Speeches (Lines) for Servant in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 15
print
# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 III, 1, 1495
  • Ay, sir, when he goes before me.
  • Ay, sir, when he goes before me.
  • Pandarus. Friend, you! pray you, a word: do not you follow
    the young Lord Paris?

    Servant. Ay, sir, when he goes before me.

2 III, 1, 1497
  • Sir, I do depend upon the lord.
  • Sir, I do depend upon the lord.
  • Pandarus. You depend upon him, I mean?

    Servant. Sir, I do depend upon the lord.

3 III, 1, 1500
  • The lord be praised!
  • The lord be praised!
  • Pandarus. You depend upon a noble gentleman; I must needs
    praise him.

    Servant. The lord be praised!

4 III, 1, 1502
  • Faith, sir, superficially.
  • Faith, sir, superficially.
  • Pandarus. You know me, do you not?

    Servant. Faith, sir, superficially.

5 III, 1, 1504
  • I hope I shall know your honour better.
  • I hope I shall know your honour better.
  • Pandarus. Friend, know me better; I am the Lord Pandarus.

    Servant. I hope I shall know your honour better.

6 III, 1, 1506
  • You are in the state of grace.
  • You are in the state of grace.
  • Pandarus. I do desire it.

    Servant. You are in the state of grace.

7 III, 1, 1510
  • I do but partly know, sir: it is music in parts.
  • I do but partly know, sir: it is music in parts.
  • Pandarus. Grace! not so, friend: honour and lordship are my titles.
    [Music within]
    What music is this?

    Servant. I do but partly know, sir: it is music in parts.

8 III, 1, 1512
  • Wholly, sir.
  • Wholly, sir.
  • Pandarus. Know you the musicians?

    Servant. Wholly, sir.

9 III, 1, 1514
  • To the hearers, sir.
  • To the hearers, sir.
  • Pandarus. Who play they to?

    Servant. To the hearers, sir.

10 III, 1, 1516
  • At mine, sir, and theirs that love music.
  • At mine, sir, and theirs that love music.
  • Pandarus. At whose pleasure, friend

    Servant. At mine, sir, and theirs that love music.

11 III, 1, 1518
  • Who shall I command, sir?
  • Who shall I command, sir?
  • Pandarus. Command, I mean, friend.

    Servant. Who shall I command, sir?

12 III, 1, 1522
  • That's to 't indeed, sir: marry, sir, at the request
    of Paris my lord, who's...
  • That's to 't indeed, sir: marry, sir, at the request
    of Paris my lord, who's there in person; with him,
    the mortal Venus, the heart-blood of beauty, love's
    invisible soul,--
  • Pandarus. Friend, we understand not one another: I am too
    courtly and thou art too cunning. At whose request
    do these men play?

    Servant. That's to 't indeed, sir: marry, sir, at the request
    of Paris my lord, who's there in person; with him,
    the mortal Venus, the heart-blood of beauty, love's
    invisible soul,--

13 III, 1, 1527
  • No, sir, Helen: could you not find out that by her
    attributes?
  • No, sir, Helen: could you not find out that by her
    attributes?
  • Pandarus. Who, my cousin Cressida?

    Servant. No, sir, Helen: could you not find out that by her
    attributes?

14 III, 1, 1533
  • Sodden business! there's a stewed phrase indeed!
  • Sodden business! there's a stewed phrase indeed!
  • Pandarus. It should seem, fellow, that thou hast not seen the
    Lady Cressida. I come to speak with Paris from the
    Prince Troilus: I will make a complimental assault
    upon him, for my business seethes.

    Servant. Sodden business! there's a stewed phrase indeed!

15 V, 5, 3458
  • I go, my lord.
  • I go, my lord.
  • Diomedes. Go, go, my servant, take thou Troilus' horse;
    Present the fair steed to my lady Cressid:
    Fellow, commend my service to her beauty;
    Tell her I have chastised the amorous Trojan,
    And am her knight by proof.

    Servant. I go, my lord.

© Copyright 2018 - 2019: Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.