Speeches (Lines) for Saturninus in "Titus Andronicus"

Total: 49
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Noble patricians, patrons of my right,
    Defend the justice of my cause with a...
  • Noble patricians, patrons of my right,
    Defend the justice of my cause with arms,
    And, countrymen, my loving followers,
    Plead my successive title with your swords:
    I am his first-born son, that was the last
    That wore the imperial diadem of Rome;
    Then let my father's honours live in me,
    Nor wrong mine age with this indignity.
  • .

    Saturninus. Noble patricians, patrons of my right,
    Defend the justice of my cause with arms,
    And, countrymen, my loving followers,
    Plead my successive title with your swords:
    I am his first-born son, that was the last
    That wore the imperial diadem of Rome;
    Then let my father's honours live in me,
    Nor wrong mine age with this indignity.

2 I / 1
  • How fair the tribune speaks to calm my thoughts!
  • How fair the tribune speaks to calm my thoughts!
  • Marcus Andronicus. Princes, that strive by factions and by friends
    Ambitiously for rule and empery,
    Know that the people of Rome, for whom we stand
    A special party, have, by common voice,
    In election for the Roman empery,
    Chosen Andronicus, surnamed Pius
    For many good and great deserts to Rome:
    A nobler man, a braver warrior,
    Lives not this day within the city walls:
    He by the senate is accit'd home
    From weary wars against the barbarous Goths;
    That, with his sons, a terror to our foes,
    Hath yoked a nation strong, train'd up in arms.
    Ten years are spent since first he undertook
    This cause of Rome and chastised with arms
    Our enemies' pride: five times he hath return'd
    Bleeding to Rome, bearing his valiant sons
    In coffins from the field;
    And now at last, laden with horror's spoils,
    Returns the good Andronicus to Rome,
    Renowned Titus, flourishing in arms.
    Let us entreat, by honour of his name,
    Whom worthily you would have now succeed.
    And in the Capitol and senate's right,
    Whom you pretend to honour and adore,
    That you withdraw you and abate your strength;
    Dismiss your followers and, as suitors should,
    Plead your deserts in peace and humbleness.

    Saturninus. How fair the tribune speaks to calm my thoughts!

3 I / 1
  • Friends, that have been thus forward in my right,
    I thank you all and here d...
  • Friends, that have been thus forward in my right,
    I thank you all and here dismiss you all,
    And to the love and favor of my country
    Commit myself, my person and the cause.
    [Exeunt the followers of SATURNINUS]
    Rome, be as just and gracious unto me
    As I am confident and kind to thee.
    Open the gates, and let me in.
  • Bassianus. Marcus Andronicus, so I do ally
    In thy uprightness and integrity,
    And so I love and honour thee and thine,
    Thy noble brother Titus and his sons,
    And her to whom my thoughts are humbled all,
    Gracious Lavinia, Rome's rich ornament,
    That I will here dismiss my loving friends,
    And to my fortunes and the people's favor
    Commit my cause in balance to be weigh'd.

    Saturninus. Friends, that have been thus forward in my right,
    I thank you all and here dismiss you all,
    And to the love and favor of my country
    Commit myself, my person and the cause.
    [Exeunt the followers of SATURNINUS]
    Rome, be as just and gracious unto me
    As I am confident and kind to thee.
    Open the gates, and let me in.

4 I / 1
  • Proud and ambitious tribune, canst thou tell?
  • Proud and ambitious tribune, canst thou tell?
  • Marcus Andronicus. Titus, thou shalt obtain and ask the empery.

    Saturninus. Proud and ambitious tribune, canst thou tell?

5 I / 1
  • Romans, do me right:
    Patricians, draw your swords: and sheathe them not
    ...
  • Romans, do me right:
    Patricians, draw your swords: and sheathe them not
    Till Saturninus be Rome's emperor.
    Andronicus, would thou wert shipp'd to hell,
    Rather than rob me of the people's hearts!
  • Titus Andronicus. Patience, Prince Saturninus.

    Saturninus. Romans, do me right:
    Patricians, draw your swords: and sheathe them not
    Till Saturninus be Rome's emperor.
    Andronicus, would thou wert shipp'd to hell,
    Rather than rob me of the people's hearts!

