Speeches (Lines) for Second Lord in "The Tragedy of Timon of Athens"

Total: 29
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Thou art going to Lord Timon's feast?
  • Thou art going to Lord Timon's feast?
  • Apemantus. The more accursed thou, that still omitt'st it.

    Second Lord. Thou art going to Lord Timon's feast?

2 I / 1
  • Fare thee well, fare thee well.
  • Fare thee well, fare thee well.
  • Apemantus. Ay, to see meat fill knaves and wine heat fools.

    Second Lord. Fare thee well, fare thee well.

3 I / 1
  • Why, Apemantus?
  • Why, Apemantus?
  • Apemantus. Thou art a fool to bid me farewell twice.

    Second Lord. Why, Apemantus?

4 I / 1
  • Away, unpeaceable dog, or I'll spurn thee hence!
  • Away, unpeaceable dog, or I'll spurn thee hence!
  • Apemantus. No, I will do nothing at thy bidding: make thy
    requests to thy friend.

    Second Lord. Away, unpeaceable dog, or I'll spurn thee hence!

5 I / 1
  • He pours it out; Plutus, the god of gold,
    Is but his steward: no meed, but h...
  • He pours it out; Plutus, the god of gold,
    Is but his steward: no meed, but he repays
    Sevenfold above itself; no gift to him,
    But breeds the giver a return exceeding
    All use of quittance.
  • First Lord. He's opposite to humanity. Come, shall we in,
    And taste Lord Timon's bounty? he outgoes
    The very heart of kindness.

    Second Lord. He pours it out; Plutus, the god of gold,
    Is but his steward: no meed, but he repays
    Sevenfold above itself; no gift to him,
    But breeds the giver a return exceeding
    All use of quittance.

6 I / 1
  • Long may he live in fortunes! Shall we in?
  • Long may he live in fortunes! Shall we in?
  • First Lord. The noblest mind he carries
    That ever govern'd man.

    Second Lord. Long may he live in fortunes! Shall we in?

7 I / 2
  • Let it flow this way, my good lord.
  • Let it flow this way, my good lord.
  • Timon. My lord, in heart; and let the health go round.

    Second Lord. Let it flow this way, my good lord.

8 I / 2
  • Joy had the like conception in our eyes
    And at that instant like a babe spru...
  • Joy had the like conception in our eyes
    And at that instant like a babe sprung up.
  • Apemantus. Thou weepest to make them drink, Timon.

    Second Lord. Joy had the like conception in our eyes
    And at that instant like a babe sprung up.

9 I / 2
  • Our horses!
  • Our horses!
  • Servant. Here, my lord, in readiness.

    Second Lord. Our horses!

10 I / 2
  • With more than common thanks I will receive it.
  • With more than common thanks I will receive it.
  • Timon. You do yourselves
    Much wrong, you bate too much of your own merits:
    Here, my lord, a trifle of our love.

    Second Lord. With more than common thanks I will receive it.

11 I / 2
  • O, I beseech you, pardon me, my lord, in that.
  • O, I beseech you, pardon me, my lord, in that.
  • Timon. And now I remember, my lord, you gave
    Good words the other day of a bay courser
    I rode on: it is yours, because you liked it.

    Second Lord. O, I beseech you, pardon me, my lord, in that.

12 I / 2
  • So infinitely endear'd--
  • So infinitely endear'd--
  • Timon. And so
    Am I to you.

    Second Lord. So infinitely endear'd--

13 III / 6
  • I also wish it to you. I think this honourable lord
    did but try us this othe...
  • I also wish it to you. I think this honourable lord
    did but try us this other day.
  • First Lord. The good time of day to you, sir.

    Second Lord. I also wish it to you. I think this honourable lord
    did but try us this other day.

14 III / 6
  • It should not be, by the persuasion of his new feasting.
  • It should not be, by the persuasion of his new feasting.
  • First Lord. Upon that were my thoughts tiring, when we
    encountered: I hope it is not so low with him as
    he made it seem in the trial of his several friends.

    Second Lord. It should not be, by the persuasion of his new feasting.

15 III / 6
  • In like manner was I in debt to my importunate
    business, but he would not he...
  • In like manner was I in debt to my importunate
    business, but he would not hear my excuse. I am
    sorry, when he sent to borrow of me, that my
    provision was out.
  • First Lord. I should think so: he hath sent me an earnest
    inviting, which many my near occasions did urge me
    to put off; but he hath conjured me beyond them, and
    I must needs appear.

    Second Lord. In like manner was I in debt to my importunate
    business, but he would not hear my excuse. I am
    sorry, when he sent to borrow of me, that my
    provision was out.

16 III / 6
  • Every man here's so. What would he have borrowed of
    you?
  • Every man here's so. What would he have borrowed of
    you?
  • First Lord. I am sick of that grief too, as I understand how all
    things go.

    Second Lord. Every man here's so. What would he have borrowed of
    you?

17 III / 6
  • A thousand pieces!
  • A thousand pieces!
  • First Lord. A thousand pieces.

    Second Lord. A thousand pieces!

18 III / 6
  • He sent to me, sir,--Here he comes.
  • He sent to me, sir,--Here he comes.
  • First Lord. What of you?

    Second Lord. He sent to me, sir,--Here he comes.

19 III / 6
  • The swallow follows not summer more willing than we
    your lordship.
  • The swallow follows not summer more willing than we
    your lordship.
  • First Lord. Ever at the best, hearing well of your lordship.

    Second Lord. The swallow follows not summer more willing than we
    your lordship.

20 III / 6
  • My noble lord,--
  • My noble lord,--
  • Timon. O, sir, let it not trouble you.

    Second Lord. My noble lord,--

21 III / 6
  • My most honourable lord, I am e'en sick of shame,
    that, when your lordship t...
  • My most honourable lord, I am e'en sick of shame,
    that, when your lordship this other day sent to me,
    I was so unfortunate a beggar.
  • Timon. Ah, my good friend, what cheer?

    Second Lord. My most honourable lord, I am e'en sick of shame,
    that, when your lordship this other day sent to me,
    I was so unfortunate a beggar.

22 III / 6
  • If you had sent but two hours before,--
  • If you had sent but two hours before,--
  • Timon. Think not on 't, sir.

    Second Lord. If you had sent but two hours before,--

23 III / 6
  • All covered dishes!
  • All covered dishes!
  • Timon. Let it not cumber your better remembrance.
    [The banquet brought in]
    Come, bring in all together.

    Second Lord. All covered dishes!

24 III / 6
  • I pray you, upon what?
  • I pray you, upon what?
  • First Lord. How! how!

    Second Lord. I pray you, upon what?

25 III / 6
  • This is the old man still.
  • This is the old man still.
  • Third Lord. I'll tell you more anon. Here's a noble feast toward.

    Second Lord. This is the old man still.

26 III / 6
  • It does: but time will--and so--
  • It does: but time will--and so--
  • Third Lord. Will 't hold? will 't hold?

    Second Lord. It does: but time will--and so--

27 III / 6
  • Know you the quality of Lord Timon's fury?
  • Know you the quality of Lord Timon's fury?
  • First Lord. How now, my lords!

    Second Lord. Know you the quality of Lord Timon's fury?

28 III / 6
  • Here 'tis.
  • Here 'tis.
  • Third Lord. Did you see my cap?

    Second Lord. Here 'tis.

29 III / 6
  • Lord Timon's mad.
  • Lord Timon's mad.
  • First Lord. Let's make no stay.

    Second Lord. Lord Timon's mad.

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