia. My lord, he hath importun'd me with love
    In honourable fashion.

    Polonius. Ay, fashion you may call it. Go to, go to!

9 I, 3, 602
  • Ay, springes to catch woodcocks! I do know,
    When the blood burns, how prodig...
  • Ay, springes to catch woodcocks! I do know,
    When the blood burns, how prodigal the soul
    Lends the tongue vows. These blazes, daughter,
    Giving more light than heat, extinct in both
    Even in their promise, as it is a-making,
    You must not take for fire. From this time
    Be something scanter of your maiden presence.
    Set your entreatments at a higher rate
    Than a command to parley. For Lord Hamlet,
    Believe so much in him, that he is young,
    And with a larger tether may he walk
    Than may be given you. In few, Ophelia,
    Do not believe his vows; for they are brokers,
    Not of that dye which their investments show,
    But mere implorators of unholy suits,
    Breathing like sanctified and pious bawds,
    The better to beguile. This is for all:
    I would not, in plain terms, from this time forth
    Have you so slander any moment leisure
    As to give words or talk with the Lord Hamlet.
    Look to't, I charge you. Come your ways.
  • Ophelia. And hath given countenance to his speech, my lord,
    With almost all the holy vows of heaven.

    Polonius. Ay, springes to catch woodcocks! I do know,
    When the blood burns, how prodigal the soul
    Lends the tongue vows. These blazes, daughter,
    Giving more light than heat, extinct in both
    Even in their promise, as it is a-making,
    You must not take for fire. From this time
    Be something scanter of your maiden presence.
    Set your entreatments at a higher rate
    Than a command to parley. For Lord Hamlet,
    Believe so much in him, that he is young,
    And with a larger tether may he walk
    Than may be given you. In few, Ophelia,
    Do not believe his vows; for they are brokers,
    Not of that dye which their investments show,
    But mere implorators of unholy suits,
    Breathing like sanctified and pious bawds,
    The better to beguile. This is for all:
    I would not, in plain terms, from this time forth
    Have you so slander any moment leisure
    As to give words or talk with the Lord Hamlet.
    Look to't, I charge you. Come your ways.

10 II, 1, 948
  • Give him this money and these notes, Reynaldo.
  • Give him this money and these notes, Reynaldo.
  • (stage directions). Enter Polonius and Reynaldo.

    Polonius. Give him this money and these notes, Reynaldo.

11 II, 1, 950
  • You shall do marvell's wisely, good Reynaldo,
    Before You visit him, to make...
  • You shall do marvell's wisely, good Reynaldo,
    Before You visit him, to make inquire
    Of his behaviour.
  • Reynaldo. I will, my lord.

    Polonius. You shall do marvell's wisely, good Reynaldo,
    Before You visit him, to make inquire
    Of his behaviour.

12 II, 1, 954
  • Marry, well said, very well said. Look you, sir,
    Enquire me first what Dansk...
  • Marry, well said, very well said. Look you, sir,
    Enquire me first what Danskers are in Paris;
    And how, and who, what means, and where they keep,
    What company, at what expense; and finding
    By this encompassment and drift of question
    That they do know my son, come you more nearer
    Than your particular demands will touch it.
    Take you, as 'twere, some distant knowledge of him;
    As thus, 'I know his father and his friends,
    And in part him.' Do you mark this, Reynaldo?
  • Reynaldo. My lord, I did intend it.

    Polonius. Marry, well said, very well said. Look you, sir,
    Enquire me first what Danskers are in Paris;
    And how, and who, what means, and where they keep,
    What company, at what expense; and finding
    By this encompassment and drift of question
    That they do know my son, come you more nearer
    Than your particular demands will touch it.
    Take you, as 'twere, some distant knowledge of him;
    As thus, 'I know his father and his friends,
    And in part him.' Do you mark this, Reynaldo?

13 II, 1, 965
  • 'And in part him, but,' you may say, 'not well.
    But if't be he I mean, he's...
  • 'And in part him, but,' you may say, 'not well.
    But if't be he I mean, he's very wild
    Addicted so and so'; and there put on him
    What forgeries you please; marry, none so rank
    As may dishonour him- take heed of that;
    But, sir, such wanton, wild, and usual slips
    As are companions noted and most known
    To youth and liberty.
  • Reynaldo. Ay, very well, my lord.

    Polonius. 'And in part him, but,' you may say, 'not well.
    But if't be he I mean, he's very wild
    Addicted so and so'; and there put on him
    What forgeries you please; marry, none so rank
    As may dishonour him- take heed of that;
    But, sir, such wanton, wild, and usual slips
    As are companions noted and most known
    To youth and liberty.

14 II, 1, 974
  • Ay, or drinking, fencing, swearing, quarrelling,
    Drabbing. You may go so far...
  • Ay, or drinking, fencing, swearing, quarrelling,
    Drabbing. You may go so far.
  • Reynaldo. As gaming, my lord.

    Polonius. Ay, or drinking, fencing, swearing, quarrelling,
    Drabbing. You may go so far.

15 II, 1, 977
  • Faith, no, as you may season it in the charge.
    You must not put another scan...
  • Faith, no, as you may season it in the charge.
    You must not put another scandal on him,
    That he is open to incontinency.
    That's not my meaning. But breathe his faults so quaintly
    That they may seem the taints of liberty,
    The flash and outbreak of a fiery mind,
    A savageness in unreclaimed blood,
    Of general assault.
  • Reynaldo. My lord, that would dishonour him.