6 I / 1
  • Titus Andronicus, for thy favors done
    To us in our election this day,
    I...
  • Titus Andronicus, for thy favors done
    To us in our election this day,
    I give thee thanks in part of thy deserts,
    And will with deeds requite thy gentleness:
    And, for an onset, Titus, to advance
    Thy name and honourable family,
    Lavinia will I make my empress,
    Rome's royal mistress, mistress of my heart,
    And in the sacred Pantheon her espouse:
    Tell me, Andronicus, doth this motion please thee?
  • Marcus Andronicus. With voices and applause of every sort,
    Patricians and plebeians, we create
    Lord Saturninus Rome's great emperor,
    And say 'Long live our Emperor Saturnine!'

    Saturninus. Titus Andronicus, for thy favors done
    To us in our election this day,
    I give thee thanks in part of thy deserts,
    And will with deeds requite thy gentleness:
    And, for an onset, Titus, to advance
    Thy name and honourable family,
    Lavinia will I make my empress,
    Rome's royal mistress, mistress of my heart,
    And in the sacred Pantheon her espouse:
    Tell me, Andronicus, doth this motion please thee?

7 I / 1
  • Thanks, noble Titus, father of my life!
    How proud I am of thee and of thy gi...
  • Thanks, noble Titus, father of my life!
    How proud I am of thee and of thy gifts
    Rome shall record, and when I do forget
    The least of these unspeakable deserts,
    Romans, forget your fealty to me.
  • Titus Andronicus. It doth, my worthy lord; and in this match
    I hold me highly honour'd of your grace:
    And here in sight of Rome to Saturnine,
    King and commander of our commonweal,
    The wide world's emperor, do I consecrate
    My sword, my chariot and my prisoners;
    Presents well worthy Rome's imperial lord:
    Receive them then, the tribute that I owe,
    Mine honour's ensigns humbled at thy feet.

    Saturninus. Thanks, noble Titus, father of my life!
    How proud I am of thee and of thy gifts
    Rome shall record, and when I do forget
    The least of these unspeakable deserts,
    Romans, forget your fealty to me.

8 I / 1
  • A goodly lady, trust me; of the hue
    That I would choose, were I to choose an...
  • A goodly lady, trust me; of the hue
    That I would choose, were I to choose anew.
    Clear up, fair queen, that cloudy countenance:
    Though chance of war hath wrought this change of cheer,
    Thou comest not to be made a scorn in Rome:
    Princely shall be thy usage every way.
    Rest on my word, and let not discontent
    Daunt all your hopes: madam, he comforts you
    Can make you greater than the Queen of Goths.
    Lavinia, you are not displeased with this?
  • Titus Andronicus. [To TAMORA] Now, madam, are you prisoner to
    an emperor;
    To him that, for your honour and your state,
    Will use you nobly and your followers.

    Saturninus. A goodly lady, trust me; of the hue
    That I would choose, were I to choose anew.
    Clear up, fair queen, that cloudy countenance:
    Though chance of war hath wrought this change of cheer,
    Thou comest not to be made a scorn in Rome:
    Princely shall be thy usage every way.
    Rest on my word, and let not discontent
    Daunt all your hopes: madam, he comforts you
    Can make you greater than the Queen of Goths.
    Lavinia, you are not displeased with this?

9 I / 1
  • Thanks, sweet Lavinia. Romans, let us go;
    Ransomless here we set our prisone...
  • Thanks, sweet Lavinia. Romans, let us go;
    Ransomless here we set our prisoners free:
    Proclaim our honours, lords, with trump and drum.
  • Lavinia. Not I, my lord; sith true nobility
    Warrants these words in princely courtesy.

    Saturninus. Thanks, sweet Lavinia. Romans, let us go;
    Ransomless here we set our prisoners free:
    Proclaim our honours, lords, with trump and drum.

10 I / 1
  • Surprised! by whom?
  • Surprised! by whom?
  • Titus Andronicus. Traitors, avaunt! Where is the emperor's guard?
    Treason, my lord! Lavinia is surprised!

    Saturninus. Surprised! by whom?

11 I / 1
  • No, Titus, no; the emperor needs her not,
    Nor her, nor thee, nor any of thy...
  • No, Titus, no; the emperor needs her not,
    Nor her, nor thee, nor any of thy stock:
    I'll trust, by leisure, him that mocks me once;
    Thee never, nor thy traitorous haughty sons,
    Confederates all thus to dishonour me.
    Was there none else in Rome to make a stale,
    But Saturnine? Full well, Andronicus,
    Agree these deeds with that proud brag of thine,
    That said'st I begg'd the empire at thy hands.
  • Lucius. Dead, if you will; but not to be his wife,
    That is another's lawful promised love.

