Speeches (Lines) for Robert Shallow in "History of Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 77
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 III / 2
  • Come on, come on, come on; give me your hand, sir;
    your hand, sir. An early...
  • Come on, come on, come on; give me your hand, sir;
    your hand, sir. An early stirrer, by the rood! And how doth
    good cousin Silence?
  • Henry IV. I will take your counsel.
    And, were these inward wars once out of hand,
    We would, dear lords, unto the Holy Land. Exeunt

    Robert Shallow. Come on, come on, come on; give me your hand, sir;
    your hand, sir. An early stirrer, by the rood! And how doth
    good cousin Silence?

2 III / 2
  • And how doth my cousin, your bed-fellow? and your
    daughter and mine, my god-...
  • And how doth my cousin, your bed-fellow? and your
    daughter and mine, my god-daughter Ellen?
  • Silence. Good morrow, good cousin Shallow.

    Robert Shallow. And how doth my cousin, your bed-fellow? and your
    daughter and mine, my god-daughter Ellen?

3 III / 2
  • By yea and no, sir. I dare say my cousin William is
    a good scholar; he is at...
  • By yea and no, sir. I dare say my cousin William is
    a good scholar; he is at Oxford still, is he not?
  • Silence. Alas, a black ousel, cousin Shallow!

    Robert Shallow. By yea and no, sir. I dare say my cousin William is
    a good scholar; he is at Oxford still, is he not?

4 III / 2
  • 'A must, then, to the Inns o' Court shortly. I was
    Clement's Inn; where I th...
  • 'A must, then, to the Inns o' Court shortly. I was
    Clement's Inn; where I think they will talk of mad Shallow
  • Silence. Indeed, sir, to my cost.

    Robert Shallow. 'A must, then, to the Inns o' Court shortly. I was
    Clement's Inn; where I think they will talk of mad Shallow

5 III / 2
  • By the mass, I was call'd anything; and I would have
    anything indeed too, an...
  • By the mass, I was call'd anything; and I would have
    anything indeed too, and roundly too. There was I, and little
    John Doit of Staffordshire, and black George Barnes, and
    Pickbone, and Will Squele a Cotsole man--you had not four
    swinge-bucklers in all the Inns of Court again. And I may say
    you we knew where the bona-robas were, and had the best of
    all at commandment. Then was Jack Falstaff, now Sir John,
    and page to Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.
  • Silence. You were call'd 'lusty Shallow' then, cousin.

    Robert Shallow. By the mass, I was call'd anything; and I would have
    anything indeed too, and roundly too. There was I, and little
    John Doit of Staffordshire, and black George Barnes, and
    Pickbone, and Will Squele a Cotsole man--you had not four
    swinge-bucklers in all the Inns of Court again. And I may say
    you we knew where the bona-robas were, and had the best of
    all at commandment. Then was Jack Falstaff, now Sir John,
    and page to Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.

6 III / 2
  • The same Sir John, the very same. I see him break
    Scoggin's head at the cour...
  • The same Sir John, the very same. I see him break
    Scoggin's head at the court gate, when 'a was a crack not
    high; and the very same day did I fight with one Sampson
    Stockfish, a fruiterer, behind Gray's Inn. Jesu, Jesu, the
    days that I have spent! and to see how many of my old
    acquaintance are dead!
  • Silence. This Sir John, cousin, that comes hither anon about
    soldiers?

    Robert Shallow. The same Sir John, the very same. I see him break
    Scoggin's head at the court gate, when 'a was a crack not
    high; and the very same day did I fight with one Sampson
    Stockfish, a fruiterer, behind Gray's Inn. Jesu, Jesu, the
    days that I have spent! and to see how many of my old
    acquaintance are dead!

7 III / 2
  • Certain, 'tis certain; very sure, very sure. Death, as
    Psalmist saith, is ce...
  • Certain, 'tis certain; very sure, very sure. Death, as
    Psalmist saith, is certain to all; all shall die. How a good
    of bullocks at Stamford fair?
  • Silence. We shall all follow, cousin.

    Robert Shallow. Certain, 'tis certain; very sure, very sure. Death, as
    Psalmist saith, is certain to all; all shall die. How a good
    of bullocks at Stamford fair?

8 III / 2
  • Death is certain. Is old Double of your town living
  • Death is certain. Is old Double of your town living
  • Silence. By my troth, I was not there.