    Polonius. Faith, no, as you may season it in the charge.
    You must not put another scandal on him,
    That he is open to incontinency.
    That's not my meaning. But breathe his faults so quaintly
    That they may seem the taints of liberty,
    The flash and outbreak of a fiery mind,
    A savageness in unreclaimed blood,
    Of general assault.

16 II, 1, 986
  • Wherefore should you do this?
  • Wherefore should you do this?
  • Reynaldo. But, my good lord-

    Polonius. Wherefore should you do this?

17 II, 1, 989
  • Marry, sir, here's my drift,
    And I believe it is a fetch of warrant.
    You...
  • Marry, sir, here's my drift,
    And I believe it is a fetch of warrant.
    You laying these slight sullies on my son
    As 'twere a thing a little soil'd i' th' working,
    Mark you,
    Your party in converse, him you would sound,
    Having ever seen in the prenominate crimes
    The youth you breathe of guilty, be assur'd
    He closes with you in this consequence:
    'Good sir,' or so, or 'friend,' or 'gentleman'-
    According to the phrase or the addition
    Of man and country-
  • Reynaldo. Ay, my lord,
    I would know that.

    Polonius. Marry, sir, here's my drift,
    And I believe it is a fetch of warrant.
    You laying these slight sullies on my son
    As 'twere a thing a little soil'd i' th' working,
    Mark you,
    Your party in converse, him you would sound,
    Having ever seen in the prenominate crimes
    The youth you breathe of guilty, be assur'd
    He closes with you in this consequence:
    'Good sir,' or so, or 'friend,' or 'gentleman'-
    According to the phrase or the addition
    Of man and country-

18 II, 1, 1002
  • And then, sir, does 'a this- 'a does- What was I about to say?
    By the mass,...
  • And then, sir, does 'a this- 'a does- What was I about to say?
    By the mass, I was about to say something! Where did I leave?
  • Reynaldo. Very good, my lord.

    Polonius. And then, sir, does 'a this- 'a does- What was I about to say?
    By the mass, I was about to say something! Where did I leave?

19 II, 1, 1006
  • At 'closes in the consequence'- Ay, marry!
    He closes thus: 'I know the gentl...
  • At 'closes in the consequence'- Ay, marry!
    He closes thus: 'I know the gentleman.
    I saw him yesterday, or t'other day,
    Or then, or then, with such or such; and, as you say,
    There was 'a gaming; there o'ertook in's rouse;
    There falling out at tennis'; or perchance,
    'I saw him enter such a house of sale,'
    Videlicet, a brothel, or so forth.
    See you now-
    Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth;
    And thus do we of wisdom and of reach,
    With windlasses and with assays of bias,
    By indirections find directions out.
    So, by my former lecture and advice,
    Shall you my son. You have me, have you not?
  • Reynaldo. At 'closes in the consequence,' at 'friend or so,' and
    gentleman.'

    Polonius. At 'closes in the consequence'- Ay, marry!
    He closes thus: 'I know the gentleman.
    I saw him yesterday, or t'other day,
    Or then, or then, with such or such; and, as you say,
    There was 'a gaming; there o'ertook in's rouse;
    There falling out at tennis'; or perchance,
    'I saw him enter such a house of sale,'
    Videlicet, a brothel, or so forth.
    See you now-
    Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth;
    And thus do we of wisdom and of reach,
    With windlasses and with assays of bias,
    By indirections find directions out.
    So, by my former lecture and advice,
    Shall you my son. You have me, have you not?

20 II, 1, 1022
  • God b' wi' ye, fare ye well!
  • God b' wi' ye, fare ye well!
  • Reynaldo. My lord, I have.

    Polonius. God b' wi' ye, fare ye well!

21 II, 1, 1024
  • Observe his inclination in yourself.
  • Observe his inclination in yourself.
  • Reynaldo. Good my lord! [Going.]

    Polonius. Observe his inclination in yourself.

22 II, 1, 1026
  • And let him ply his music.
  • And let him ply his music.
  • Reynaldo. I shall, my lord.

    Polonius. And let him ply his music.

23 II, 1, 1028
  • Farewell!
    [Exit Reynaldo.]
    [Enter Ophelia.]
    How now, Ophelia? What's...
  • Farewell!
    [Exit Reynaldo.]
    [Enter Ophelia.]
    How now, Ophelia? What's the matter?
  • Reynaldo. Well, my lord.

    Polonius. Farewell!
    [Exit Reynaldo.]
    [Enter Ophelia.]
    How now, Ophelia? What's the matter?

24 II, 1, 1033
  • With what, i' th' name of God?
  • With what, i' th' name of God?
  • Ophelia. O my lord, my lord, I have been so affrighted!

    Polonius. With what, i' th' name of God?

25 II, 1, 1042
  • Mad for thy love?
  • Mad for thy love?
  • Ophelia. My lord, as I was sewing in my closet,
    Lord Hamlet, with his doublet all unbrac'd,
    No hat upon his head, his stockings foul'd,
    Ungart'red, and down-gyved to his ankle;
    Pale as his shirt, his knees knocking each other,
    And with a look so piteous in purport
    As if he had been loosed out of hell
    To speak of horrors- he comes before me.

    Polonius. Mad for thy love?

26 II, 1, 1045
  • What said he?
  • What said he?
  • Ophelia. My lord, I do not know,
    But truly I do fear it.

    Polonius. What said he?

