Speeches (Lines) for Posthumus Leonatus in "Cymbeline, King of Britain"

Total: 77
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Please your highness,
    I will from hence to-day.
  • Please your highness,
    I will from hence to-day.
  • Queen. No, be assured you shall not find me, daughter,
    After the slander of most stepmothers,
    Evil-eyed unto you: you're my prisoner, but
    Your gaoler shall deliver you the keys
    That lock up your restraint. For you, Posthumus,
    So soon as I can win the offended king,
    I will be known your advocate: marry, yet
    The fire of rage is in him, and 'twere good
    You lean'd unto his sentence with what patience
    Your wisdom may inform you.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Please your highness,
    I will from hence to-day.

2 I / 1
  • My queen! my mistress!
    O lady, weep no more, lest I give cause
    To be sus...
  • My queen! my mistress!
    O lady, weep no more, lest I give cause
    To be suspected of more tenderness
    Than doth become a man. I will remain
    The loyal'st husband that did e'er plight troth:
    My residence in Rome at one Philario's,
    Who to my father was a friend, to me
    Known but by letter: thither write, my queen,
    And with mine eyes I'll drink the words you send,
    Though ink be made of gall.
  • Imogen. O
    Dissembling courtesy! How fine this tyrant
    Can tickle where she wounds! My dearest husband,
    I something fear my father's wrath; but nothing--
    Always reserved my holy duty--what
    His rage can do on me: you must be gone;
    And I shall here abide the hourly shot
    Of angry eyes, not comforted to live,
    But that there is this jewel in the world
    That I may see again.

    Posthumus Leonatus. My queen! my mistress!
    O lady, weep no more, lest I give cause
    To be suspected of more tenderness
    Than doth become a man. I will remain
    The loyal'st husband that did e'er plight troth:
    My residence in Rome at one Philario's,
    Who to my father was a friend, to me
    Known but by letter: thither write, my queen,
    And with mine eyes I'll drink the words you send,
    Though ink be made of gall.

3 I / 1
  • Should we be taking leave
    As long a term as yet we have to live,
    The loa...
  • Should we be taking leave
    As long a term as yet we have to live,
    The loathness to depart would grow. Adieu!
  • Queen. Be brief, I pray you:
    If the king come, I shall incur I know not
    How much of his displeasure.
    [Aside]
    Yet I'll move him
    To walk this way: I never do him wrong,
    But he does buy my injuries, to be friends;
    Pays dear for my offences.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Should we be taking leave
    As long a term as yet we have to live,
    The loathness to depart would grow. Adieu!

4 I / 1
  • How, how! another?
    You gentle gods, give me but this I have,
    And sear up...
  • How, how! another?
    You gentle gods, give me but this I have,
    And sear up my embracements from a next
    With bonds of death!
    [Putting on the ring]
    Remain, remain thou here
    While sense can keep it on. And, sweetest, fairest,
    As I my poor self did exchange for you,
    To your so infinite loss, so in our trifles
    I still win of you: for my sake wear this;
    It is a manacle of love; I'll place it
    Upon this fairest prisoner.
  • Imogen. Nay, stay a little:
    Were you but riding forth to air yourself,
    Such parting were too petty. Look here, love;
    This diamond was my mother's: take it, heart;
    But keep it till you woo another wife,
    When Imogen is dead.

    Posthumus Leonatus. How, how! another?
    You gentle gods, give me but this I have,
    And sear up my embracements from a next
    With bonds of death!
    [Putting on the ring]
    Remain, remain thou here
    While sense can keep it on. And, sweetest, fairest,
    As I my poor self did exchange for you,
    To your so infinite loss, so in our trifles
    I still win of you: for my sake wear this;
    It is a manacle of love; I'll place it
    Upon this fairest prisoner.

5 I / 1
  • Alack, the king!
  • Alack, the king!
  • Imogen. O the gods!
    When shall we see again?

    Posthumus Leonatus. Alack, the king!

6 I / 1
  • The gods protect you!
    And bless the good remainders of the court! I am gone....
  • The gods protect you!
    And bless the good remainders of the court! I am gone.
  • Cymbeline. Thou basest thing, avoid! hence, from my sight!
    If after this command thou fraught the court
    With thy unworthiness, thou diest: away!
    Thou'rt poison to my blood.

    Posthumus Leonatus. The gods protect you!
    And bless the good remainders of the court! I am gone.

7 I / 4
  • Since when I have been debtor to you for courtesies,
    which I will be ever to...
  • Since when I have been debtor to you for courtesies,
    which I will be ever to pay and yet pay still.
  • Frenchman. Sir, we have known together in Orleans.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Since when I have been debtor to you for courtesies,
    which I will be ever to pay and yet pay still.

8 I / 4
  • By your pardon, sir, I was then a young traveller;
    rather shunned to go even...
  • By your pardon, sir, I was then a young traveller;
    rather shunned to go even with what I heard than in
    my every action to be guided by others' experiences:
    but upon my mended judgment--if I offend not to say
    it is mended--my quarrel was not altogether slight.
  • Frenchman. Sir, you o'er-rate my poor kindness: I was glad I
    did atone my countryman and you; it had been pity
    you should have been put together with so mortal a
    purpose as then each bore, upon importance of so
    slight and trivial a nature.

    Posthumus Leonatus. By your pardon, sir, I was then a young traveller;
    rather shunned to go even with what I heard than in
    my every action to be guided by others' experiences:
    but upon my mended judgment--if I offend not to say
    it is mended--my quarrel was not altogether slight.

9 I / 4
  • She holds her virtue still and I my mind.
  • She holds her virtue still and I my mind.
  • Iachimo. That lady is not now living, or this gentleman's
    opinion by this worn out.

    Posthumus Leonatus. She holds her virtue still and I my mind.

10 I / 4
  • Being so far provoked as I was in France, I would
    abate her nothing, though...
  • Being so far provoked as I was in France, I would
    abate her nothing, though I profess myself her
    adorer, not her friend.
  • Iachimo. You must not so far prefer her 'fore ours of Italy.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Being so far provoked as I was in France, I would
    abate her nothing, though I profess myself her
    adorer, not her friend.

11 I / 4
  • I praised her as I rated her: so do I my stone.
  • I praised her as I rated her: so do I my stone.
  • Iachimo. As fair and as good--a kind of hand-in-hand
    comparison--had been something too fair and too good
    for any lady in Britain. If she went before others
    I have seen, as that diamond of yours outlustres
    many I have beheld. I could not but believe she
    excelled many: but I have not seen the most
    precious diamond that is, nor you the lady.

    Posthumus Leonatus. I praised her as I rated her: so do I my stone.

12 I / 4
  • More than the world enjoys.
  • More than the world enjoys.
  • Iachimo. What do you esteem it at?

    Posthumus Leonatus. More than the world enjoys.

13 I / 4
  • You are mistaken: the one may be sold, or given, if
    there were wealth enough...
  • You are mistaken: the one may be sold, or given, if
    there were wealth enough for the purchase, or merit
    for the gift: the other is not a thing for sale,
    and only the gift of the gods.
  • Iachimo. Either your unparagoned mistress is dead, or she's
    outprized by a trifle.

