Speeches (Lines) for Quintus in "Titus Andronicus"

Total: 11
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • And shall, or him we will accompany.
  • And shall, or him we will accompany.
  • Marcus Andronicus. My lord, this is impiety in you:
    My nephew Mutius' deeds do plead for him
    He must be buried with his brethren.

    Quintus. And shall, or him we will accompany.

2 I / 1
  • He that would vouch it in any place but here.
  • He that would vouch it in any place but here.
  • Titus Andronicus. 'And shall!' what villain was it that spake
    that word?

    Quintus. He that would vouch it in any place but here.

3 I / 1
  • Not I, till Mutius' bones be buried.
  • Not I, till Mutius' bones be buried.
  • Martius. He is not with himself; let us withdraw.

    Quintus. Not I, till Mutius' bones be buried.

4 I / 1
  • Father, and in that name doth nature speak,--
  • Father, and in that name doth nature speak,--
  • Marcus Andronicus. Brother, for in that name doth nature plead,--

    Quintus. Father, and in that name doth nature speak,--

5 II / 3
  • My sight is very dull, whate'er it bodes.
  • My sight is very dull, whate'er it bodes.
  • Aaron. Come on, my lords, the better foot before:
    Straight will I bring you to the loathsome pit
    Where I espied the panther fast asleep.

    Quintus. My sight is very dull, whate'er it bodes.

6 II / 3
  • What art thou fall'n? What subtle hole is this,
    Whose mouth is cover'd with...
  • What art thou fall'n? What subtle hole is this,
    Whose mouth is cover'd with rude-growing briers,
    Upon whose leaves are drops of new-shed blood
    As fresh as morning dew distill'd on flowers?
    A very fatal place it seems to me.
    Speak, brother, hast thou hurt thee with the fall?
  • Martius. And mine, I promise you; were't not for shame,
    Well could I leave our sport to sleep awhile.

    Quintus. What art thou fall'n? What subtle hole is this,
    Whose mouth is cover'd with rude-growing briers,
    Upon whose leaves are drops of new-shed blood
    As fresh as morning dew distill'd on flowers?
    A very fatal place it seems to me.
    Speak, brother, hast thou hurt thee with the fall?

7 II / 3
  • I am surprised with an uncouth fear;
    A chilling sweat o'er-runs my trembling...
  • I am surprised with an uncouth fear;
    A chilling sweat o'er-runs my trembling joints:
    My heart suspects more than mine eye can see.
  • Martius. Why dost not comfort me, and help me out
    From this unhallowed and blood-stained hole?

    Quintus. I am surprised with an uncouth fear;
    A chilling sweat o'er-runs my trembling joints:
    My heart suspects more than mine eye can see.

8 II / 3
  • Aaron is gone; and my compassionate heart
    Will not permit mine eyes once to...
  • Aaron is gone; and my compassionate heart
    Will not permit mine eyes once to behold
    The thing whereat it trembles by surmise;
    O, tell me how it is; for ne'er till now
    Was I a child to fear I know not what.
  • Martius. To prove thou hast a true-divining heart,
    Aaron and thou look down into this den,
    And see a fearful sight of blood and death.

    Quintus. Aaron is gone; and my compassionate heart
    Will not permit mine eyes once to behold
    The thing whereat it trembles by surmise;
    O, tell me how it is; for ne'er till now
    Was I a child to fear I know not what.

9 II / 3
  • If it be dark, how dost thou know 'tis he?
  • If it be dark, how dost thou know 'tis he?
  • Martius. Lord Bassianus lies embrewed here,
    All on a heap, like to a slaughter'd lamb,
    In this detested, dark, blood-drinking pit.

    Quintus. If it be dark, how dost thou know 'tis he?

10 II / 3
  • Reach me thy hand, that I may help thee out;
    Or, wanting strength to do thee...
  • Reach me thy hand, that I may help thee out;
    Or, wanting strength to do thee so much good,
    I may be pluck'd into the swallowing womb
    Of this deep pit, poor Bassianus' grave.
    I have no strength to pluck thee to the brink.
  • Martius. Upon his bloody finger he doth wear
    A precious ring, that lightens all the hole,
    Which, like a taper in some monument,
    Doth shine upon the dead man's earthy cheeks,
    And shows the ragged entrails of the pit:
    So pale did shine the moon on Pyramus
    When he by night lay bathed in maiden blood.
    O brother, help me with thy fainting hand--
    If fear hath made thee faint, as me it hath--
    Out of this fell devouring receptacle,
    As hateful as Cocytus' misty mouth.

    Quintus. Reach me thy hand, that I may help thee out;
    Or, wanting strength to do thee so much good,
    I may be pluck'd into the swallowing womb
    Of this deep pit, poor Bassianus' grave.
    I have no strength to pluck thee to the brink.

11 II / 3
  • Thy hand once more; I will not loose again,
    Till thou art here aloft, or I b...
  • Thy hand once more; I will not loose again,
    Till thou art here aloft, or I below:
    Thou canst not come to me: I come to thee.
  • Martius. Nor I no strength to climb without thy help.

    Quintus. Thy hand once more; I will not loose again,
    Till thou art here aloft, or I below:
    Thou canst not come to me: I come to thee.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.