Speeches (Lines) for Seyton in "The Tragedy of Macbeth"

Total: 5
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 V / 3
  • What is your gracious pleasure?
  • What is your gracious pleasure?
  • Macbeth. Take thy face hence.
    [Exit Servant]
    Seyton!--I am sick at heart,
    When I behold--Seyton, I say!--This push
    Will cheer me ever, or disseat me now.
    I have lived long enough: my way of life
    Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf;
    And that which should accompany old age,
    As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends,
    I must not look to have; but, in their stead,
    Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath,
    Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not. Seyton!

    Seyton. What is your gracious pleasure?

2 V / 3
  • All is confirm'd, my lord, which was reported.
  • All is confirm'd, my lord, which was reported.
  • Macbeth. What news more?

    Seyton. All is confirm'd, my lord, which was reported.

3 V / 3
  • 'Tis not needed yet.
  • 'Tis not needed yet.
  • Macbeth. I'll fight till from my bones my flesh be hack'd.
    Give me my armour.

    Seyton. 'Tis not needed yet.

4 V / 5
  • It is the cry of women, my good lord.
  • It is the cry of women, my good lord.
  • Macbeth. Hang out our banners on the outward walls;
    The cry is still 'They come:' our castle's strength
    Will laugh a siege to scorn: here let them lie
    Till famine and the ague eat them up:
    Were they not forced with those that should be ours,
    We might have met them dareful, beard to beard,
    And beat them backward home.
    [A cry of women within]
    What is that noise?

    Seyton. It is the cry of women, my good lord.

5 V / 5
  • The queen, my lord, is dead.
  • The queen, my lord, is dead.
  • Macbeth. I have almost forgot the taste of fears;
    The time has been, my senses would have cool'd
    To hear a night-shriek; and my fell of hair
    Would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir
    As life were in't: I have supp'd full with horrors;
    Direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts
    Cannot once start me.
    [Re-enter SEYTON]
    Wherefore was that cry?

    Seyton. The queen, my lord, is dead.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.