Speeches (Lines) for Portia in "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar"

Total: 16
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 1
  • Brutus, my lord!
  • Brutus, my lord!
  • Brutus. Good gentlemen, look fresh and merrily;
    Let not our looks put on our purposes,
    But bear it as our Roman actors do,
    With untired spirits and formal constancy:
    And so good morrow to you every one.
    [Exeunt all but BRUTUS]
    Boy! Lucius! Fast asleep? It is no matter;
    Enjoy the honey-heavy dew of slumber:
    Thou hast no figures nor no fantasies,
    Which busy care draws in the brains of men;
    Therefore thou sleep'st so sound.

    Portia. Brutus, my lord!

2 II / 1
  • Nor for yours neither. You've ungently, Brutus,
    Stole from my bed: and yeste...
  • Nor for yours neither. You've ungently, Brutus,
    Stole from my bed: and yesternight, at supper,
    You suddenly arose, and walk'd about,
    Musing and sighing, with your arms across,
    And when I ask'd you what the matter was,
    You stared upon me with ungentle looks;
    I urged you further; then you scratch'd your head,
    And too impatiently stamp'd with your foot;
    Yet I insisted, yet you answer'd not,
    But, with an angry wafture of your hand,
    Gave sign for me to leave you: so I did;
    Fearing to strengthen that impatience
    Which seem'd too much enkindled, and withal
    Hoping it was but an effect of humour,
    Which sometime hath his hour with every man.
    It will not let you eat, nor talk, nor sleep,
    And could it work so much upon your shape
    As it hath much prevail'd on your condition,
    I should not know you, Brutus. Dear my lord,
    Make me acquainted with your cause of grief.
  • Brutus. Portia, what mean you? wherefore rise you now?
    It is not for your health thus to commit
    Your weak condition to the raw cold morning.

    Portia. Nor for yours neither. You've ungently, Brutus,
    Stole from my bed: and yesternight, at supper,
    You suddenly arose, and walk'd about,
    Musing and sighing, with your arms across,
    And when I ask'd you what the matter was,
    You stared upon me with ungentle looks;
    I urged you further; then you scratch'd your head,
    And too impatiently stamp'd with your foot;
    Yet I insisted, yet you answer'd not,
    But, with an angry wafture of your hand,
    Gave sign for me to leave you: so I did;
    Fearing to strengthen that impatience
    Which seem'd too much enkindled, and withal
    Hoping it was but an effect of humour,
    Which sometime hath his hour with every man.
    It will not let you eat, nor talk, nor sleep,
    And could it work so much upon your shape
    As it hath much prevail'd on your condition,
    I should not know you, Brutus. Dear my lord,
    Make me acquainted with your cause of grief.

3 II / 1
  • Brutus is wise, and, were he not in health,
    He would embrace the means to co...
  • Brutus is wise, and, were he not in health,
    He would embrace the means to come by it.
  • Brutus. I am not well in health, and that is all.

    Portia. Brutus is wise, and, were he not in health,
    He would embrace the means to come by it.

4 II / 1
  • Is Brutus sick? and is it physical
    To walk unbraced and suck up the humours...
  • Is Brutus sick? and is it physical
    To walk unbraced and suck up the humours
    Of the dank morning? What, is Brutus sick,
    And will he steal out of his wholesome bed,
    To dare the vile contagion of the night
    And tempt the rheumy and unpurged air
    To add unto his sickness? No, my Brutus;
    You have some sick offence within your mind,
    Which, by the right and virtue of my place,
    I ought to know of: and, upon my knees,
    I charm you, by my once-commended beauty,
    By all your vows of love and that great vow
    Which did incorporate and make us one,
    That you unfold to me, yourself, your half,
    Why you are heavy, and what men to-night
    Have had to resort to you: for here have been
    Some six or seven, who did hide their faces
    Even from darkness.
  • Brutus. Why, so I do. Good Portia, go to bed.