    Saturninus. No, Titus, no; the emperor needs her not,
    Nor her, nor thee, nor any of thy stock:
    I'll trust, by leisure, him that mocks me once;
    Thee never, nor thy traitorous haughty sons,
    Confederates all thus to dishonour me.
    Was there none else in Rome to make a stale,
    But Saturnine? Full well, Andronicus,
    Agree these deeds with that proud brag of thine,
    That said'st I begg'd the empire at thy hands.

12 I / 1
  • But go thy ways; go, give that changing piece
    To him that flourish'd for her...
  • But go thy ways; go, give that changing piece
    To him that flourish'd for her with his sword
    A valiant son-in-law thou shalt enjoy;
    One fit to bandy with thy lawless sons,
    To ruffle in the commonwealth of Rome.
  • Titus Andronicus. O monstrous! what reproachful words are these?

    Saturninus. But go thy ways; go, give that changing piece
    To him that flourish'd for her with his sword
    A valiant son-in-law thou shalt enjoy;
    One fit to bandy with thy lawless sons,
    To ruffle in the commonwealth of Rome.

13 I / 1
  • And therefore, lovely Tamora, queen of Goths,
    That like the stately Phoebe '...
  • And therefore, lovely Tamora, queen of Goths,
    That like the stately Phoebe 'mongst her nymphs
    Dost overshine the gallant'st dames of Rome,
    If thou be pleased with this my sudden choice,
    Behold, I choose thee, Tamora, for my bride,
    And will create thee empress of Rome,
    Speak, Queen of Goths, dost thou applaud my choice?
    And here I swear by all the Roman gods,
    Sith priest and holy water are so near
    And tapers burn so bright and every thing
    In readiness for Hymenaeus stand,
    I will not re-salute the streets of Rome,
    Or climb my palace, till from forth this place
    I lead espoused my bride along with me.
  • Titus Andronicus. These words are razors to my wounded heart.

    Saturninus. And therefore, lovely Tamora, queen of Goths,
    That like the stately Phoebe 'mongst her nymphs
    Dost overshine the gallant'st dames of Rome,
    If thou be pleased with this my sudden choice,
    Behold, I choose thee, Tamora, for my bride,
    And will create thee empress of Rome,
    Speak, Queen of Goths, dost thou applaud my choice?
    And here I swear by all the Roman gods,
    Sith priest and holy water are so near
    And tapers burn so bright and every thing
    In readiness for Hymenaeus stand,
    I will not re-salute the streets of Rome,
    Or climb my palace, till from forth this place
    I lead espoused my bride along with me.

14 I / 1
  • Ascend, fair queen, Pantheon. Lords, accompany
    Your noble emperor and his lo...
  • Ascend, fair queen, Pantheon. Lords, accompany
    Your noble emperor and his lovely bride,
    Sent by the heavens for Prince Saturnine,
    Whose wisdom hath her fortune conquered:
    There shall we consummate our spousal rites.
  • Tamora. And here, in sight of heaven, to Rome I swear,
    If Saturnine advance the Queen of Goths,
    She will a handmaid be to his desires,
    A loving nurse, a mother to his youth.

    Saturninus. Ascend, fair queen, Pantheon. Lords, accompany
    Your noble emperor and his lovely bride,
    Sent by the heavens for Prince Saturnine,
    Whose wisdom hath her fortune conquered:
    There shall we consummate our spousal rites.

15 I / 1
  • So, Bassianus, you have play'd your prize:
    God give you joy, sir, of your ga...
  • So, Bassianus, you have play'd your prize:
    God give you joy, sir, of your gallant bride!
  • Titus Andronicus. I know not, Marcus; but I know it is,
    Whether by device or no, the heavens can tell:
    Is she not then beholding to the man
    That brought her for this high good turn so far?
    Yes, and will nobly him remunerate.
    [Flourish. Re-enter, from one side, SATURNINUS]
    attended, TAMORA, DEMETRIUS, CHIRON and AARON; from
    the other, BASSIANUS, LAVINIA, and others]

    Saturninus. So, Bassianus, you have play'd your prize:
    God give you joy, sir, of your gallant bride!

16 I / 1
  • Traitor, if Rome have law or we have power,
    Thou and thy faction shall repen...
  • Traitor, if Rome have law or we have power,
    Thou and thy faction shall repent this rape.
  • Bassianus. And you of yours, my lord! I say no more,
    Nor wish no less; and so, I take my leave.