    Posthumus Leonatus. You are mistaken: the one may be sold, or given, if
    there were wealth enough for the purchase, or merit
    for the gift: the other is not a thing for sale,
    and only the gift of the gods.

14 I / 4
  • Which, by their graces, I will keep.
  • Which, by their graces, I will keep.
  • Iachimo. Which the gods have given you?

    Posthumus Leonatus. Which, by their graces, I will keep.

15 I / 4
  • Your Italy contains none so accomplished a courtier
    to convince the honour o...
  • Your Italy contains none so accomplished a courtier
    to convince the honour of my mistress, if, in the
    holding or loss of that, you term her frail. I do
    nothing doubt you have store of thieves;
    notwithstanding, I fear not my ring.
  • Iachimo. You may wear her in title yours: but, you know,
    strange fowl light upon neighbouring ponds. Your
    ring may be stolen too: so your brace of unprizable
    estimations; the one is but frail and the other
    casual; a cunning thief, or a that way accomplished
    courtier, would hazard the winning both of first and last.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Your Italy contains none so accomplished a courtier
    to convince the honour of my mistress, if, in the
    holding or loss of that, you term her frail. I do
    nothing doubt you have store of thieves;
    notwithstanding, I fear not my ring.

16 I / 4
  • Sir, with all my heart. This worthy signior, I
    thank him, makes no stranger...
  • Sir, with all my heart. This worthy signior, I
    thank him, makes no stranger of me; we are familiar at first.
  • Philario. Let us leave here, gentlemen.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Sir, with all my heart. This worthy signior, I
    thank him, makes no stranger of me; we are familiar at first.

17 I / 4
  • No, no.
  • No, no.
  • Iachimo. With five times so much conversation, I should get
    ground of your fair mistress, make her go back, even
    to the yielding, had I admittance and opportunity to friend.

    Posthumus Leonatus. No, no.

18 I / 4
  • You are a great deal abused in too bold a
    persuasion; and I doubt not you su...
  • You are a great deal abused in too bold a
    persuasion; and I doubt not you sustain what you're
    worthy of by your attempt.
  • Iachimo. I dare thereupon pawn the moiety of my estate to
    your ring; which, in my opinion, o'ervalues it
    something: but I make my wager rather against your
    confidence than her reputation: and, to bar your
    offence herein too, I durst attempt it against any
    lady in the world.

    Posthumus Leonatus. You are a great deal abused in too bold a
    persuasion; and I doubt not you sustain what you're
    worthy of by your attempt.

19 I / 4
  • A repulse: though your attempt, as you call it,
    deserve more; a punishment t...
  • A repulse: though your attempt, as you call it,
    deserve more; a punishment too.
  • Iachimo. What's that?

    Posthumus Leonatus. A repulse: though your attempt, as you call it,
    deserve more; a punishment too.

20 I / 4
  • What lady would you choose to assail?
  • What lady would you choose to assail?
  • Iachimo. Would I had put my estate and my neighbour's on the
    approbation of what I have spoke!

    Posthumus Leonatus. What lady would you choose to assail?

21 I / 4
  • I will wage against your gold, gold to it: my ring
    I hold dear as my finger;...
  • I will wage against your gold, gold to it: my ring
    I hold dear as my finger; 'tis part of it.
  • Iachimo. Yours; whom in constancy you think stands so safe.
    I will lay you ten thousand ducats to your ring,
    that, commend me to the court where your lady is,
    with no more advantage than the opportunity of a
    second conference, and I will bring from thence
    that honour of hers which you imagine so reserved.

    Posthumus Leonatus. I will wage against your gold, gold to it: my ring
    I hold dear as my finger; 'tis part of it.

22 I / 4
  • This is but a custom in your tongue; you bear a
    graver purpose, I hope.
  • This is but a custom in your tongue; you bear a
    graver purpose, I hope.
  • Iachimo. You are afraid, and therein the wiser. If you buy
    ladies' flesh at a million a dram, you cannot
    preserve it from tainting: but I see you have some
    religion in you, that you fear.

    Posthumus Leonatus. This is but a custom in your tongue; you bear a
    graver purpose, I hope.

23 I / 4
  • Will you? I shall but lend my diamond till your
    return: let there be covenan...
  • Will you? I shall but lend my diamond till your
    return: let there be covenants drawn between's: my
    mistress exceeds in goodness the hugeness of your
    unworthy thinking: I dare you to this match: here's my ring.
  • Iachimo. I am the master of my speeches, and would undergo
    what's spoken, I swear.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Will you? I shall but lend my diamond till your
    return: let there be covenants drawn between's: my
    mistress exceeds in goodness the hugeness of your
    unworthy thinking: I dare you to this match: here's my ring.

24 I / 4
  • I embrace these conditions; let us have articles
    betwixt us. Only, thus far...
  • I embrace these conditions; let us have articles
    betwixt us. Only, thus far you shall answer: if
    you make your voyage upon her and give me directly
    to understand you have prevailed, I am no further
    your enemy; she is not worth our debate: if she
    remain unseduced, you not making it appear
    otherwise, for your ill opinion and the assault you
    have made to her chastity you shall answer me with
    your sword.
  • Iachimo. By the gods, it is one. If I bring you no
    sufficient testimony that I have enjoyed the dearest
    bodily part of your mistress, my ten thousand ducats
    are yours; so is your diamond too: if I come off,
    and leave her in such honour as you have trust in,
    she your jewel, this your jewel, and my gold are
    yours: provided I have your commendation for my more
    free entertainment.

    Posthumus Leonatus. I embrace these conditions; let us have articles
    betwixt us. Only, thus far you shall answer: if
    you make your voyage upon her and give me directly
    to understand you have prevailed, I am no further
    your enemy; she is not worth our debate: if she
    remain unseduced, you not making it appear
    otherwise, for your ill opinion and the assault you
    have made to her chastity you shall answer me with
    your sword.

25 I / 4
  • Agreed.
  • Agreed.
  • Iachimo. Your hand; a covenant: we will have these things set
    down by lawful counsel, and straight away for
    Britain, lest the bargain should catch cold and
    starve: I will fetch my gold and have our two
    wagers recorded.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Agreed.

26 II / 4
  • Fear it not, sir: I would I were so sure
    To win the king as I am bold her ho...
  • Fear it not, sir: I would I were so sure
    To win the king as I am bold her honour
    Will remain hers.
  • Cloten. I'll be revenged:
    'His meanest garment!' Well.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Fear it not, sir: I would I were so sure
    To win the king as I am bold her honour
    Will remain hers.

27 II / 4
  • Not any, but abide the change of time,
    Quake in the present winter's state a...
  • Not any, but abide the change of time,
    Quake in the present winter's state and wish
    That warmer days would come: in these sear'd hopes,
    I barely gratify your love; they failing,
    I must die much your debtor.
  • Philario. What means do you make to him?

    Posthumus Leonatus. Not any, but abide the change of time,
    Quake in the present winter's state and wish
    That warmer days would come: in these sear'd hopes,
    I barely gratify your love; they failing,
    I must die much your debtor.