27 II, 1, 1060
  • Come, go with me. I will go seek the King.
    This is the very ecstasy of love,...
  • Come, go with me. I will go seek the King.
    This is the very ecstasy of love,
    Whose violent property fordoes itself
    And leads the will to desperate undertakings
    As oft as any passion under heaven
    That does afflict our natures. I am sorry.
    What, have you given him any hard words of late?
  • Ophelia. He took me by the wrist and held me hard;
    Then goes he to the length of all his arm,
    And, with his other hand thus o'er his brow,
    He falls to such perusal of my face
    As he would draw it. Long stay'd he so.
    At last, a little shaking of mine arm,
    And thrice his head thus waving up and down,
    He rais'd a sigh so piteous and profound
    As it did seem to shatter all his bulk
    And end his being. That done, he lets me go,
    And with his head over his shoulder turn'd
    He seem'd to find his way without his eyes,
    For out o' doors he went without their help
    And to the last bended their light on me.

    Polonius. Come, go with me. I will go seek the King.
    This is the very ecstasy of love,
    Whose violent property fordoes itself
    And leads the will to desperate undertakings
    As oft as any passion under heaven
    That does afflict our natures. I am sorry.
    What, have you given him any hard words of late?

28 II, 1, 1070
  • That hath made him mad.
    I am sorry that with better heed and judgment
    I...
  • That hath made him mad.
    I am sorry that with better heed and judgment
    I had not quoted him. I fear'd he did but trifle
    And meant to wrack thee; but beshrew my jealousy!
    By heaven, it is as proper to our age
    To cast beyond ourselves in our opinions
    As it is common for the younger sort
    To lack discretion. Come, go we to the King.
    This must be known; which, being kept close, might move
    More grief to hide than hate to utter love.
    Come.
  • Ophelia. No, my good lord; but, as you did command,
    I did repel his letters and denied
    His access to me.

    Polonius. That hath made him mad.
    I am sorry that with better heed and judgment
    I had not quoted him. I fear'd he did but trifle
    And meant to wrack thee; but beshrew my jealousy!
    By heaven, it is as proper to our age
    To cast beyond ourselves in our opinions
    As it is common for the younger sort
    To lack discretion. Come, go we to the King.
    This must be known; which, being kept close, might move
    More grief to hide than hate to utter love.
    Come.

29 II, 2, 1128
  • Th' ambassadors from Norway, my good lord,
    Are joyfully return'd.
  • Th' ambassadors from Norway, my good lord,
    Are joyfully return'd.
  • (stage directions). Enter Polonius.

    Polonius. Th' ambassadors from Norway, my good lord,
    Are joyfully return'd.

30 II, 2, 1131
  • Have I, my lord? Assure you, my good liege,
    I hold my duty as I hold my soul...
  • Have I, my lord? Assure you, my good liege,
    I hold my duty as I hold my soul,
    Both to my God and to my gracious king;
    And I do think- or else this brain of mine
    Hunts not the trail of policy so sure
    As it hath us'd to do- that I have found
    The very cause of Hamlet's lunacy.
  • Claudius. Thou still hast been the father of good news.

    Polonius. Have I, my lord? Assure you, my good liege,
    I hold my duty as I hold my soul,
    Both to my God and to my gracious king;
    And I do think- or else this brain of mine
    Hunts not the trail of policy so sure
    As it hath us'd to do- that I have found
    The very cause of Hamlet's lunacy.

31 II, 2, 1139
  • Give first admittance to th' ambassadors.
    My news shall be the fruit to that...
  • Give first admittance to th' ambassadors.
    My news shall be the fruit to that great feast.
  • Claudius. O, speak of that! That do I long to hear.

    Polonius. Give first admittance to th' ambassadors.
    My news shall be the fruit to that great feast.

32 II, 2, 1179
  • This business is well ended.
    My liege, and madam, to expostulate
    What ma...
  • This business is well ended.
    My liege, and madam, to expostulate
    What majesty should be, what duty is,
    Why day is day, night is night, and time is time.
    Were nothing but to waste night, day, and time.
    Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit,
    And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes,
    I will be brief. Your noble son is mad.
    Mad call I it; for, to define true madness,
    What is't but to be nothing else but mad?
    But let that go.
  • Claudius. It likes us well;
    And at our more consider'd time we'll read,
    Answer, and think upon this business.
    Meantime we thank you for your well-took labour.
    Go to your rest; at night we'll feast together.
    Most welcome home! Exeunt Ambassadors.

    Polonius. This business is well ended.
    My liege, and madam, to expostulate
    What majesty should be, what duty is,
    Why day is day, night is night, and time is time.
    Were nothing but to waste night, day, and time.
    Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit,
    And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes,
    I will be brief. Your noble son is mad.
    Mad call I it; for, to define true madness,
    What is't but to be nothing else but mad?
    But let that go.

33 II, 2, 1191
  • Madam, I swear I use no art at all.
    That he is mad, 'tis true: 'tis true 'ti...
  • Madam, I swear I use no art at all.
    That he is mad, 'tis true: 'tis true 'tis pity;
    And pity 'tis 'tis true. A foolish figure!
    But farewell it, for I will use no art.
    Mad let us grant him then. And now remains
    That we find out the cause of this effect-
    Or rather say, the cause of this defect,
    For this effect defective comes by cause.
    Thus it remains, and the remainder thus.
    Perpend.
    I have a daughter (have while she is mine),
    Who in her duty and obedience, mark,
    Hath given me this. Now gather, and surmise.
    [Reads] the letter.]
    'To the celestial, and my soul's idol, the most beautified Ophelia,'-
    That's an ill phrase, a vile phrase; 'beautified' is a vile phrase.
    But you shall hear. Thus:
    [Reads.]
    'In her excellent white bosom, these, &c.'
  • Gertrude. More matter, with less art.

