Speeches (Lines) for Sampson in "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 20
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 16
  • Gregory, o' my word, we'll not carry coals.
  • Gregory, o' my word, we'll not carry coals.
  • (stage directions). [Enter SAMPSON and GREGORY, of the house of Capulet, armed with swords and bucklers]

    Sampson. Gregory, o' my word, we'll not carry coals.

2 I, 1, 19
  • I mean, an we be in choler, we'll draw.
  • I mean, an we be in choler, we'll draw.
  • Gregory. No, for then we should be colliers.

    Sampson. I mean, an we be in choler, we'll draw.

3 I, 1, 21
  • I strike quickly, being moved.
  • I strike quickly, being moved.
  • Gregory. Ay, while you live, draw your neck out o' the collar.

    Sampson. I strike quickly, being moved.

4 I, 1, 23
  • A dog of the house of Montague moves me.
  • A dog of the house of Montague moves me.
  • Gregory. But thou art not quickly moved to strike.

    Sampson. A dog of the house of Montague moves me.

5 I, 1, 26
  • A dog of that house shall move me to stand: I will
    take the wall of any man...
  • A dog of that house shall move me to stand: I will
    take the wall of any man or maid of Montague's.
  • Gregory. To move is to stir; and to be valiant is to stand:
    therefore, if thou art moved, thou runn'st away.

    Sampson. A dog of that house shall move me to stand: I will
    take the wall of any man or maid of Montague's.

6 I, 1, 30
  • True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels,
    are ever thrust to the...
  • True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels,
    are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push
    Montague's men from the wall, and thrust his maids
    to the wall.
  • Gregory. That shows thee a weak slave; for the weakest goes
    to the wall.

    Sampson. True; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels,
    are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push
    Montague's men from the wall, and thrust his maids
    to the wall.

7 I, 1, 35
  • 'Tis all one, I will show myself a tyrant: when I
    have fought with the men,...
  • 'Tis all one, I will show myself a tyrant: when I
    have fought with the men, I will be cruel with the
    maids, and cut off their heads.
  • Gregory. The quarrel is between our masters and us their men.

    Sampson. 'Tis all one, I will show myself a tyrant: when I
    have fought with the men, I will be cruel with the
    maids, and cut off their heads.

8 I, 1, 39
  • Ay, the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads;
    take it in what sense thou...
  • Ay, the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads;
    take it in what sense thou wilt.
  • Gregory. The heads of the maids?

    Sampson. Ay, the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads;
    take it in what sense thou wilt.

9 I, 1, 42
  • Me they shall feel while I am able to stand: and
    'tis known I am a pretty pi...
  • Me they shall feel while I am able to stand: and
    'tis known I am a pretty piece of flesh.
  • Gregory. They must take it in sense that feel it.

    Sampson. Me they shall feel while I am able to stand: and
    'tis known I am a pretty piece of flesh.

10 I, 1, 47
  • My naked weapon is out: quarrel, I will back thee.
  • My naked weapon is out: quarrel, I will back thee.
  • Gregory. 'Tis well thou art not fish; if thou hadst, thou
    hadst been poor John. Draw thy tool! here comes
    two of the house of the Montagues.

    Sampson. My naked weapon is out: quarrel, I will back thee.

11 I, 1, 49
  • Fear me not.
  • Fear me not.
  • Gregory. How! turn thy back and run?

    Sampson. Fear me not.

12 I, 1, 51
  • Let us take the law of our sides; let them begin.
  • Let us take the law of our sides; let them begin.
  • Gregory. No, marry; I fear thee!

    Sampson. Let us take the law of our sides; let them begin.

13 I, 1, 54
  • Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them;
    which is a disgrace to them...
  • Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them;
    which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it.
  • Gregory. I will frown as I pass by, and let them take it as
    they list.

    Sampson. Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them;
    which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it.

14 I, 1, 58
  • I do bite my thumb, sir.
  • I do bite my thumb, sir.
  • Abraham. Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

    Sampson. I do bite my thumb, sir.

15 I, 1, 60
  • [Aside to GREGORY] Is the law of our side, if I say
    ay?
  • [Aside to GREGORY] Is the law of our side, if I say
    ay?
  • Abraham. Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

    Sampson. [Aside to GREGORY] Is the law of our side, if I say
    ay?

16 I, 1, 63
  • No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but I
    bite my thumb, sir.
  • No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but I
    bite my thumb, sir.
  • Gregory. No.

    Sampson. No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but I
    bite my thumb, sir.

17 I, 1, 67
  • If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you.
  • If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you.
  • Abraham. Quarrel sir! no, sir.

    Sampson. If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you.

18 I, 1, 69
  • Well, sir.
  • Well, sir.
  • Abraham. No better.

    Sampson. Well, sir.

19 I, 1, 71
  • Yes, better, sir.
  • Yes, better, sir.
  • Gregory. Say 'better:' here comes one of my master's kinsmen.

    Sampson. Yes, better, sir.

20 I, 1, 73
  • Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.
  • Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.
  • Abraham. You lie.

    Sampson. Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.

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