    Saturninus. Traitor, if Rome have law or we have power,
    Thou and thy faction shall repent this rape.

17 I / 1
  • 'Tis good, sir: you are very short with us;
    But, if we live, we'll be as sha...
  • 'Tis good, sir: you are very short with us;
    But, if we live, we'll be as sharp with you.
  • Bassianus. Rape, call you it, my lord, to seize my own,
    My truth-betrothed love and now my wife?
    But let the laws of Rome determine all;
    Meanwhile I am possess'd of that is mine.

    Saturninus. 'Tis good, sir: you are very short with us;
    But, if we live, we'll be as sharp with you.

18 I / 1
  • What, madam! be dishonour'd openly,
    And basely put it up without revenge?
  • What, madam! be dishonour'd openly,
    And basely put it up without revenge?
  • Tamora. My worthy lord, if ever Tamora
    Were gracious in those princely eyes of thine,
    Then hear me speak in indifferently for all;
    And at my suit, sweet, pardon what is past.

    Saturninus. What, madam! be dishonour'd openly,
    And basely put it up without revenge?

19 I / 1
  • Rise, Titus, rise; my empress hath prevail'd.
  • Rise, Titus, rise; my empress hath prevail'd.
  • Tamora. Not so, my lord; the gods of Rome forfend
    I should be author to dishonour you!
    But on mine honour dare I undertake
    For good Lord Titus' innocence in all;
    Whose fury not dissembled speaks his griefs:
    Then, at my suit, look graciously on him;
    Lose not so noble a friend on vain suppose,
    Nor with sour looks afflict his gentle heart.
    [Aside to SATURNINUS] My lord, be ruled by me,]
    be won at last;
    Dissemble all your griefs and discontents:
    You are but newly planted in your throne;
    Lest, then, the people, and patricians too,
    Upon a just survey, take Titus' part,
    And so supplant you for ingratitude,
    Which Rome reputes to be a heinous sin,
    Yield at entreats; and then let me alone:
    I'll find a day to massacre them all
    And raze their faction and their family,
    The cruel father and his traitorous sons,
    To whom I sued for my dear son's life,
    And make them know what 'tis to let a queen
    Kneel in the streets and beg for grace in vain.
    [Aloud]
    Come, come, sweet emperor; come, Andronicus;
    Take up this good old man, and cheer the heart
    That dies in tempest of thy angry frown.

    Saturninus. Rise, Titus, rise; my empress hath prevail'd.

20 I / 1
  • Away, and talk not; trouble us no more.
  • Away, and talk not; trouble us no more.
  • Marcus Andronicus. That, on mine honour, here I do protest.

    Saturninus. Away, and talk not; trouble us no more.

21 I / 1
  • Marcus, for thy sake and thy brother's here,
    And at my lovely Tamora's entre...
  • Marcus, for thy sake and thy brother's here,
    And at my lovely Tamora's entreats,
    I do remit these young men's heinous faults: Stand up.
    Lavinia, though you left me like a churl,
    I found a friend, and sure as death I swore
    I would not part a bachelor from the priest.
    Come, if the emperor's court can feast two brides,
    You are my guest, Lavinia, and your friends.
    This day shall be a love-day, Tamora.
  • Tamora. Nay, nay, sweet emperor, we must all be friends:
    The tribune and his nephews kneel for grace;
    I will not be denied: sweet heart, look back.

    Saturninus. Marcus, for thy sake and thy brother's here,
    And at my lovely Tamora's entreats,
    I do remit these young men's heinous faults: Stand up.
    Lavinia, though you left me like a churl,
    I found a friend, and sure as death I swore
    I would not part a bachelor from the priest.
    Come, if the emperor's court can feast two brides,
    You are my guest, Lavinia, and your friends.
    This day shall be a love-day, Tamora.

22 I / 1
  • Be it so, Titus, and gramercy too.
  • Be it so, Titus, and gramercy too.
  • Titus Andronicus. To-morrow, an it please your majesty
    To hunt the panther and the hart with me,
    With horn and hound we'll give your grace bonjour.

    Saturninus. Be it so, Titus, and gramercy too.