    Polonius. Madam, I swear I use no art at all.
    That he is mad, 'tis true: 'tis true 'tis pity;
    And pity 'tis 'tis true. A foolish figure!
    But farewell it, for I will use no art.
    Mad let us grant him then. And now remains
    That we find out the cause of this effect-
    Or rather say, the cause of this defect,
    For this effect defective comes by cause.
    Thus it remains, and the remainder thus.
    Perpend.
    I have a daughter (have while she is mine),
    Who in her duty and obedience, mark,
    Hath given me this. Now gather, and surmise.
    [Reads] the letter.]
    'To the celestial, and my soul's idol, the most beautified Ophelia,'-
    That's an ill phrase, a vile phrase; 'beautified' is a vile phrase.
    But you shall hear. Thus:
    [Reads.]
    'In her excellent white bosom, these, &c.'

34 II, 2, 1211
  • Good madam, stay awhile. I will be faithful. [Reads.]
    'Doubt thou...
  • Good madam, stay awhile. I will be faithful. [Reads.]
    'Doubt thou the stars are fire;
    Doubt that the sun doth move;
    Doubt truth to be a liar;
    But never doubt I love.
    'O dear Ophelia, I am ill at these numbers; I have not art to
    reckon my groans; but that I love thee best, O most best, believe
    it. Adieu.
    'Thine evermore, most dear lady, whilst this machine is to
    him, HAMLET.'
    This, in obedience, hath my daughter shown me;
    And more above, hath his solicitings,
    As they fell out by time, by means, and place,
    All given to mine ear.
  • Gertrude. Came this from Hamlet to her?

    Polonius. Good madam, stay awhile. I will be faithful. [Reads.]
    'Doubt thou the stars are fire;
    Doubt that the sun doth move;
    Doubt truth to be a liar;
    But never doubt I love.
    'O dear Ophelia, I am ill at these numbers; I have not art to
    reckon my groans; but that I love thee best, O most best, believe
    it. Adieu.
    'Thine evermore, most dear lady, whilst this machine is to
    him, HAMLET.'
    This, in obedience, hath my daughter shown me;
    And more above, hath his solicitings,
    As they fell out by time, by means, and place,
    All given to mine ear.

35 II, 2, 1227
  • What do you think of me?
  • What do you think of me?
  • Claudius. But how hath she
    Receiv'd his love?

    Polonius. What do you think of me?

36 II, 2, 1229
  • I would fain prove so. But what might you think,
    When I had seen this hot l...
  • I would fain prove so. But what might you think,
    When I had seen this hot love on the wing
    (As I perceiv'd it, I must tell you that,
    Before my daughter told me), what might you,
    Or my dear Majesty your queen here, think,
    If I had play'd the desk or table book,
    Or given my heart a winking, mute and dumb,
    Or look'd upon this love with idle sight?
    What might you think? No, I went round to work
    And my young mistress thus I did bespeak:
    'Lord Hamlet is a prince, out of thy star.
    This must not be.' And then I prescripts gave her,
    That she should lock herself from his resort,
    Admit no messengers, receive no tokens.
    Which done, she took the fruits of my advice,
    And he, repulsed, a short tale to make,
    Fell into a sadness, then into a fast,
    Thence to a watch, thence into a weakness,
    Thence to a lightness, and, by this declension,
    Into the madness wherein now he raves,
    And all we mourn for.
  • Claudius. As of a man faithful and honourable.

    Polonius. I would fain prove so. But what might you think,
    When I had seen this hot love on the wing
    (As I perceiv'd it, I must tell you that,
    Before my daughter told me), what might you,
    Or my dear Majesty your queen here, think,
    If I had play'd the desk or table book,
    Or given my heart a winking, mute and dumb,
    Or look'd upon this love with idle sight?
    What might you think? No, I went round to work
    And my young mistress thus I did bespeak:
    'Lord Hamlet is a prince, out of thy star.
    This must not be.' And then I prescripts gave her,
    That she should lock herself from his resort,
    Admit no messengers, receive no tokens.
    Which done, she took the fruits of my advice,
    And he, repulsed, a short tale to make,
    Fell into a sadness, then into a fast,
    Thence to a watch, thence into a weakness,
    Thence to a lightness, and, by this declension,
    Into the madness wherein now he raves,
    And all we mourn for.

37 II, 2, 1252
  • Hath there been such a time- I would fain know that-
    That I have Positively...
  • Hath there been such a time- I would fain know that-
    That I have Positively said 'Tis so,'
    When it prov'd otherwise.?
  • Gertrude. it may be, very like.

    Polonius. Hath there been such a time- I would fain know that-
    That I have Positively said 'Tis so,'
    When it prov'd otherwise.?

38 II, 2, 1256
  • [points to his head and shoulder] Take this from this, if this be otherwise.
  • [points to his head and shoulder] Take this from this, if this be otherwise.
    If circumstances lead me, I will find
    Where truth is hid, though it were hid indeed
    Within the centre.
  • Claudius. Not that I know.

    Polonius. [points to his head and shoulder] Take this from this, if this be otherwise.
    If circumstances lead me, I will find
    Where truth is hid, though it were hid indeed
    Within the centre.