28 II / 4
  • I do believe,
    Statist though I am none, nor like to be,
    That this will p...
  • I do believe,
    Statist though I am none, nor like to be,
    That this will prove a war; and you shall hear
    The legions now in Gallia sooner landed
    In our not-fearing Britain than have tidings
    Of any penny tribute paid. Our countrymen
    Are men more order'd than when Julius Caesar
    Smiled at their lack of skill, but found
    their courage
    Worthy his frowning at: their discipline,
    Now mingled with their courages, will make known
    To their approvers they are people such
    That mend upon the world.
  • Philario. Your very goodness and your company
    O'erpays all I can do. By this, your king
    Hath heard of great Augustus: Caius Lucius
    Will do's commission throughly: and I think
    He'll grant the tribute, send the arrearages,
    Or look upon our Romans, whose remembrance
    Is yet fresh in their grief.

    Posthumus Leonatus. I do believe,
    Statist though I am none, nor like to be,
    That this will prove a war; and you shall hear
    The legions now in Gallia sooner landed
    In our not-fearing Britain than have tidings
    Of any penny tribute paid. Our countrymen
    Are men more order'd than when Julius Caesar
    Smiled at their lack of skill, but found
    their courage
    Worthy his frowning at: their discipline,
    Now mingled with their courages, will make known
    To their approvers they are people such
    That mend upon the world.

29 II / 4
  • The swiftest harts have posted you by land;
    And winds of all the comers kiss...
  • The swiftest harts have posted you by land;
    And winds of all the comers kiss'd your sails,
    To make your vessel nimble.
  • Philario. See! Iachimo!

    Posthumus Leonatus. The swiftest harts have posted you by land;
    And winds of all the comers kiss'd your sails,
    To make your vessel nimble.

30 II / 4
  • I hope the briefness of your answer made
    The speediness of your return.
  • I hope the briefness of your answer made
    The speediness of your return.
  • Philario. Welcome, sir.

    Posthumus Leonatus. I hope the briefness of your answer made
    The speediness of your return.

31 II / 4
  • And therewithal the best; or let her beauty
    Look through a casement to allur...
  • And therewithal the best; or let her beauty
    Look through a casement to allure false hearts
    And be false with them.
  • Iachimo. Your lady
    Is one of the fairest that I have look'd upon.

    Posthumus Leonatus. And therewithal the best; or let her beauty
    Look through a casement to allure false hearts
    And be false with them.

32 II / 4
  • Their tenor good, I trust.
  • Their tenor good, I trust.
  • Iachimo. Here are letters for you.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Their tenor good, I trust.

33 II / 4
  • All is well yet.
    Sparkles this stone as it was wont? or is't not
    Too dul...
  • All is well yet.
    Sparkles this stone as it was wont? or is't not
    Too dull for your good wearing?
  • Iachimo. He was expected then,
    But not approach'd.

    Posthumus Leonatus. All is well yet.
    Sparkles this stone as it was wont? or is't not
    Too dull for your good wearing?

34 II / 4
  • The stone's too hard to come by.
  • The stone's too hard to come by.
  • Iachimo. If I had lost it,
    I should have lost the worth of it in gold.
    I'll make a journey twice as far, to enjoy
    A second night of such sweet shortness which
    Was mine in Britain, for the ring is won.

    Posthumus Leonatus. The stone's too hard to come by.

35 II / 4
  • Make not, sir,
    Your loss your sport: I hope you know that we
    Must not co...
  • Make not, sir,
    Your loss your sport: I hope you know that we
    Must not continue friends.
  • Iachimo. Not a whit,
    Your lady being so easy.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Make not, sir,
    Your loss your sport: I hope you know that we
    Must not continue friends.

36 II / 4
  • If you can make't apparent
    That you have tasted her in bed, my hand
    And...
  • If you can make't apparent
    That you have tasted her in bed, my hand
    And ring is yours; if not, the foul opinion
    You had of her pure honour gains or loses
    Your sword or mine, or masterless leaves both
    To who shall find them.
  • Iachimo. Good sir, we must,
    If you keep covenant. Had I not brought
    The knowledge of your mistress home, I grant
    We were to question further: but I now
    Profess myself the winner of her honour,
    Together with your ring; and not the wronger
    Of her or you, having proceeded but
    By both your wills.

    Posthumus Leonatus. If you can make't apparent
    That you have tasted her in bed, my hand
    And ring is yours; if not, the foul opinion
    You had of her pure honour gains or loses
    Your sword or mine, or masterless leaves both
    To who shall find them.

37 II / 4
  • Proceed.
  • Proceed.
  • Iachimo. Sir, my circumstances,
    Being so near the truth as I will make them,
    Must first induce you to believe: whose strength
    I will confirm with oath; which, I doubt not,
    You'll give me leave to spare, when you shall find
    You need it not.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Proceed.

38 II / 4
  • This is true;
    And this you might have heard of here, by me,
    Or by some o...
  • This is true;
    And this you might have heard of here, by me,
    Or by some other.
  • Iachimo. First, her bedchamber,--
    Where, I confess, I slept not, but profess
    Had that was well worth watching--it was hang'd
    With tapesty of silk and silver; the story
    Proud Cleopatra, when she met her Roman,
    And Cydnus swell'd above the banks, or for
    The press of boats or pride: a piece of work
    So bravely done, so rich, that it did strive
    In workmanship and value; which I wonder'd
    Could be so rarely and exactly wrought,
    Since the true life on't was--

    Posthumus Leonatus. This is true;
    And this you might have heard of here, by me,
    Or by some other.

39 II / 4
  • So they must,
    Or do your honour injury.
  • So they must,
    Or do your honour injury.
  • Iachimo. More particulars
    Must justify my knowledge.

    Posthumus Leonatus. So they must,
    Or do your honour injury.

40 II / 4
  • This is a thing
    Which you might from relation likewise reap,
    Being, as i...
  • This is a thing
    Which you might from relation likewise reap,
    Being, as it is, much spoke of.
  • Iachimo. The chimney
    Is south the chamber, and the chimney-piece
    Chaste Dian bathing: never saw I figures
    So likely to report themselves: the cutter
    Was as another nature, dumb; outwent her,
    Motion and breath left out.

    Posthumus Leonatus. This is a thing
    Which you might from relation likewise reap,
    Being, as it is, much spoke of.

41 II / 4
  • This is her honour!
    Let it be granted you have seen all this--and praise
  • This is her honour!
    Let it be granted you have seen all this--and praise
    Be given to your remembrance--the description
    Of what is in her chamber nothing saves
    The wager you have laid.
  • Iachimo. The roof o' the chamber
    With golden cherubins is fretted: her andirons--
    I had forgot them--were two winking Cupids
    Of silver, each on one foot standing, nicely
    Depending on their brands.

    Posthumus Leonatus. This is her honour!
    Let it be granted you have seen all this--and praise
    Be given to your remembrance--the description
    Of what is in her chamber nothing saves
    The wager you have laid.

42 II / 4
  • Jove!
    Once more let me behold it: is it that
    Which I left with her?
  • Jove!
    Once more let me behold it: is it that
    Which I left with her?
  • Iachimo. Then, if you can,
    [Showing the bracelet]
    Be pale: I beg but leave to air this jewel; see!
    And now 'tis up again: it must be married
    To that your diamond; I'll keep them.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Jove!
    Once more let me behold it: is it that
    Which I left with her?