23 II / 2
  • And you have rung it lustily, my lord;
    Somewhat too early for new-married la...
  • And you have rung it lustily, my lord;
    Somewhat too early for new-married ladies.
  • Titus Andronicus. The hunt is up, the morn is bright and grey,
    The fields are fragrant and the woods are green:
    Uncouple here and let us make a bay
    And wake the emperor and his lovely bride
    And rouse the prince and ring a hunter's peal,
    That all the court may echo with the noise.
    Sons, let it be your charge, as it is ours,
    To attend the emperor's person carefully:
    I have been troubled in my sleep this night,
    But dawning day new comfort hath inspired.
    [A cry of hounds and horns, winded in a peal. Enter]
    SATURNINUS, TAMORA, BASSIANUS, LAVINIA, DEMETRIUS,
    CHIRON, and Attendants]
    Many good morrows to your majesty;
    Madam, to you as many and as good:
    I promised your grace a hunter's peal.

    Saturninus. And you have rung it lustily, my lord;
    Somewhat too early for new-married ladies.

24 II / 2
  • Come on, then; horse and chariots let us have,
    And to our sport.
    [To TAM...
  • Come on, then; horse and chariots let us have,
    And to our sport.
    [To TAMORA]
    Madam, now shall ye see
    Our Roman hunting.
  • Lavinia. I say, no;
    I have been broad awake two hours and more.

    Saturninus. Come on, then; horse and chariots let us have,
    And to our sport.
    [To TAMORA]
    Madam, now shall ye see
    Our Roman hunting.

25 II / 3
  • Along with me: I'll see what hole is here,
    And what he is that now is leap'd...
  • Along with me: I'll see what hole is here,
    And what he is that now is leap'd into it.
    Say who art thou that lately didst descend
    Into this gaping hollow of the earth?
  • Quintus. Thy hand once more; I will not loose again,
    Till thou art here aloft, or I below:
    Thou canst not come to me: I come to thee.

    Saturninus. Along with me: I'll see what hole is here,
    And what he is that now is leap'd into it.
    Say who art thou that lately didst descend
    Into this gaping hollow of the earth?

26 II / 3
  • My brother dead! I know thou dost but jest:
    He and his lady both are at the...
  • My brother dead! I know thou dost but jest:
    He and his lady both are at the lodge
    Upon the north side of this pleasant chase;
    'Tis not an hour since I left him there.
  • Martius. The unhappy son of old Andronicus:
    Brought hither in a most unlucky hour,
    To find thy brother Bassianus dead.

    Saturninus. My brother dead! I know thou dost but jest:
    He and his lady both are at the lodge
    Upon the north side of this pleasant chase;
    'Tis not an hour since I left him there.

27 II / 3
  • Here, Tamora, though grieved with killing grief.
  • Here, Tamora, though grieved with killing grief.
  • Tamora. Where is my lord the king?

    Saturninus. Here, Tamora, though grieved with killing grief.

28 II / 3
  • Now to the bottom dost thou search my wound:
    Poor Bassianus here lies murder...
  • Now to the bottom dost thou search my wound:
    Poor Bassianus here lies murdered.
  • Tamora. Where is thy brother Bassianus?

    Saturninus. Now to the bottom dost thou search my wound:
    Poor Bassianus here lies murdered.

29 II / 3
  • [Reads] 'An if we miss to meet him handsomely--
    Sweet huntsman, Bassianus 't...
  • [Reads] 'An if we miss to meet him handsomely--
    Sweet huntsman, Bassianus 'tis we mean--
    Do thou so much as dig the grave for him:
    Thou know'st our meaning. Look for thy reward
    Among the nettles at the elder-tree
    Which overshades the mouth of that same pit
    Where we decreed to bury Bassianus.
    Do this, and purchase us thy lasting friends.'
    O Tamora! was ever heard the like?
    This is the pit, and this the elder-tree.
    Look, sirs, if you can find the huntsman out
    That should have murdered Bassianus here.
  • Tamora. Then all too late I bring this fatal writ,
    The complot of this timeless tragedy;
    And wonder greatly that man's face can fold
    In pleasing smiles such murderous tyranny.

    Saturninus. [Reads] 'An if we miss to meet him handsomely--
    Sweet huntsman, Bassianus 'tis we mean--
    Do thou so much as dig the grave for him:
    Thou know'st our meaning. Look for thy reward
    Among the nettles at the elder-tree
    Which overshades the mouth of that same pit
    Where we decreed to bury Bassianus.
    Do this, and purchase us thy lasting friends.'
    O Tamora! was ever heard the like?
    This is the pit, and this the elder-tree.
    Look, sirs, if you can find the huntsman out
    That should have murdered Bassianus here.