39 II, 2, 1261
  • You know sometimes he walks for hours together
    Here in the lobby.
  • You know sometimes he walks for hours together
    Here in the lobby.
  • Claudius. How may we try it further?

    Polonius. You know sometimes he walks for hours together
    Here in the lobby.

40 II, 2, 1264
  • At such a time I'll loose my daughter to him.
    Be you and I behind an arras t...
  • At such a time I'll loose my daughter to him.
    Be you and I behind an arras then.
    Mark the encounter. If he love her not,
    And he not from his reason fall'n thereon
    Let me be no assistant for a state,
    But keep a farm and carters.
  • Gertrude. So he does indeed.

    Polonius. At such a time I'll loose my daughter to him.
    Be you and I behind an arras then.
    Mark the encounter. If he love her not,
    And he not from his reason fall'n thereon
    Let me be no assistant for a state,
    But keep a farm and carters.

41 II, 2, 1273
  • Away, I do beseech you, both away
    I'll board him presently. O, give me leave...
  • Away, I do beseech you, both away
    I'll board him presently. O, give me leave.
    [Exeunt King and Queen, [with Attendants].]
    How does my good Lord Hamlet?
  • Gertrude. But look where sadly the poor wretch comes reading.

    Polonius. Away, I do beseech you, both away
    I'll board him presently. O, give me leave.
    [Exeunt King and Queen, [with Attendants].]
    How does my good Lord Hamlet?

42 II, 2, 1278
  • Do you know me, my lord?
  • Do you know me, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Well, God-a-mercy.

    Polonius. Do you know me, my lord?

43 II, 2, 1280
  • Not I, my lord.
  • Not I, my lord.
  • Hamlet. Excellent well. You are a fishmonger.

    Polonius. Not I, my lord.

44 II, 2, 1282
  • Honest, my lord?
  • Honest, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Then I would you were so honest a man.

    Polonius. Honest, my lord?

45 II, 2, 1285
  • That's very true, my lord.
  • That's very true, my lord.
  • Hamlet. Ay, sir. To be honest, as this world goes, is to be one man
    pick'd out of ten thousand.

    Polonius. That's very true, my lord.

46 II, 2, 1288
  • I have, my lord.
  • I have, my lord.
  • Hamlet. For if the sun breed maggots in a dead dog, being a god
    kissing carrion- Have you a daughter?

    Polonius. I have, my lord.

47 II, 2, 1291
  • [aside] How say you by that? Still harping on my daughter. Yet
    he knew me no...
  • [aside] How say you by that? Still harping on my daughter. Yet
    he knew me not at first. He said I was a fishmonger. He is far
    gone, far gone! And truly in my youth I suff'red much extremity
    for love- very near this. I'll speak to him again.- What do you
    read, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Let her not walk i' th' sun. Conception is a blessing, but not
    as your daughter may conceive. Friend, look to't.

    Polonius. [aside] How say you by that? Still harping on my daughter. Yet
    he knew me not at first. He said I was a fishmonger. He is far
    gone, far gone! And truly in my youth I suff'red much extremity
    for love- very near this. I'll speak to him again.- What do you
    read, my lord?

48 II, 2, 1297
  • What is the matter, my lord?
  • What is the matter, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Words, words, words.

    Polonius. What is the matter, my lord?

49 II, 2, 1299
  • I mean, the matter that you read, my lord.
  • I mean, the matter that you read, my lord.
  • Hamlet. Between who?

    Polonius. I mean, the matter that you read, my lord.

50 II, 2, 1307
  • [aside] Though this be madness, yet there is a method in't.-
    Will You walk...
  • [aside] Though this be madness, yet there is a method in't.-
    Will You walk out of the air, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Slanders, sir; for the satirical rogue says here that old men
    have grey beards; that their faces are wrinkled; their eyes
    purging thick amber and plum-tree gum; and that they have a
    plentiful lack of wit, together with most weak hams. All which,
    sir, though I most powerfully and potently believe, yet I hold it
    not honesty to have it thus set down; for you yourself, sir,
    should be old as I am if, like a crab, you could go backward.

    Polonius. [aside] Though this be madness, yet there is a method in't.-
    Will You walk out of the air, my lord?

51 II, 2, 1310
  • Indeed, that is out o' th' air. [Aside] How pregnant sometimes
    his replies a...
  • Indeed, that is out o' th' air. [Aside] How pregnant sometimes
    his replies are! a happiness that often madness hits on, which
    reason and sanity could not so prosperously be delivered of. I
    will leave him and suddenly contrive the means of meeting between
    him and my daughter.- My honourable lord, I will most humbly take
    my leave of you.
  • Hamlet. Into my grave?

    Polonius. Indeed, that is out o' th' air. [Aside] How pregnant sometimes
    his replies are! a happiness that often madness hits on, which
    reason and sanity could not so prosperously be delivered of. I
    will leave him and suddenly contrive the means of meeting between
    him and my daughter.- My honourable lord, I will most humbly take
    my leave of you.

52 II, 2, 1320
  • Fare you well, my lord.
  • Fare you well, my lord.
  • (stage directions). Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

    Polonius. Fare you well, my lord.

53 II, 2, 1322
  • You go to seek the Lord Hamlet. There he is.
  • You go to seek the Lord Hamlet. There he is.
  • Hamlet. These tedious old fools!

    Polonius. You go to seek the Lord Hamlet. There he is.