43 II / 4
  • May be she pluck'd it off
    To send it me.
  • May be she pluck'd it off
    To send it me.
  • Iachimo. Sir--I thank her--that:
    She stripp'd it from her arm; I see her yet;
    Her pretty action did outsell her gift,
    And yet enrich'd it too: she gave it me, and said
    She prized it once.

    Posthumus Leonatus. May be she pluck'd it off
    To send it me.

44 II / 4
  • O, no, no, no! 'tis true. Here, take this too;
    [Gives the ring]
    It is a...
  • O, no, no, no! 'tis true. Here, take this too;
    [Gives the ring]
    It is a basilisk unto mine eye,
    Kills me to look on't. Let there be no honour
    Where there is beauty; truth, where semblance; love,
    Where there's another man: the vows of women
    Of no more bondage be, to where they are made,
    Than they are to their virtues; which is nothing.
    O, above measure false!
  • Iachimo. She writes so to you, doth she?

    Posthumus Leonatus. O, no, no, no! 'tis true. Here, take this too;
    [Gives the ring]
    It is a basilisk unto mine eye,
    Kills me to look on't. Let there be no honour
    Where there is beauty; truth, where semblance; love,
    Where there's another man: the vows of women
    Of no more bondage be, to where they are made,
    Than they are to their virtues; which is nothing.
    O, above measure false!

45 II / 4
  • Very true;
    And so, I hope, he came by't. Back my ring:
    Render to me some...
  • Very true;
    And so, I hope, he came by't. Back my ring:
    Render to me some corporal sign about her,
    More evident than this; for this was stolen.
  • Philario. Have patience, sir,
    And take your ring again; 'tis not yet won:
    It may be probable she lost it; or
    Who knows if one of her women, being corrupted,
    Hath stol'n it from her?

    Posthumus Leonatus. Very true;
    And so, I hope, he came by't. Back my ring:
    Render to me some corporal sign about her,
    More evident than this; for this was stolen.

46 II / 4
  • Hark you, he swears; by Jupiter he swears.
    'Tis true:--nay, keep the ring--'...
  • Hark you, he swears; by Jupiter he swears.
    'Tis true:--nay, keep the ring--'tis true: I am sure
    She would not lose it: her attendants are
    All sworn and honourable:--they induced to steal it!
    And by a stranger!--No, he hath enjoyed her:
    The cognizance of her incontinency
    Is this: she hath bought the name of whore
    thus dearly.
    There, take thy hire; and all the fiends of hell
    Divide themselves between you!
  • Iachimo. By Jupiter, I had it from her arm.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Hark you, he swears; by Jupiter he swears.
    'Tis true:--nay, keep the ring--'tis true: I am sure
    She would not lose it: her attendants are
    All sworn and honourable:--they induced to steal it!
    And by a stranger!--No, he hath enjoyed her:
    The cognizance of her incontinency
    Is this: she hath bought the name of whore
    thus dearly.
    There, take thy hire; and all the fiends of hell
    Divide themselves between you!

47 II / 4
  • Never talk on't;
    She hath been colted by him.
  • Never talk on't;
    She hath been colted by him.
  • Philario. Sir, be patient:
    This is not strong enough to be believed
    Of one persuaded well of--

    Posthumus Leonatus. Never talk on't;
    She hath been colted by him.

48 II / 4
  • Ay, and it doth confirm
    Another stain, as big as hell can hold,
    Were the...
  • Ay, and it doth confirm
    Another stain, as big as hell can hold,
    Were there no more but it.
  • Iachimo. If you seek
    For further satisfying, under her breast--
    Worthy the pressing--lies a mole, right proud
    Of that most delicate lodging: by my life,
    I kiss'd it; and it gave me present hunger
    To feed again, though full. You do remember
    This stain upon her?

    Posthumus Leonatus. Ay, and it doth confirm
    Another stain, as big as hell can hold,
    Were there no more but it.

49 II / 4
  • Spare your arithmetic: never count the turns;
    Once, and a million!
  • Spare your arithmetic: never count the turns;
    Once, and a million!
  • Iachimo. Will you hear more?

    Posthumus Leonatus. Spare your arithmetic: never count the turns;
    Once, and a million!

50 II / 4
  • No swearing.
    If you will swear you have not done't, you lie;
    And I will...
  • No swearing.
    If you will swear you have not done't, you lie;
    And I will kill thee, if thou dost deny
    Thou'st made me cuckold.
  • Iachimo. I'll be sworn--

    Posthumus Leonatus. No swearing.
    If you will swear you have not done't, you lie;
    And I will kill thee, if thou dost deny
    Thou'st made me cuckold.

51 II / 4
  • O, that I had her here, to tear her limb-meal!
    I will go there and do't, i'...
  • O, that I had her here, to tear her limb-meal!
    I will go there and do't, i' the court, before
    Her father. I'll do something--
  • Iachimo. I'll deny nothing.

    Posthumus Leonatus. O, that I had her here, to tear her limb-meal!
    I will go there and do't, i' the court, before
    Her father. I'll do something--

52 II / 5
  • Is there no way for men to be but women
    Must be half-workers? We are all bas...
  • Is there no way for men to be but women
    Must be half-workers? We are all bastards;
    And that most venerable man which I
    Did call my father, was I know not where
    When I was stamp'd; some coiner with his tools
    Made me a counterfeit: yet my mother seem'd
    The Dian of that time so doth my wife
    The nonpareil of this. O, vengeance, vengeance!
    Me of my lawful pleasure she restrain'd
    And pray'd me oft forbearance; did it with
    A pudency so rosy the sweet view on't
    Might well have warm'd old Saturn; that I thought her
    As chaste as unsunn'd snow. O, all the devils!
    This yellow Iachimo, in an hour,--wast not?--
    Or less,--at first?--perchance he spoke not, but,
    Like a full-acorn'd boar, a German one,
    Cried 'O!' and mounted; found no opposition
    But what he look'd for should oppose and she
    Should from encounter guard. Could I find out
    The woman's part in me! For there's no motion
    That tends to vice in man, but I affirm
    It is the woman's part: be it lying, note it,
    The woman's; flattering, hers; deceiving, hers;
    Lust and rank thoughts, hers, hers; revenges, hers;
    Ambitions, covetings, change of prides, disdain,
    Nice longing, slanders, mutability,
    All faults that may be named, nay, that hell knows,
    Why, hers, in part or all; but rather, all;
    For even to vice
    They are not constant but are changing still
    One vice, but of a minute old, for one
    Not half so old as that. I'll write against them,
    Detest them, curse them: yet 'tis greater skill
    In a true hate, to pray they have their will:
    The very devils cannot plague them better.
  • Iachimo. With an my heart.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Is there no way for men to be but women
    Must be half-workers? We are all bastards;
    And that most venerable man which I
    Did call my father, was I know not where
    When I was stamp'd; some coiner with his tools
    Made me a counterfeit: yet my mother seem'd
    The Dian of that time so doth my wife
    The nonpareil of this. O, vengeance, vengeance!
    Me of my lawful pleasure she restrain'd
    And pray'd me oft forbearance; did it with
    A pudency so rosy the sweet view on't
    Might well have warm'd old Saturn; that I thought her
    As chaste as unsunn'd snow. O, all the devils!
    This yellow Iachimo, in an hour,--wast not?--
    Or less,--at first?--perchance he spoke not, but,
    Like a full-acorn'd boar, a German one,
    Cried 'O!' and mounted; found no opposition
    But what he look'd for should oppose and she
    Should from encounter guard. Could I find out
    The woman's part in me! For there's no motion
    That tends to vice in man, but I affirm
    It is the woman's part: be it lying, note it,
    The woman's; flattering, hers; deceiving, hers;
    Lust and rank thoughts, hers, hers; revenges, hers;
    Ambitions, covetings, change of prides, disdain,
    Nice longing, slanders, mutability,
    All faults that may be named, nay, that hell knows,
    Why, hers, in part or all; but rather, all;
    For even to vice
    They are not constant but are changing still
    One vice, but of a minute old, for one
    Not half so old as that. I'll write against them,
    Detest them, curse them: yet 'tis greater skill
    In a true hate, to pray they have their will:
    The very devils cannot plague them better.