30 II / 3
  • [To TITUS] Two of thy whelps, fell curs of
    bloody kind,
    Have here bereft...
  • [To TITUS] Two of thy whelps, fell curs of
    bloody kind,
    Have here bereft my brother of his life.
    Sirs, drag them from the pit unto the prison:
    There let them bide until we have devised
    Some never-heard-of torturing pain for them.
  • Aaron. My gracious lord, here is the bag of gold.

    Saturninus. [To TITUS] Two of thy whelps, fell curs of
    bloody kind,
    Have here bereft my brother of his life.
    Sirs, drag them from the pit unto the prison:
    There let them bide until we have devised
    Some never-heard-of torturing pain for them.

31 II / 3
  • If it be proved! you see it is apparent.
    Who found this letter? Tamora, was...
  • If it be proved! you see it is apparent.
    Who found this letter? Tamora, was it you?
  • Titus Andronicus. High emperor, upon my feeble knee
    I beg this boon, with tears not lightly shed,
    That this fell fault of my accursed sons,
    Accursed if the fault be proved in them,--

    Saturninus. If it be proved! you see it is apparent.
    Who found this letter? Tamora, was it you?

32 II / 3
  • Thou shalt not bail them: see thou follow me.
    Some bring the murder'd body,...
  • Thou shalt not bail them: see thou follow me.
    Some bring the murder'd body, some the murderers:
    Let them not speak a word; the guilt is plain;
    For, by my soul, were there worse end than death,
    That end upon them should be executed.
  • Titus Andronicus. I did, my lord: yet let me be their bail;
    For, by my father's reverend tomb, I vow
    They shall be ready at your highness' will
    To answer their suspicion with their lives.

    Saturninus. Thou shalt not bail them: see thou follow me.
    Some bring the murder'd body, some the murderers:
    Let them not speak a word; the guilt is plain;
    For, by my soul, were there worse end than death,
    That end upon them should be executed.

33 IV / 4
  • Why, lords, what wrongs are these! was ever seen
    An emperor in Rome thus ove...
  • Why, lords, what wrongs are these! was ever seen
    An emperor in Rome thus overborne,
    Troubled, confronted thus; and, for the extent
    Of egal justice, used in such contempt?
    My lords, you know, as know the mightful gods,
    However these disturbers of our peace
    Buz in the people's ears, there nought hath pass'd,
    But even with law, against the willful sons
    Of old Andronicus. And what an if
    His sorrows have so overwhelm'd his wits,
    Shall we be thus afflicted in his wreaks,
    His fits, his frenzy, and his bitterness?
    And now he writes to heaven for his redress:
    See, here's to Jove, and this to Mercury;
    This to Apollo; this to the god of war;
    Sweet scrolls to fly about the streets of Rome!
    What's this but libelling against the senate,
    And blazoning our injustice every where?
    A goodly humour, is it not, my lords?
    As who would say, in Rome no justice were.
    But if I live, his feigned ecstasies
    Shall be no shelter to these outrages:
    But he and his shall know that justice lives
    In Saturninus' health, whom, if she sleep,
    He'll so awake as she in fury shall
    Cut off the proud'st conspirator that lives.
  • Titus Andronicus. Come, Marcus, let us go. Publius, follow me.

    Saturninus. Why, lords, what wrongs are these! was ever seen
    An emperor in Rome thus overborne,
    Troubled, confronted thus; and, for the extent
    Of egal justice, used in such contempt?
    My lords, you know, as know the mightful gods,
    However these disturbers of our peace
    Buz in the people's ears, there nought hath pass'd,
    But even with law, against the willful sons
    Of old Andronicus. And what an if
    His sorrows have so overwhelm'd his wits,
    Shall we be thus afflicted in his wreaks,
    His fits, his frenzy, and his bitterness?
    And now he writes to heaven for his redress:
    See, here's to Jove, and this to Mercury;
    This to Apollo; this to the god of war;
    Sweet scrolls to fly about the streets of Rome!
    What's this but libelling against the senate,
    And blazoning our injustice every where?
    A goodly humour, is it not, my lords?
    As who would say, in Rome no justice were.
    But if I live, his feigned ecstasies
    Shall be no shelter to these outrages:
    But he and his shall know that justice lives
    In Saturninus' health, whom, if she sleep,
    He'll so awake as she in fury shall
    Cut off the proud'st conspirator that lives.

34 IV / 4
  • Go, take him away, and hang him presently.
  • Go, take him away, and hang him presently.
  • Clown. 'Tis he. God and Saint Stephen give you good den:
    I have brought you a letter and a couple of pigeons here.