54 II, 2, 1463
  • Well be with you, gentlemen!
  • Well be with you, gentlemen!
  • (stage directions). Enter Polonius.

    Polonius. Well be with you, gentlemen!

55 II, 2, 1471
  • My lord, I have news to tell you.
  • My lord, I have news to tell you.
  • Hamlet. I will prophesy he comes to tell me of the players. Mark it.-
    You say right, sir; a Monday morning; twas so indeed.

    Polonius. My lord, I have news to tell you.

56 II, 2, 1473
  • The actors are come hither, my lord.
  • The actors are come hither, my lord.
  • Hamlet. My lord, I have news to tell you. When Roscius was an actor in Rome-

    Polonius. The actors are come hither, my lord.

57 II, 2, 1475
  • Upon my honour-
  • Upon my honour-
  • Hamlet. Buzz, buzz!

    Polonius. Upon my honour-

58 II, 2, 1477
  • The best actors in the world, either for tragedy, comedy,
    history, pastoral,...
  • The best actors in the world, either for tragedy, comedy,
    history, pastoral, pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral,
    tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical-pastoral; scene
    individable, or poem unlimited. Seneca cannot be too heavy, nor
    Plautus too light. For the law of writ and the liberty, these are
    the only men.
  • Hamlet. Then came each actor on his ass-

    Polonius. The best actors in the world, either for tragedy, comedy,
    history, pastoral, pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral,
    tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical-pastoral; scene
    individable, or poem unlimited. Seneca cannot be too heavy, nor
    Plautus too light. For the law of writ and the liberty, these are
    the only men.

59 II, 2, 1484
  • What treasure had he, my lord?
  • What treasure had he, my lord?
  • Hamlet. O Jephthah, judge of Israel, what a treasure hadst thou!

    Polonius. What treasure had he, my lord?

60 II, 2, 1488
  • [aside] Still on my daughter.
  • [aside] Still on my daughter.
  • Hamlet. Why,
    'One fair daughter, and no more,
    The which he loved passing well.'

    Polonius. [aside] Still on my daughter.

61 II, 2, 1490
  • If you call me Jephthah, my lord, I have a daughter that I
    love passing well...
  • If you call me Jephthah, my lord, I have a daughter that I
    love passing well.
  • Hamlet. Am I not i' th' right, old Jephthah?

    Polonius. If you call me Jephthah, my lord, I have a daughter that I
    love passing well.

62 II, 2, 1493
  • What follows then, my lord?
  • What follows then, my lord?
  • Hamlet. Nay, that follows not.

    Polonius. What follows then, my lord?

63 II, 2, 1541
  • Fore God, my lord, well spoken, with good accent and good discretion.
  • Fore God, my lord, well spoken, with good accent and good discretion.
  • Hamlet. I heard thee speak me a speech once, but it was never acted;
    or if it was, not above once; for the play, I remember, pleas'd
    not the million, 'twas caviary to the general; but it was (as I
    receiv'd it, and others, whose judgments in such matters cried in
    the top of mine) an excellent play, well digested in the scenes,
    set down with as much modesty as cunning. I remember one said
    there were no sallets in the lines to make the matter savoury,
    nor no matter in the phrase that might indict the author of
    affectation; but call'd it an honest method, as wholesome as
    sweet, and by very much more handsome than fine. One speech in't
    I chiefly lov'd. 'Twas AEneas' tale to Dido, and thereabout of it
    especially where he speaks of Priam's slaughter. If it live in
    your memory, begin at this line- let me see, let me see:
    'The rugged Pyrrhus, like th' Hyrcanian beast-'
    'Tis not so; it begins with Pyrrhus:
    'The rugged Pyrrhus, he whose sable arms,
    Black as his purpose, did the night resemble
    When he lay couched in the ominous horse,
    Hath now this dread and black complexion smear'd
    With heraldry more dismal. Head to foot
    Now is be total gules, horridly trick'd
    With blood of fathers, mothers, daughters, sons,
    Bak'd and impasted with the parching streets,
    That lend a tyrannous and a damned light
    To their lord's murther. Roasted in wrath and fire,
    And thus o'ersized with coagulate gore,
    With eyes like carbuncles, the hellish Pyrrhus
    Old grandsire Priam seeks.'
    So, proceed you.

    Polonius. Fore God, my lord, well spoken, with good accent and good discretion.

64 II, 2, 1572
  • This is too long.
  • This is too long.
  • First Player. 'Anon he finds him,
    Striking too short at Greeks. His antique sword,
    Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls,
    Repugnant to command. Unequal match'd,
    Pyrrhus at Priam drives, in rage strikes wide;
    But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword
    Th' unnerved father falls. Then senseless Ilium,
    Seeming to feel this blow, with flaming top
    Stoops to his base, and with a hideous crash
    Takes prisoner Pyrrhus' ear. For lo! his sword,
    Which was declining on the milky head
    Of reverend Priam, seem'd i' th' air to stick.
    So, as a painted tyrant, Pyrrhus stood,
    And, like a neutral to his will and matter,
    Did nothing.
    But, as we often see, against some storm,
    A silence in the heavens, the rack stand still,
    The bold winds speechless, and the orb below
    As hush as death- anon the dreadful thunder
    Doth rend the region; so, after Pyrrhus' pause,
    Aroused vengeance sets him new awork;
    And never did the Cyclops' hammers fall
    On Mars's armour, forg'd for proof eterne,
    With less remorse than Pyrrhus' bleeding sword
    Now falls on Priam.
    Out, out, thou strumpet Fortune! All you gods,
    In general synod take away her power;
    Break all the spokes and fellies from her wheel,
    And bowl the round nave down the hill of heaven,
    As low as to the fiends!