53 V / 1
  • Yea, bloody cloth, I'll keep thee, for I wish'd
    Thou shouldst be colour'd th...
  • Yea, bloody cloth, I'll keep thee, for I wish'd
    Thou shouldst be colour'd thus. You married ones,
    If each of you should take this course, how many
    Must murder wives much better than themselves
    For wrying but a little! O Pisanio!
    Every good servant does not all commands:
    No bond but to do just ones. Gods! if you
    Should have ta'en vengeance on my faults, I never
    Had lived to put on this: so had you saved
    The noble Imogen to repent, and struck
    Me, wretch more worth your vengeance. But, alack,
    You snatch some hence for little faults; that's love,
    To have them fall no more: you some permit
    To second ills with ills, each elder worse,
    And make them dread it, to the doers' thrift.
    But Imogen is your own: do your best wills,
    And make me blest to obey! I am brought hither
    Among the Italian gentry, and to fight
    Against my lady's kingdom: 'tis enough
    That, Britain, I have kill'd thy mistress; peace!
    I'll give no wound to thee. Therefore, good heavens,
    Hear patiently my purpose: I'll disrobe me
    Of these Italian weeds and suit myself
    As does a Briton peasant: so I'll fight
    Against the part I come with; so I'll die
    For thee, O Imogen, even for whom my life
    Is every breath a death; and thus, unknown,
    Pitied nor hated, to the face of peril
    Myself I'll dedicate. Let me make men know
    More valour in me than my habits show.
    Gods, put the strength o' the Leonati in me!
    To shame the guise o' the world, I will begin
    The fashion, less without and more within.
  • Belarius. No reason I, since of your lives you set
    So slight a valuation, should reserve
    My crack'd one to more care. Have with you, boys!
    If in your country wars you chance to die,
    That is my bed too, lads, an there I'll lie:
    Lead, lead.
    [Aside]
    The time seems long; their blood
    thinks scorn,
    Till it fly out and show them princes born.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Yea, bloody cloth, I'll keep thee, for I wish'd
    Thou shouldst be colour'd thus. You married ones,
    If each of you should take this course, how many
    Must murder wives much better than themselves
    For wrying but a little! O Pisanio!
    Every good servant does not all commands:
    No bond but to do just ones. Gods! if you
    Should have ta'en vengeance on my faults, I never
    Had lived to put on this: so had you saved
    The noble Imogen to repent, and struck
    Me, wretch more worth your vengeance. But, alack,
    You snatch some hence for little faults; that's love,
    To have them fall no more: you some permit
    To second ills with ills, each elder worse,
    And make them dread it, to the doers' thrift.
    But Imogen is your own: do your best wills,
    And make me blest to obey! I am brought hither
    Among the Italian gentry, and to fight
    Against my lady's kingdom: 'tis enough
    That, Britain, I have kill'd thy mistress; peace!
    I'll give no wound to thee. Therefore, good heavens,
    Hear patiently my purpose: I'll disrobe me
    Of these Italian weeds and suit myself
    As does a Briton peasant: so I'll fight
    Against the part I come with; so I'll die
    For thee, O Imogen, even for whom my life
    Is every breath a death; and thus, unknown,
    Pitied nor hated, to the face of peril
    Myself I'll dedicate. Let me make men know
    More valour in me than my habits show.
    Gods, put the strength o' the Leonati in me!
    To shame the guise o' the world, I will begin
    The fashion, less without and more within.

54 V / 3
  • I did.
    Though you, it seems, come from the fliers.
  • I did.
    Though you, it seems, come from the fliers.
  • Lord. Camest thou from where they made the stand?

    Posthumus Leonatus. I did.
    Though you, it seems, come from the fliers.

55 V / 3
  • No blame be to you, sir; for all was lost,
    But that the heavens fought: the...
  • No blame be to you, sir; for all was lost,
    But that the heavens fought: the king himself
    Of his wings destitute, the army broken,
    And but the backs of Britons seen, all flying
    Through a straight lane; the enemy full-hearted,
    Lolling the tongue with slaughtering, having work
    More plentiful than tools to do't, struck down
    Some mortally, some slightly touch'd, some falling
    Merely through fear; that the straight pass was damm'd
    With dead men hurt behind, and cowards living
    To die with lengthen'd shame.
  • Lord. I did.

    Posthumus Leonatus. No blame be to you, sir; for all was lost,
    But that the heavens fought: the king himself
    Of his wings destitute, the army broken,
    And but the backs of Britons seen, all flying
    Through a straight lane; the enemy full-hearted,
    Lolling the tongue with slaughtering, having work
    More plentiful than tools to do't, struck down
    Some mortally, some slightly touch'd, some falling
    Merely through fear; that the straight pass was damm'd
    With dead men hurt behind, and cowards living
    To die with lengthen'd shame.

56 V / 3
  • Close by the battle, ditch'd, and wall'd with turf;
    Which gave advantage to...
  • Close by the battle, ditch'd, and wall'd with turf;
    Which gave advantage to an ancient soldier,
    An honest one, I warrant; who deserved
    So long a breeding as his white beard came to,
    In doing this for's country: athwart the lane,
    He, with two striplings-lads more like to run
    The country base than to commit such slaughter
    With faces fit for masks, or rather fairer
    Than those for preservation cased, or shame--
    Made good the passage; cried to those that fled,
    'Our Britain s harts die flying, not our men:
    To darkness fleet souls that fly backwards. Stand;
    Or we are Romans and will give you that
    Like beasts which you shun beastly, and may save,
    But to look back in frown: stand, stand.'
    These three,
    Three thousand confident, in act as many--
    For three performers are the file when all
    The rest do nothing--with this word 'Stand, stand,'
    Accommodated by the place, more charming
    With their own nobleness, which could have turn'd
    A distaff to a lance, gilded pale looks,
    Part shame, part spirit renew'd; that some,
    turn'd coward
    But by example--O, a sin in war,
    Damn'd in the first beginners!--gan to look
    The way that they did, and to grin like lions
    Upon the pikes o' the hunters. Then began
    A stop i' the chaser, a retire, anon
    A rout, confusion thick; forthwith they fly
    Chickens, the way which they stoop'd eagles; slaves,
    The strides they victors made: and now our cowards,
    Like fragments in hard voyages, became
    The life o' the need: having found the backdoor open
    Of the unguarded hearts, heavens, how they wound!
    Some slain before; some dying; some their friends
    O'er borne i' the former wave: ten, chased by one,
    Are now each one the slaughter-man of twenty:
    Those that would die or ere resist are grown
    The mortal bugs o' the field.
  • Lord. Where was this lane?