    Portia. Is Brutus sick? and is it physical
    To walk unbraced and suck up the humours
    Of the dank morning? What, is Brutus sick,
    And will he steal out of his wholesome bed,
    To dare the vile contagion of the night
    And tempt the rheumy and unpurged air
    To add unto his sickness? No, my Brutus;
    You have some sick offence within your mind,
    Which, by the right and virtue of my place,
    I ought to know of: and, upon my knees,
    I charm you, by my once-commended beauty,
    By all your vows of love and that great vow
    Which did incorporate and make us one,
    That you unfold to me, yourself, your half,
    Why you are heavy, and what men to-night
    Have had to resort to you: for here have been
    Some six or seven, who did hide their faces
    Even from darkness.

5 II / 1
  • I should not need, if you were gentle Brutus.
    Within the bond of marriage, t...
  • I should not need, if you were gentle Brutus.
    Within the bond of marriage, tell me, Brutus,
    Is it excepted I should know no secrets
    That appertain to you? Am I yourself
    But, as it were, in sort or limitation,
    To keep with you at meals, comfort your bed,
    And talk to you sometimes? Dwell I but in the suburbs
    Of your good pleasure? If it be no more,
    Portia is Brutus' harlot, not his wife.
  • Brutus. Kneel not, gentle Portia.

    Portia. I should not need, if you were gentle Brutus.
    Within the bond of marriage, tell me, Brutus,
    Is it excepted I should know no secrets
    That appertain to you? Am I yourself
    But, as it were, in sort or limitation,
    To keep with you at meals, comfort your bed,
    And talk to you sometimes? Dwell I but in the suburbs
    Of your good pleasure? If it be no more,
    Portia is Brutus' harlot, not his wife.

6 II / 1
  • If this were true, then should I know this secret.
    I grant I am a woman; but...
  • If this were true, then should I know this secret.
    I grant I am a woman; but withal
    A woman that Lord Brutus took to wife:
    I grant I am a woman; but withal
    A woman well-reputed, Cato's daughter.
    Think you I am no stronger than my sex,
    Being so father'd and so husbanded?
    Tell me your counsels, I will not disclose 'em:
    I have made strong proof of my constancy,
    Giving myself a voluntary wound
    Here, in the thigh: can I bear that with patience.
    And not my husband's secrets?
  • Brutus. You are my true and honourable wife,
    As dear to me as are the ruddy drops
    That visit my sad heart

    Portia. If this were true, then should I know this secret.
    I grant I am a woman; but withal
    A woman that Lord Brutus took to wife:
    I grant I am a woman; but withal
    A woman well-reputed, Cato's daughter.
    Think you I am no stronger than my sex,
    Being so father'd and so husbanded?
    Tell me your counsels, I will not disclose 'em:
    I have made strong proof of my constancy,
    Giving myself a voluntary wound
    Here, in the thigh: can I bear that with patience.
    And not my husband's secrets?

7 II / 4
  • I prithee, boy, run to the senate-house;
    Stay not to answer me, but get thee...
  • I prithee, boy, run to the senate-house;
    Stay not to answer me, but get thee gone:
    Why dost thou stay?
  • Artemidorus. 'Caesar, beware of Brutus; take heed of Cassius;
    come not near Casca; have an eye to Cinna, trust not
    Trebonius: mark well Metellus Cimber: Decius Brutus
    loves thee not: thou hast wronged Caius Ligarius.
    There is but one mind in all these men, and it is
    bent against Caesar. If thou beest not immortal,
    look about you: security gives way to conspiracy.
    The mighty gods defend thee! Thy lover,
    'ARTEMIDORUS.'
    Here will I stand till Caesar pass along,
    And as a suitor will I give him this.
    My heart laments that virtue cannot live
    Out of the teeth of emulation.
    If thou read this, O Caesar, thou mayst live;
    If not, the Fates with traitors do contrive.

    Portia. I prithee, boy, run to the senate-house;
    Stay not to answer me, but get thee gone:
    Why dost thou stay?

