Speeches (Lines) for Servilius in "The Tragedy of Timon of Athens"

Total: 8
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 III / 2
  • See, by good hap, yonder's my lord;
    I have sweat to see his honour. My honou...
  • See, by good hap, yonder's my lord;
    I have sweat to see his honour. My honoured lord,--
  • Lucilius. What a strange case was that! now, before the gods,
    I am ashamed on't. Denied that honourable man!
    there was very little honour showed in't. For my own
    part, I must needs confess, I have received some
    small kindnesses from him, as money, plate, jewels
    and such-like trifles, nothing comparing to his;
    yet, had he mistook him and sent to me, I should
    ne'er have denied his occasion so many talents.

    Servilius. See, by good hap, yonder's my lord;
    I have sweat to see his honour. My honoured lord,--

2 III / 2
  • May it please your honour, my lord hath sent--
  • May it please your honour, my lord hath sent--
  • Lucilius. Servilius! you are kindly met, sir. Fare thee well:
    commend me to thy honourable virtuous lord, my very
    exquisite friend.

    Servilius. May it please your honour, my lord hath sent--

3 III / 2
  • Has only sent his present occasion now, my lord;
    requesting your lordship to...
  • Has only sent his present occasion now, my lord;
    requesting your lordship to supply his instant use
    with so many talents.
  • Lucilius. Ha! what has he sent? I am so much endeared to
    that lord; he's ever sending: how shall I thank
    him, thinkest thou? And what has he sent now?

    Servilius. Has only sent his present occasion now, my lord;
    requesting your lordship to supply his instant use
    with so many talents.

4 III / 2
  • But in the mean time he wants less, my lord.
    If his occasion were not virtuo...
  • But in the mean time he wants less, my lord.
    If his occasion were not virtuous,
    I should not urge it half so faithfully.
  • Lucilius. I know his lordship is but merry with me;
    He cannot want fifty five hundred talents.

    Servilius. But in the mean time he wants less, my lord.
    If his occasion were not virtuous,
    I should not urge it half so faithfully.

5 III / 2
  • Upon my soul,'tis true, sir.
  • Upon my soul,'tis true, sir.
  • Lucilius. Dost thou speak seriously, Servilius?

    Servilius. Upon my soul,'tis true, sir.

6 III / 2
  • Yes, sir, I shall.
  • Yes, sir, I shall.
  • Lucilius. What a wicked beast was I to disfurnish myself
    against such a good time, when I might ha' shown
    myself honourable! how unluckily it happened, that I
    should purchase the day before for a little part,
    and undo a great deal of honoured! Servilius, now,
    before the gods, I am not able to do,--the more
    beast, I say:--I was sending to use Lord Timon
    myself, these gentlemen can witness! but I would
    not, for the wealth of Athens, I had done't now.
    Commend me bountifully to his good lordship; and I
    hope his honour will conceive the fairest of me,
    because I have no power to be kind: and tell him
    this from me, I count it one of my greatest
    afflictions, say, that I cannot pleasure such an
    honourable gentleman. Good Servilius, will you
    befriend me so far, as to use mine own words to him?

    Servilius. Yes, sir, I shall.

7 III / 4
  • If I might beseech you, gentlemen, to repair some
    other hour, I should deriv...
  • If I might beseech you, gentlemen, to repair some
    other hour, I should derive much from't; for,
    take't of my soul, my lord leans wondrously to
    discontent: his comfortable temper has forsook him;
    he's much out of health, and keeps his chamber.
    And, if it be so far beyond his health,
    Methinks he should the sooner pay his debts,
    And make a clear way to the gods.
  • Titus. O, here's Servilius; now we shall know some answer.

    Servilius. If I might beseech you, gentlemen, to repair some
    other hour, I should derive much from't; for,
    take't of my soul, my lord leans wondrously to
    discontent: his comfortable temper has forsook him;
    he's much out of health, and keeps his chamber.
    And, if it be so far beyond his health,
    Methinks he should the sooner pay his debts,
    And make a clear way to the gods.

8 III / 4
  • Good gods!
  • Good gods!
  • Servilius. If I might beseech you, gentlemen, to repair some
    other hour, I should derive much from't; for,
    take't of my soul, my lord leans wondrously to
    discontent: his comfortable temper has forsook him;
    he's much out of health, and keeps his chamber.
    And, if it be so far beyond his health,
    Methinks he should the sooner pay his debts,
    And make a clear way to the gods.

    Servilius. Good gods!

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.