Speeches (Lines) for Servant in "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 10
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 2, 311
  • Find them out whose names are written here! It is
    written, that the shoemake...
  • Find them out whose names are written here! It is
    written, that the shoemaker should meddle with his
    yard, and the tailor with his last, the fisher with
    his pencil, and the painter with his nets; but I am
    sent to find those persons whose names are here
    writ, and can never find what names the writing
    person hath here writ. I must to the learned.--In good time.
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt CAPULET and PARIS]

    Servant. Find them out whose names are written here! It is
    written, that the shoemaker should meddle with his
    yard, and the tailor with his last, the fisher with
    his pencil, and the painter with his nets; but I am
    sent to find those persons whose names are here
    writ, and can never find what names the writing
    person hath here writ. I must to the learned.--In good time.

2 I, 2, 332
  • God gi' god-den. I pray, sir, can you read?
  • God gi' god-den. I pray, sir, can you read?
  • Romeo. Not mad, but bound more than a mad-man is;
    Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
    Whipp'd and tormented and--God-den, good fellow.

    Servant. God gi' god-den. I pray, sir, can you read?

3 I, 2, 334
  • Perhaps you have learned it without book: but, I
    pray, can you read any thin...
  • Perhaps you have learned it without book: but, I
    pray, can you read any thing you see?
  • Romeo. Ay, mine own fortune in my misery.

    Servant. Perhaps you have learned it without book: but, I
    pray, can you read any thing you see?

4 I, 2, 337
  • Ye say honestly: rest you merry!
  • Ye say honestly: rest you merry!
  • Romeo. Ay, if I know the letters and the language.

    Servant. Ye say honestly: rest you merry!

5 I, 2, 348
  • Up.
  • Up.
  • Romeo. Stay, fellow; I can read.
    [Reads]
    'Signior Martino and his wife and daughters;
    County Anselme and his beauteous sisters; the lady
    widow of Vitravio; Signior Placentio and his lovely
    nieces; Mercutio and his brother Valentine; mine
    uncle Capulet, his wife and daughters; my fair niece
    Rosaline; Livia; Signior Valentio and his cousin
    Tybalt, Lucio and the lively Helena.' A fair
    assembly: whither should they come?

    Servant. Up.

6 I, 2, 350
  • To supper; to our house.
  • To supper; to our house.
  • Romeo. Whither?

    Servant. To supper; to our house.

7 I, 2, 352
  • My master's.
  • My master's.
  • Romeo. Whose house?

    Servant. My master's.

8 I, 2, 354
  • Now I'll tell you without asking: my master is the
    great rich Capulet; and i...
  • Now I'll tell you without asking: my master is the
    great rich Capulet; and if you be not of the house
    of Montagues, I pray, come and crush a cup of wine.
    Rest you merry!
  • Romeo. Indeed, I should have ask'd you that before.

    Servant. Now I'll tell you without asking: my master is the
    great rich Capulet; and if you be not of the house
    of Montagues, I pray, come and crush a cup of wine.
    Rest you merry!

9 I, 3, 486
  • Madam, the guests are come, supper served up, you
    called, my young lady aske...
  • Madam, the guests are come, supper served up, you
    called, my young lady asked for, the nurse cursed in
    the pantry, and every thing in extremity. I must
    hence to wait; I beseech you, follow straight.
  • (stage directions). [Enter a Servant]

    Servant. Madam, the guests are come, supper served up, you
    called, my young lady asked for, the nurse cursed in
    the pantry, and every thing in extremity. I must
    hence to wait; I beseech you, follow straight.

10 I, 5, 665
  • I know not, sir.
  • I know not, sir.
  • Romeo. [To a Servingman] What lady is that, which doth
    enrich the hand
    Of yonder knight?

    Servant. I know not, sir.

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