    Polonius. This is too long.

65 II, 2, 1578
  • That's good! 'Mobled queen' is good.
  • That's good! 'Mobled queen' is good.
  • Hamlet. 'The mobled queen'?

    Polonius. That's good! 'Mobled queen' is good.

66 II, 2, 1593
  • Look, whe'r he has not turn'd his colour, and has tears in's
    eyes. Prithee n...
  • Look, whe'r he has not turn'd his colour, and has tears in's
    eyes. Prithee no more!
  • First Player. 'Run barefoot up and down, threat'ning the flames
    With bisson rheum; a clout upon that head
    Where late the diadem stood, and for a robe,
    About her lank and all o'erteemed loins,
    A blanket, in the alarm of fear caught up-
    Who this had seen, with tongue in venom steep'd
    'Gainst Fortune's state would treason have pronounc'd.
    But if the gods themselves did see her then,
    When she saw Pyrrhus make malicious sport
    In Mincing with his sword her husband's limbs,
    The instant burst of clamour that she made
    (Unless things mortal move them not at all)
    Would have made milch the burning eyes of heaven
    And passion in the gods.'

    Polonius. Look, whe'r he has not turn'd his colour, and has tears in's
    eyes. Prithee no more!

67 II, 2, 1600
  • My lord, I will use them according to their desert.
  • My lord, I will use them according to their desert.
  • Hamlet. 'Tis well. I'll have thee speak out the rest of this soon.-
    Good my lord, will you see the players well bestow'd? Do you
    hear? Let them be well us'd; for they are the abstract and brief
    chronicles of the time. After your death you were better have a
    bad epitaph than their ill report while you live.

    Polonius. My lord, I will use them according to their desert.

68 II, 2, 1605
  • Come, sirs.
  • Come, sirs.
  • Hamlet. God's bodykins, man, much better! Use every man after his
    desert, and who should scape whipping? Use them after your own
    honour and dignity. The less they deserve, the more merit is in
    your bounty. Take them in.

    Polonius. Come, sirs.

69 III, 1, 1706
  • 'Tis most true;
    And he beseech'd me to entreat your Majesties
    To hear an...
  • 'Tis most true;
    And he beseech'd me to entreat your Majesties
    To hear and see the matter.
  • Rosencrantz. Madam, it so fell out that certain players
    We o'erraught on the way. Of these we told him,
    And there did seem in him a kind of joy
    To hear of it. They are here about the court,
    And, as I think, they have already order
    This night to play before him.

    Polonius. 'Tis most true;
    And he beseech'd me to entreat your Majesties
    To hear and see the matter.

70 III, 1, 1733
  • Ophelia, walk you here.- Gracious, so please you,
    We will bestow ourselves.-...
  • Ophelia, walk you here.- Gracious, so please you,
    We will bestow ourselves.- [To Ophelia] Read on this book,
    That show of such an exercise may colour
    Your loneliness.- We are oft to blame in this,
    'Tis too much prov'd, that with devotion's visage
    And pious action we do sugar o'er
    The Devil himself.
  • (stage directions). [Exit Queen.]

    Polonius. Ophelia, walk you here.- Gracious, so please you,
    We will bestow ourselves.- [To Ophelia] Read on this book,
    That show of such an exercise may colour
    Your loneliness.- We are oft to blame in this,
    'Tis too much prov'd, that with devotion's visage
    And pious action we do sugar o'er
    The Devil himself.

71 III, 1, 1746
  • I hear him coming. Let's withdraw, my lord.
  • I hear him coming. Let's withdraw, my lord.
  • Claudius. [aside] O, 'tis too true!
    How smart a lash that speech doth give my conscience!
    The harlot's cheek, beautied with plast'ring art,
    Is not more ugly to the thing that helps it
    Than is my deed to my most painted word.
    O heavy burthen!

    Polonius. I hear him coming. Let's withdraw, my lord.

72 III, 1, 1868
  • It shall do well. But yet do I believe
    The origin and commencement of his gr...
  • It shall do well. But yet do I believe
    The origin and commencement of his grief
    Sprung from neglected love.- How now, Ophelia?
    You need not tell us what Lord Hamlet said.
    We heard it all.- My lord, do as you please;
    But if you hold it fit, after the play
    Let his queen mother all alone entreat him
    To show his grief. Let her be round with him;
    And I'll be plac'd so please you, in the ear
    Of all their conference. If she find him not,
    To England send him; or confine him where
    Your wisdom best shall think.
  • Claudius. Love? his affections do not that way tend;
    Nor what he spake, though it lack'd form a little,
    Was not like madness. There's something in his soul
    O'er which his melancholy sits on brood;
    And I do doubt the hatch and the disclose
    Will be some danger; which for to prevent,
    I have in quick determination
    Thus set it down: he shall with speed to England
    For the demand of our neglected tribute.
    Haply the seas, and countries different,
    With variable objects, shall expel
    This something-settled matter in his heart,
    Whereon his brains still beating puts him thus
    From fashion of himself. What think you on't?

    Polonius. It shall do well. But yet do I believe
    The origin and commencement of his grief
    Sprung from neglected love.- How now, Ophelia?
    You need not tell us what Lord Hamlet said.
    We heard it all.- My lord, do as you please;
    But if you hold it fit, after the play
    Let his queen mother all alone entreat him
    To show his grief. Let her be round with him;
    And I'll be plac'd so please you, in the ear
    Of all their conference. If she find him not,
    To England send him; or confine him where
    Your wisdom best shall think.