    Posthumus Leonatus. Close by the battle, ditch'd, and wall'd with turf;
    Which gave advantage to an ancient soldier,
    An honest one, I warrant; who deserved
    So long a breeding as his white beard came to,
    In doing this for's country: athwart the lane,
    He, with two striplings-lads more like to run
    The country base than to commit such slaughter
    With faces fit for masks, or rather fairer
    Than those for preservation cased, or shame--
    Made good the passage; cried to those that fled,
    'Our Britain s harts die flying, not our men:
    To darkness fleet souls that fly backwards. Stand;
    Or we are Romans and will give you that
    Like beasts which you shun beastly, and may save,
    But to look back in frown: stand, stand.'
    These three,
    Three thousand confident, in act as many--
    For three performers are the file when all
    The rest do nothing--with this word 'Stand, stand,'
    Accommodated by the place, more charming
    With their own nobleness, which could have turn'd
    A distaff to a lance, gilded pale looks,
    Part shame, part spirit renew'd; that some,
    turn'd coward
    But by example--O, a sin in war,
    Damn'd in the first beginners!--gan to look
    The way that they did, and to grin like lions
    Upon the pikes o' the hunters. Then began
    A stop i' the chaser, a retire, anon
    A rout, confusion thick; forthwith they fly
    Chickens, the way which they stoop'd eagles; slaves,
    The strides they victors made: and now our cowards,
    Like fragments in hard voyages, became
    The life o' the need: having found the backdoor open
    Of the unguarded hearts, heavens, how they wound!
    Some slain before; some dying; some their friends
    O'er borne i' the former wave: ten, chased by one,
    Are now each one the slaughter-man of twenty:
    Those that would die or ere resist are grown
    The mortal bugs o' the field.

57 V / 3
  • Nay, do not wonder at it: you are made
    Rather to wonder at the things you he...
  • Nay, do not wonder at it: you are made
    Rather to wonder at the things you hear
    Than to work any. Will you rhyme upon't,
    And vent it for a mockery? Here is one:
    'Two boys, an old man twice a boy, a lane,
    Preserved the Britons, was the Romans' bane.'
  • Lord. This was strange chance
    A narrow lane, an old man, and two boys.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Nay, do not wonder at it: you are made
    Rather to wonder at the things you hear
    Than to work any. Will you rhyme upon't,
    And vent it for a mockery? Here is one:
    'Two boys, an old man twice a boy, a lane,
    Preserved the Britons, was the Romans' bane.'

58 V / 3
  • 'Lack, to what end?
    Who dares not stand his foe, I'll be his friend;
    For...
  • 'Lack, to what end?
    Who dares not stand his foe, I'll be his friend;
    For if he'll do as he is made to do,
    I know he'll quickly fly my friendship too.
    You have put me into rhyme.
  • Lord. Nay, be not angry, sir.

    Posthumus Leonatus. 'Lack, to what end?
    Who dares not stand his foe, I'll be his friend;
    For if he'll do as he is made to do,
    I know he'll quickly fly my friendship too.
    You have put me into rhyme.

59 V / 3
  • Still going?
    [Exit Lord]
    This is a lord! O noble misery,
    To be i' th...
  • Still going?
    [Exit Lord]
    This is a lord! O noble misery,
    To be i' the field, and ask 'what news?' of me!
    To-day how many would have given their honours
    To have saved their carcasses! took heel to do't,
    And yet died too! I, in mine own woe charm'd,
    Could not find death where I did hear him groan,
    Nor feel him where he struck: being an ugly monster,
    'Tis strange he hides him in fresh cups, soft beds,
    Sweet words; or hath more ministers than we
    That draw his knives i' the war. Well, I will find him
    For being now a favourer to the Briton,
    No more a Briton, I have resumed again
    The part I came in: fight I will no more,
    But yield me to the veriest hind that shall
    Once touch my shoulder. Great the slaughter is
    Here made by the Roman; great the answer be
    Britons must take. For me, my ransom's death;
    On either side I come to spend my breath;
    Which neither here I'll keep nor bear again,
    But end it by some means for Imogen.
  • Lord. Farewell; you're angry.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Still going?
    [Exit Lord]
    This is a lord! O noble misery,
    To be i' the field, and ask 'what news?' of me!
    To-day how many would have given their honours
    To have saved their carcasses! took heel to do't,
    And yet died too! I, in mine own woe charm'd,
    Could not find death where I did hear him groan,
    Nor feel him where he struck: being an ugly monster,
    'Tis strange he hides him in fresh cups, soft beds,
    Sweet words; or hath more ministers than we
    That draw his knives i' the war. Well, I will find him
    For being now a favourer to the Briton,
    No more a Briton, I have resumed again
    The part I came in: fight I will no more,
    But yield me to the veriest hind that shall
    Once touch my shoulder. Great the slaughter is
    Here made by the Roman; great the answer be
    Britons must take. For me, my ransom's death;
    On either side I come to spend my breath;
    Which neither here I'll keep nor bear again,
    But end it by some means for Imogen.

60 V / 3
  • A Roman,
    Who had not now been drooping here, if seconds
    Had answer'd him...
  • A Roman,
    Who had not now been drooping here, if seconds
    Had answer'd him.
  • First British Captain. So 'tis reported:
    But none of 'em can be found. Stand! who's there?

    Posthumus Leonatus. A Roman,
    Who had not now been drooping here, if seconds
    Had answer'd him.