    Saturninus. Go, take him away, and hang him presently.

35 IV / 4
  • Despiteful and intolerable wrongs!
    Shall I endure this monstrous villany?
  • Despiteful and intolerable wrongs!
    Shall I endure this monstrous villany?
    I know from whence this same device proceeds:
    May this be borne?--as if his traitorous sons,
    That died by law for murder of our brother,
    Have by my means been butcher'd wrongfully!
    Go, drag the villain hither by the hair;
    Nor age nor honour shall shape privilege:
    For this proud mock I'll be thy slaughterman;
    Sly frantic wretch, that holp'st to make me great,
    In hope thyself should govern Rome and me.
    [Enter AEMILIUS]
    What news with thee, AEmilius?
  • Clown. Hanged! by'r lady, then I have brought up a neck to
    a fair end.

    Saturninus. Despiteful and intolerable wrongs!
    Shall I endure this monstrous villany?
    I know from whence this same device proceeds:
    May this be borne?--as if his traitorous sons,
    That died by law for murder of our brother,
    Have by my means been butcher'd wrongfully!
    Go, drag the villain hither by the hair;
    Nor age nor honour shall shape privilege:
    For this proud mock I'll be thy slaughterman;
    Sly frantic wretch, that holp'st to make me great,
    In hope thyself should govern Rome and me.
    [Enter AEMILIUS]
    What news with thee, AEmilius?

36 IV / 4
  • Is warlike Lucius general of the Goths?
    These tidings nip me, and I hang the...
  • Is warlike Lucius general of the Goths?
    These tidings nip me, and I hang the head
    As flowers with frost or grass beat down with storms:
    Ay, now begin our sorrows to approach:
    'Tis he the common people love so much;
    Myself hath often over-heard them say,
    When I have walked like a private man,
    That Lucius' banishment was wrongfully,
    And they have wish'd that Lucius were their emperor.
  • Aemilius. Arm, arm, my lord;--Rome never had more cause.
    The Goths have gather'd head; and with a power
    high-resolved men, bent to the spoil,
    They hither march amain, under conduct
    Of Lucius, son to old Andronicus;
    Who threats, in course of this revenge, to do
    As much as ever Coriolanus did.

    Saturninus. Is warlike Lucius general of the Goths?
    These tidings nip me, and I hang the head
    As flowers with frost or grass beat down with storms:
    Ay, now begin our sorrows to approach:
    'Tis he the common people love so much;
    Myself hath often over-heard them say,
    When I have walked like a private man,
    That Lucius' banishment was wrongfully,
    And they have wish'd that Lucius were their emperor.

37 IV / 4
  • Ay, but the citizens favor Lucius,
    And will revolt from me to succor him.
  • Ay, but the citizens favor Lucius,
    And will revolt from me to succor him.
  • Tamora. Why should you fear? is not your city strong?

    Saturninus. Ay, but the citizens favor Lucius,
    And will revolt from me to succor him.

38 IV / 4
  • But he will not entreat his son for us.
  • But he will not entreat his son for us.
  • Tamora. King, be thy thoughts imperious, like thy name.
    Is the sun dimm'd, that gnats do fly in it?
    The eagle suffers little birds to sing,
    And is not careful what they mean thereby,
    Knowing that with the shadow of his wings
    He can at pleasure stint their melody:
    Even so mayst thou the giddy men of Rome.
    Then cheer thy spirit : for know, thou emperor,
    I will enchant the old Andronicus
    With words more sweet, and yet more dangerous,
    Than baits to fish, or honey-stalks to sheep,
    When as the one is wounded with the bait,
    The other rotted with delicious feed.

    Saturninus. But he will not entreat his son for us.

39 IV / 4
  • AEmilius, do this message honourably:
    And if he stand on hostage for his saf...
  • AEmilius, do this message honourably:
    And if he stand on hostage for his safety,
    Bid him demand what pledge will please him best.
  • Tamora. If Tamora entreat him, then he will:
    For I can smooth and fill his aged ear
    With golden promises; that, were his heart
    Almost impregnable, his old ears deaf,
    Yet should both ear and heart obey my tongue.
    [To AEmilius]
    Go thou before, be our ambassador:
    Say that the emperor requests a parley
    Of warlike Lucius, and appoint the meeting
    Even at his father's house, the old Andronicus.

    Saturninus. AEmilius, do this message honourably:
    And if he stand on hostage for his safety,
    Bid him demand what pledge will please him best.