8 II / 4
  • I would have had thee there, and here again,
    Ere I can tell thee what thou s...
  • I would have had thee there, and here again,
    Ere I can tell thee what thou shouldst do there.
    O constancy, be strong upon my side,
    Set a huge mountain 'tween my heart and tongue!
    I have a man's mind, but a woman's might.
    How hard it is for women to keep counsel!
    Art thou here yet?
  • Lucius. To know my errand, madam.

    Portia. I would have had thee there, and here again,
    Ere I can tell thee what thou shouldst do there.
    O constancy, be strong upon my side,
    Set a huge mountain 'tween my heart and tongue!
    I have a man's mind, but a woman's might.
    How hard it is for women to keep counsel!
    Art thou here yet?

9 II / 4
  • Yes, bring me word, boy, if thy lord look well,
    For he went sickly forth: an...
  • Yes, bring me word, boy, if thy lord look well,
    For he went sickly forth: and take good note
    What Caesar doth, what suitors press to him.
    Hark, boy! what noise is that?
  • Lucius. Madam, what should I do?
    Run to the Capitol, and nothing else?
    And so return to you, and nothing else?

    Portia. Yes, bring me word, boy, if thy lord look well,
    For he went sickly forth: and take good note
    What Caesar doth, what suitors press to him.
    Hark, boy! what noise is that?

10 II / 4
  • Prithee, listen well;
    I heard a bustling rumour, like a fray,
    And the wi...
  • Prithee, listen well;
    I heard a bustling rumour, like a fray,
    And the wind brings it from the Capitol.
  • Lucius. I hear none, madam.

    Portia. Prithee, listen well;
    I heard a bustling rumour, like a fray,
    And the wind brings it from the Capitol.

11 II / 4
  • Come hither, fellow: which way hast thou been?
  • Come hither, fellow: which way hast thou been?
  • Lucius. Sooth, madam, I hear nothing.

    Portia. Come hither, fellow: which way hast thou been?

12 II / 4
  • What is't o'clock?
  • What is't o'clock?
  • Soothsayer. At mine own house, good lady.

    Portia. What is't o'clock?

13 II / 4
  • Is Caesar yet gone to the Capitol?
  • Is Caesar yet gone to the Capitol?
  • Soothsayer. About the ninth hour, lady.

    Portia. Is Caesar yet gone to the Capitol?

14 II / 4
  • Thou hast some suit to Caesar, hast thou not?
  • Thou hast some suit to Caesar, hast thou not?
  • Soothsayer. Madam, not yet: I go to take my stand,
    To see him pass on to the Capitol.

    Portia. Thou hast some suit to Caesar, hast thou not?

15 II / 4
  • Why, know'st thou any harm's intended towards him?
  • Why, know'st thou any harm's intended towards him?
  • Soothsayer. That I have, lady: if it will please Caesar
    To be so good to Caesar as to hear me,
    I shall beseech him to befriend himself.

    Portia. Why, know'st thou any harm's intended towards him?

16 II / 4
  • I must go in. Ay me, how weak a thing
    The heart of woman is! O Brutus,
    T...
  • I must go in. Ay me, how weak a thing
    The heart of woman is! O Brutus,
    The heavens speed thee in thine enterprise!
    Sure, the boy heard me: Brutus hath a suit
    That Caesar will not grant. O, I grow faint.
    Run, Lucius, and commend me to my lord;
    Say I am merry: come to me again,
    And bring me word what he doth say to thee.
  • Soothsayer. None that I know will be, much that I fear may chance.
    Good morrow to you. Here the street is narrow:
    The throng that follows Caesar at the heels,
    Of senators, of praetors, common suitors,
    Will crowd a feeble man almost to death:
    I'll get me to a place more void, and there
    Speak to great Caesar as he comes along.

    Portia. I must go in. Ay me, how weak a thing
    The heart of woman is! O Brutus,
    The heavens speed thee in thine enterprise!
    Sure, the boy heard me: Brutus hath a suit
    That Caesar will not grant. O, I grow faint.
    Run, Lucius, and commend me to my lord;
    Say I am merry: come to me again,
    And bring me word what he doth say to thee.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.