61 V / 4
  • Most welcome, bondage! for thou art away,
    think, to liberty: yet am I better...
  • Most welcome, bondage! for thou art away,
    think, to liberty: yet am I better
    Than one that's sick o' the gout; since he had rather
    Groan so in perpetuity than be cured
    By the sure physician, death, who is the key
    To unbar these locks. My conscience, thou art fetter'd
    More than my shanks and wrists: you good gods, give me
    The penitent instrument to pick that bolt,
    Then, free for ever! Is't enough I am sorry?
    So children temporal fathers do appease;
    Gods are more full of mercy. Must I repent?
    I cannot do it better than in gyves,
    Desired more than constrain'd: to satisfy,
    If of my freedom 'tis the main part, take
    No stricter render of me than my all.
    I know you are more clement than vile men,
    Who of their broken debtors take a third,
    A sixth, a tenth, letting them thrive again
    On their abatement: that's not my desire:
    For Imogen's dear life take mine; and though
    'Tis not so dear, yet 'tis a life; you coin'd it:
    'Tween man and man they weigh not every stamp;
    Though light, take pieces for the figure's sake:
    You rather mine, being yours: and so, great powers,
    If you will take this audit, take this life,
    And cancel these cold bonds. O Imogen!
    I'll speak to thee in silence.
    [Sleeps]
    [Solemn music. Enter, as in an apparition,]
    SICILIUS LEONATUS, father to Posthumus Leonatus,
    an old man, attired like a warrior; leading in
    his hand an ancient matron, his wife, and mother
    to Posthumus Leonatus, with music before them:
    then, after other music, follow the two young
    Leonati, brothers to Posthumus Leonatus, with
    wounds as they died in the wars. They circle
    Posthumus Leonatus round, as he lies sleeping]
  • Second Gaoler. Ay, or a stomach.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Most welcome, bondage! for thou art away,
    think, to liberty: yet am I better
    Than one that's sick o' the gout; since he had rather
    Groan so in perpetuity than be cured
    By the sure physician, death, who is the key
    To unbar these locks. My conscience, thou art fetter'd
    More than my shanks and wrists: you good gods, give me
    The penitent instrument to pick that bolt,
    Then, free for ever! Is't enough I am sorry?
    So children temporal fathers do appease;
    Gods are more full of mercy. Must I repent?
    I cannot do it better than in gyves,
    Desired more than constrain'd: to satisfy,
    If of my freedom 'tis the main part, take
    No stricter render of me than my all.
    I know you are more clement than vile men,
    Who of their broken debtors take a third,
    A sixth, a tenth, letting them thrive again
    On their abatement: that's not my desire:
    For Imogen's dear life take mine; and though
    'Tis not so dear, yet 'tis a life; you coin'd it:
    'Tween man and man they weigh not every stamp;
    Though light, take pieces for the figure's sake:
    You rather mine, being yours: and so, great powers,
    If you will take this audit, take this life,
    And cancel these cold bonds. O Imogen!
    I'll speak to thee in silence.
    [Sleeps]
    [Solemn music. Enter, as in an apparition,]
    SICILIUS LEONATUS, father to Posthumus Leonatus,
    an old man, attired like a warrior; leading in
    his hand an ancient matron, his wife, and mother
    to Posthumus Leonatus, with music before them:
    then, after other music, follow the two young
    Leonati, brothers to Posthumus Leonatus, with
    wounds as they died in the wars. They circle
    Posthumus Leonatus round, as he lies sleeping]

62 V / 4
  • [Waking] Sleep, thou hast been a grandsire, and begot
    A father to me; and th...
  • [Waking] Sleep, thou hast been a grandsire, and begot
    A father to me; and thou hast created
    A mother and two brothers: but, O scorn!
    Gone! they went hence so soon as they were born:
    And so I am awake. Poor wretches that depend
    On greatness' favour dream as I have done,
    Wake and find nothing. But, alas, I swerve:
    Many dream not to find, neither deserve,
    And yet are steep'd in favours: so am I,
    That have this golden chance and know not why.
    What fairies haunt this ground? A book? O rare one!
    Be not, as is our fangled world, a garment
    Nobler than that it covers: let thy effects
    So follow, to be most unlike our courtiers,
    As good as promise.
    [Reads]
    'When as a lion's whelp shall, to himself unknown,
    without seeking find, and be embraced by a piece of
    tender air; and when from a stately cedar shall be
    lopped branches, which, being dead many years,
    shall after revive, be jointed to the old stock and
    freshly grow; then shall Posthumus end his miseries,
    Britain be fortunate and flourish in peace and plenty.'
    'Tis still a dream, or else such stuff as madmen
    Tongue and brain not; either both or nothing;
    Or senseless speaking or a speaking such
    As sense cannot untie. Be what it is,
    The action of my life is like it, which
    I'll keep, if but for sympathy.
  • Sicilius Leonatus. The marble pavement closes, he is enter'd
    His radiant root. Away! and, to be blest,
    Let us with care perform his great behest.

    Posthumus Leonatus. [Waking] Sleep, thou hast been a grandsire, and begot
    A father to me; and thou hast created
    A mother and two brothers: but, O scorn!
    Gone! they went hence so soon as they were born:
    And so I am awake. Poor wretches that depend
    On greatness' favour dream as I have done,
    Wake and find nothing. But, alas, I swerve:
    Many dream not to find, neither deserve,
    And yet are steep'd in favours: so am I,
    That have this golden chance and know not why.
    What fairies haunt this ground? A book? O rare one!
    Be not, as is our fangled world, a garment
    Nobler than that it covers: let thy effects
    So follow, to be most unlike our courtiers,
    As good as promise.
    [Reads]
    'When as a lion's whelp shall, to himself unknown,
    without seeking find, and be embraced by a piece of
    tender air; and when from a stately cedar shall be
    lopped branches, which, being dead many years,
    shall after revive, be jointed to the old stock and
    freshly grow; then shall Posthumus end his miseries,
    Britain be fortunate and flourish in peace and plenty.'
    'Tis still a dream, or else such stuff as madmen
    Tongue and brain not; either both or nothing;
    Or senseless speaking or a speaking such
    As sense cannot untie. Be what it is,
    The action of my life is like it, which
    I'll keep, if but for sympathy.

63 V / 4
  • Over-roasted rather; ready long ago.
  • Over-roasted rather; ready long ago.
  • First Gaoler. Come, sir, are you ready for death?

    Posthumus Leonatus. Over-roasted rather; ready long ago.

64 V / 4
  • So, if I prove a good repast to the
    spectators, the dish pays the shot.
  • So, if I prove a good repast to the
    spectators, the dish pays the shot.
  • First Gaoler. Hanging is the word, sir: if
    you be ready for that, you are well cooked.

    Posthumus Leonatus. So, if I prove a good repast to the
    spectators, the dish pays the shot.

65 V / 4
  • I am merrier to die than thou art to live.
  • I am merrier to die than thou art to live.
  • First Gaoler. A heavy reckoning for you, sir. But the comfort is,
    you shall be called to no more payments, fear no
    more tavern-bills; which are often the sadness of
    parting, as the procuring of mirth: you come in
    flint for want of meat, depart reeling with too
    much drink; sorry that you have paid too much, and
    sorry that you are paid too much; purse and brain
    both empty; the brain the heavier for being too
    light, the purse too light, being drawn of
    heaviness: of this contradiction you shall now be
    quit. O, the charity of a penny cord! It sums up
    thousands in a trice: you have no true debitor and
    creditor but it; of what's past, is, and to come,
    the discharge: your neck, sir, is pen, book and
    counters; so the acquittance follows.

    Posthumus Leonatus. I am merrier to die than thou art to live.

66 V / 4
  • Yes, indeed do I, fellow.
  • Yes, indeed do I, fellow.
  • First Gaoler. Indeed, sir, he that sleeps feels not the
    tooth-ache: but a man that were to sleep your
    sleep, and a hangman to help him to bed, I think he
    would change places with his officer; for, look you,
    sir, you know not which way you shall go.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Yes, indeed do I, fellow.

67 V / 4
  • I tell thee, fellow, there are none want eyes to
    direct them the way I am go...
  • I tell thee, fellow, there are none want eyes to
    direct them the way I am going, but such as wink and
    will not use them.
  • First Gaoler. Your death has eyes in 's head then; I have not seen
    him so pictured: you must either be directed by
    some that take upon them to know, or do take upon
    yourself that which I am sure you do not know, or
    jump the after inquiry on your own peril: and how
    you shall speed in your journey's end, I think you'll
    never return to tell one.