40 IV / 4
  • Then go successantly, and plead to him.
  • Then go successantly, and plead to him.
  • Tamora. Now will I to that old Andronicus;
    And temper him with all the art I have,
    To pluck proud Lucius from the warlike Goths.
    And now, sweet emperor, be blithe again,
    And bury all thy fear in my devices.

    Saturninus. Then go successantly, and plead to him.

41 V / 3
  • What, hath the firmament more suns than one?
  • What, hath the firmament more suns than one?
  • Lucius. Away, inhuman dog! unhallow'd slave!
    Sirs, help our uncle to convey him in.
    [Exeunt Goths, with AARON. Flourish within]
    The trumpets show the emperor is at hand.
    [Enter SATURNINUS and TAMORA, with AEMILIUS,]
    Tribunes, Senators, and others]

    Saturninus. What, hath the firmament more suns than one?

42 V / 3
  • Marcus, we will.
    [Hautboys sound. The Company sit down at table]
    [Enter...
  • Marcus, we will.
    [Hautboys sound. The Company sit down at table]
    [Enter TITUS dressed like a Cook, LAVINIA veiled,]
    Young LUCIUS, and others. TITUS places the dishes
    on the table]
  • Marcus Andronicus. Rome's emperor, and nephew, break the parle;
    These quarrels must be quietly debated.
    The feast is ready, which the careful Titus
    Hath ordain'd to an honourable end,
    For peace, for love, for league, and good to Rome:
    Please you, therefore, draw nigh, and take your places.

    Saturninus. Marcus, we will.
    [Hautboys sound. The Company sit down at table]
    [Enter TITUS dressed like a Cook, LAVINIA veiled,]
    Young LUCIUS, and others. TITUS places the dishes
    on the table]

43 V / 3
  • Why art thou thus attired, Andronicus?
  • Why art thou thus attired, Andronicus?
  • Titus Andronicus. Welcome, my gracious lord; welcome, dread queen;
    Welcome, ye warlike Goths; welcome, Lucius;
    And welcome, all: although the cheer be poor,
    'Twill fill your stomachs; please you eat of it.

    Saturninus. Why art thou thus attired, Andronicus?

44 V / 3
  • It was, Andronicus.
  • It was, Andronicus.
  • Titus Andronicus. An if your highness knew my heart, you were.
    My lord the emperor, resolve me this:
    Was it well done of rash Virginius
    To slay his daughter with his own right hand,
    Because she was enforced, stain'd, and deflower'd?

    Saturninus. It was, Andronicus.

45 V / 3
  • Because the girl should not survive her shame,
    And by her presence still ren...
  • Because the girl should not survive her shame,
    And by her presence still renew his sorrows.
  • Titus Andronicus. Your reason, mighty lord?

    Saturninus. Because the girl should not survive her shame,
    And by her presence still renew his sorrows.

46 V / 3
  • What hast thou done, unnatural and unkind?
  • What hast thou done, unnatural and unkind?
  • Titus Andronicus. A reason mighty, strong, and effectual;
    A pattern, precedent, and lively warrant,
    For me, most wretched, to perform the like.
    Die, die, Lavinia, and thy shame with thee;
    [Kills LAVINIA]
    And, with thy shame, thy father's sorrow die!

    Saturninus. What hast thou done, unnatural and unkind?

47 V / 3
  • What, was she ravish'd? tell who did the deed.
  • What, was she ravish'd? tell who did the deed.
  • Titus Andronicus. Kill'd her, for whom my tears have made me blind.
    I am as woful as Virginius was,
    And have a thousand times more cause than he
    To do this outrage: and it now is done.

    Saturninus. What, was she ravish'd? tell who did the deed.

48 V / 3
  • Go fetch them hither to us presently.
  • Go fetch them hither to us presently.
  • Titus Andronicus. Not I; 'twas Chiron and Demetrius:
    They ravish'd her, and cut away her tongue;
    And they, 'twas they, that did her all this wrong.

    Saturninus. Go fetch them hither to us presently.

49 V / 3
  • Die, frantic wretch, for this accursed deed!
  • Die, frantic wretch, for this accursed deed!
  • Titus Andronicus. Why, there they are both, baked in that pie;
    Whereof their mother daintily hath fed,
    Eating the flesh that she herself hath bred.
    'Tis true, 'tis true; witness my knife's sharp point.

    Saturninus. Die, frantic wretch, for this accursed deed!

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.