73 III, 2, 1924
  • And the Queen too, and that presently.
  • And the Queen too, and that presently.
  • Hamlet. O, reform it altogether! And let those that play your clowns
    speak no more than is set down for them. For there be of them
    that will themselves laugh, to set on some quantity of barren
    spectators to laugh too, though in the mean time some necessary
    question of the play be then to be considered. That's villanous
    and shows a most pitiful ambition in the fool that uses it. Go
    make you ready.
    [Exeunt Players.]
    [Enter Polonius, Rosencrantz, and Guildenstern.]
    How now, my lord? Will the King hear this piece of work?

    Polonius. And the Queen too, and that presently.

74 III, 2, 1982
  • That did I, my lord, and was accounted a good actor.
  • That did I, my lord, and was accounted a good actor.
  • Hamlet. No, nor mine now. [To Polonius] My lord, you play'd once
    i' th' university, you say?

    Polonius. That did I, my lord, and was accounted a good actor.

75 III, 2, 1984
  • I did enact Julius Caesar; I was kill'd i' th' Capitol; Brutus
    kill'd me.
  • I did enact Julius Caesar; I was kill'd i' th' Capitol; Brutus
    kill'd me.
  • Hamlet. What did you enact?

    Polonius. I did enact Julius Caesar; I was kill'd i' th' Capitol; Brutus
    kill'd me.

76 III, 2, 1991
  • [to the King] O, ho! do you mark that?
  • [to the King] O, ho! do you mark that?
  • Hamlet. No, good mother. Here's metal more attractive.

    Polonius. [to the King] O, ho! do you mark that?

77 III, 2, 2155
  • Give o'er the play.
  • Give o'er the play.
  • Gertrude. How fares my lord?

    Polonius. Give o'er the play.

78 III, 2, 2252
  • My lord, the Queen would speak with you, and presently.
  • My lord, the Queen would speak with you, and presently.
  • Hamlet. Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of me! You
    would play upon me; you would seem to know my stops; you would
    pluck out the heart of my mystery; you would sound me from my
    lowest note to the top of my compass; and there is much music,
    excellent voice, in this little organ, yet cannot you make it
    speak. 'Sblood, do you think I am easier to be play'd on than a
    pipe? Call me what instrument you will, though you can fret me,
    you cannot play upon me.
    [Enter Polonius.]
    God bless you, sir!

    Polonius. My lord, the Queen would speak with you, and presently.

79 III, 2, 2254
  • By th' mass, and 'tis like a camel indeed.
  • By th' mass, and 'tis like a camel indeed.
  • Hamlet. Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?

    Polonius. By th' mass, and 'tis like a camel indeed.

80 III, 2, 2256
  • It is back'd like a weasel.
  • It is back'd like a weasel.
  • Hamlet. Methinks it is like a weasel.

    Polonius. It is back'd like a weasel.

81 III, 2, 2258
  • Very like a whale.
  • Very like a whale.
  • Hamlet. Or like a whale.

    Polonius. Very like a whale.

82 III, 2, 2261
  • I will say so. Exit.
  • I will say so. Exit.
  • Hamlet. Then will I come to my mother by-and-by.- They fool me to the
    top of my bent.- I will come by-and-by.

    Polonius. I will say so. Exit.

83 III, 3, 2307
  • My lord, he's going to his mother's closet.
    Behind the arras I'll convey mys...
  • My lord, he's going to his mother's closet.
    Behind the arras I'll convey myself
    To hear the process. I'll warrant she'll tax him home;
    And, as you said, and wisely was it said,
    'Tis meet that some more audience than a mother,
    Since nature makes them partial, should o'erhear
    The speech, of vantage. Fare you well, my liege.
    I'll call upon you ere you go to bed
    And tell you what I know.
  • (stage directions). Enter Polonius.

    Polonius. My lord, he's going to his mother's closet.
    Behind the arras I'll convey myself
    To hear the process. I'll warrant she'll tax him home;
    And, as you said, and wisely was it said,
    'Tis meet that some more audience than a mother,
    Since nature makes them partial, should o'erhear
    The speech, of vantage. Fare you well, my liege.
    I'll call upon you ere you go to bed
    And tell you what I know.

84 III, 4, 2383
  • He will come straight. Look you lay home to him.
    Tell him his pranks have be...
  • He will come straight. Look you lay home to him.
    Tell him his pranks have been too broad to bear with,
    And that your Grace hath screen'd and stood between
    Much heat and him. I'll silence me even here.
    Pray you be round with him.
  • (stage directions). Enter Queen and Polonius.

    Polonius. He will come straight. Look you lay home to him.
    Tell him his pranks have been too broad to bear with,
    And that your Grace hath screen'd and stood between
    Much heat and him. I'll silence me even here.
    Pray you be round with him.

85 III, 4, 2409
  • [behind] What, ho! help, help, help!
  • [behind] What, ho! help, help, help!
  • Gertrude. What wilt thou do? Thou wilt not murther me?
    Help, help, ho!

    Polonius. [behind] What, ho! help, help, help!

86 III, 4, 2412
  • [behind] O, I am slain!
  • [behind] O, I am slain!
  • (stage directions). [Makes a pass through the arras and] kills Polonius.

    Polonius. [behind] O, I am slain!

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