    Posthumus Leonatus. I tell thee, fellow, there are none want eyes to
    direct them the way I am going, but such as wink and
    will not use them.

68 V / 4
  • Thou bring'st good news; I am called to be made free.
  • Thou bring'st good news; I am called to be made free.
  • Messenger. Knock off his manacles; bring your prisoner to the king.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Thou bring'st good news; I am called to be made free.

69 V / 4
  • Thou shalt be then freer than a gaoler; no bolts for the dead.
  • Thou shalt be then freer than a gaoler; no bolts for the dead.
  • First Gaoler. I'll be hang'd then.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Thou shalt be then freer than a gaoler; no bolts for the dead.

70 V / 5
  • [Aside] What's that to him?
  • [Aside] What's that to him?
  • Imogen. My boon is, that this gentleman may render
    Of whom he had this ring.

    Posthumus Leonatus. [Aside] What's that to him?

71 V / 5
  • [Advancing] Ay, so thou dost,
    Italian fiend! Ay me, most credulous fool,
  • [Advancing] Ay, so thou dost,
    Italian fiend! Ay me, most credulous fool,
    Egregious murderer, thief, any thing
    That's due to all the villains past, in being,
    To come! O, give me cord, or knife, or poison,
    Some upright justicer! Thou, king, send out
    For torturers ingenious: it is I
    That all the abhorred things o' the earth amend
    By being worse than they. I am Posthumus,
    That kill'd thy daughter:--villain-like, I lie--
    That caused a lesser villain than myself,
    A sacrilegious thief, to do't: the temple
    Of virtue was she; yea, and she herself.
    Spit, and throw stones, cast mire upon me, set
    The dogs o' the street to bay me: every villain
    Be call'd Posthumus Leonitus; and
    Be villany less than 'twas! O Imogen!
    My queen, my life, my wife! O Imogen,
    Imogen, Imogen!
  • Iachimo. Your daughter's chastity--there it begins.
    He spake of her, as Dian had hot dreams,
    And she alone were cold: whereat I, wretch,
    Made scruple of his praise; and wager'd with him
    Pieces of gold 'gainst this which then he wore
    Upon his honour'd finger, to attain
    In suit the place of's bed and win this ring
    By hers and mine adultery. He, true knight,
    No lesser of her honour confident
    Than I did truly find her, stakes this ring;
    And would so, had it been a carbuncle
    Of Phoebus' wheel, and might so safely, had it
    Been all the worth of's car. Away to Britain
    Post I in this design: well may you, sir,
    Remember me at court; where I was taught
    Of your chaste daughter the wide difference
    'Twixt amorous and villanous. Being thus quench'd
    Of hope, not longing, mine Italian brain
    'Gan in your duller Britain operate
    Most vilely; for my vantage, excellent:
    And, to be brief, my practise so prevail'd,
    That I return'd with simular proof enough
    To make the noble Leonatus mad,
    By wounding his belief in her renown
    With tokens thus, and thus; averting notes
    Of chamber-hanging, pictures, this her bracelet,--
    O cunning, how I got it!--nay, some marks
    Of secret on her person, that he could not
    But think her bond of chastity quite crack'd,
    I having ta'en the forfeit. Whereupon--
    Methinks, I see him now--

    Posthumus Leonatus. [Advancing] Ay, so thou dost,
    Italian fiend! Ay me, most credulous fool,
    Egregious murderer, thief, any thing
    That's due to all the villains past, in being,
    To come! O, give me cord, or knife, or poison,
    Some upright justicer! Thou, king, send out
    For torturers ingenious: it is I
    That all the abhorred things o' the earth amend
    By being worse than they. I am Posthumus,
    That kill'd thy daughter:--villain-like, I lie--
    That caused a lesser villain than myself,
    A sacrilegious thief, to do't: the temple
    Of virtue was she; yea, and she herself.
    Spit, and throw stones, cast mire upon me, set
    The dogs o' the street to bay me: every villain
    Be call'd Posthumus Leonitus; and
    Be villany less than 'twas! O Imogen!
    My queen, my life, my wife! O Imogen,
    Imogen, Imogen!

72 V / 5
  • Shall's have a play of this? Thou scornful page,
    There lie thy part.
  • Shall's have a play of this? Thou scornful page,
    There lie thy part.
  • Imogen. Peace, my lord; hear, hear--

    Posthumus Leonatus. Shall's have a play of this? Thou scornful page,
    There lie thy part.

73 V / 5
  • How come these staggers on me?
  • How come these staggers on me?
  • Cymbeline. Does the world go round?

    Posthumus Leonatus. How come these staggers on me?

74 V / 5
  • Hang there like a fruit, my soul,
    Till the tree die!
  • Hang there like a fruit, my soul,
    Till the tree die!
  • Imogen. Why did you throw your wedded lady from you?
    Think that you are upon a rock; and now
    Throw me again.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Hang there like a fruit, my soul,
    Till the tree die!

75 V / 5
  • I am, sir,
    The soldier that did company these three
    In poor beseeming; '...
  • I am, sir,
    The soldier that did company these three
    In poor beseeming; 'twas a fitment for
    The purpose I then follow'd. That I was he,
    Speak, Iachimo: I had you down and might
    Have made you finish.
  • Cymbeline. The forlorn soldier, that so nobly fought,
    He would have well becomed this place, and graced
    The thankings of a king.

    Posthumus Leonatus. I am, sir,
    The soldier that did company these three
    In poor beseeming; 'twas a fitment for
    The purpose I then follow'd. That I was he,
    Speak, Iachimo: I had you down and might
    Have made you finish.

76 V / 5
  • Kneel not to me:
    The power that I have on you is, to spare you;
    The mali...
  • Kneel not to me:
    The power that I have on you is, to spare you;
    The malice towards you to forgive you: live,
    And deal with others better.
  • Iachimo. [Kneeling] I am down again:
    But now my heavy conscience sinks my knee,
    As then your force did. Take that life, beseech you,
    Which I so often owe: but your ring first;
    And here the bracelet of the truest princess
    That ever swore her faith.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Kneel not to me:
    The power that I have on you is, to spare you;
    The malice towards you to forgive you: live,
    And deal with others better.

77 V / 5
  • Your servant, princes. Good my lord of Rome,
    Call forth your soothsayer: as...
  • Your servant, princes. Good my lord of Rome,
    Call forth your soothsayer: as I slept, methought
    Great Jupiter, upon his eagle back'd,
    Appear'd to me, with other spritely shows
    Of mine own kindred: when I waked, I found
    This label on my bosom; whose containing
    Is so from sense in hardness, that I can
    Make no collection of it: let him show
    His skill in the construction.
  • Arviragus. You holp us, sir,
    As you did mean indeed to be our brother;
    Joy'd are we that you are.

    Posthumus Leonatus. Your servant, princes. Good my lord of Rome,
    Call forth your soothsayer: as I slept, methought
    Great Jupiter, upon his eagle back'd,
    Appear'd to me, with other spritely shows
    Of mine own kindred: when I waked, I found
    This label on my bosom; whose containing
    Is so from sense in hardness, that I can
    Make no collection of it: let him show
    His skill in the construction.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.