    Robert Shallow. Death is certain. Is old Double of your town living

9 III / 2
  • Jesu, Jesu, dead! drew a good bow; and dead! 'A shot a
    fine shoot. John a Ga...
  • Jesu, Jesu, dead! drew a good bow; and dead! 'A shot a
    fine shoot. John a Gaunt loved him well, and betted much
    his head. Dead! 'A would have clapp'd i' th' clout at twelve
    score, and carried you a forehand shaft a fourteen and
    and a half, that it would have done a man's heart good to
    How a score of ewes now?
  • Silence. Dead, sir.

    Robert Shallow. Jesu, Jesu, dead! drew a good bow; and dead! 'A shot a
    fine shoot. John a Gaunt loved him well, and betted much
    his head. Dead! 'A would have clapp'd i' th' clout at twelve
    score, and carried you a forehand shaft a fourteen and
    and a half, that it would have done a man's heart good to
    How a score of ewes now?

10 III / 2
  • And is old Double dead?
  • And is old Double dead?
  • Silence. Thereafter as they be--a score of good ewes may be
    ten pounds.

    Robert Shallow. And is old Double dead?

11 III / 2
  • Good morrow, honest gentlemen.
  • Good morrow, honest gentlemen.
  • Silence. Here come two of Sir John Falstaffs men, as I think.

    Robert Shallow. Good morrow, honest gentlemen.

12 III / 2
  • I am Robert Shallow, sir, a poor esquire of this
    and one of the King's justi...
  • I am Robert Shallow, sir, a poor esquire of this
    and one of the King's justices of the peace. What is your
    pleasure with me?
  • Bardolph. I beseech you, which is Justice Shallow?

    Robert Shallow. I am Robert Shallow, sir, a poor esquire of this
    and one of the King's justices of the peace. What is your
    pleasure with me?

13 III / 2
  • He greets me well, sir; I knew him a good back-sword
    How doth the good knigh...
  • He greets me well, sir; I knew him a good back-sword
    How doth the good knight? May I ask how my lady his wife
  • Bardolph. My captain, sir, commends him to you; my captain, Sir
    John Falstaff--a tall gentleman, by heaven, and a most
    leader.

    Robert Shallow. He greets me well, sir; I knew him a good back-sword
    How doth the good knight? May I ask how my lady his wife

14 III / 2
  • It is well said, in faith, sir; and it is well said
    too. 'Better accommodate...
  • It is well said, in faith, sir; and it is well said
    too. 'Better accommodated!' It is good; yea, indeed, is it.
    phrases are surely, and ever were, very commendable.
    'Accommodated!' It comes of accommodo. Very good; a good
  • Bardolph. Sir, pardon; a soldier is better accommodated than
    wife.

    Robert Shallow. It is well said, in faith, sir; and it is well said
    too. 'Better accommodated!' It is good; yea, indeed, is it.
    phrases are surely, and ever were, very commendable.
    'Accommodated!' It comes of accommodo. Very good; a good

15 III / 2
  • It is very just. Look, here comes good Sir John. Give
    your good hand, give m...
  • It is very just. Look, here comes good Sir John. Give
    your good hand, give me your worship's good hand. By my
    you like well and bear your years very well. Welcome, good
    John.
  • Bardolph. Pardon, sir; I have heard the word. 'Phrase' call you
    By this day, I know not the phrase; but I will maintain the
    with my sword to be a soldier-like word, and a word of
    good command, by heaven. Accommodated: that is, when a man
    they say, accommodated; or, when a man is being-whereby 'a
    thought to be accommodated; which is an excellent thing.

    Robert Shallow. It is very just. Look, here comes good Sir John. Give
    your good hand, give me your worship's good hand. By my
    you like well and bear your years very well. Welcome, good
    John.

16 III / 2
  • No, Sir John; it is my cousin Silence, in commission with me.
  • No, Sir John; it is my cousin Silence, in commission with me.
  • Falstaff. I am glad to see you well, good Master Robert
    Master Surecard, as I think?

    Robert Shallow. No, Sir John; it is my cousin Silence, in commission with me.

17 III / 2
  • Marry, have we, sir. Will you sit?
  • Marry, have we, sir. Will you sit?
  • Falstaff. Fie! this is hot weather. Gentlemen, have you
    here half a dozen sufficient men?

    Robert Shallow. Marry, have we, sir. Will you sit?

18 III / 2
  • Where's the roll? Where's the roll? Where's the roll?
    me see, let me see, le...
  • Where's the roll? Where's the roll? Where's the roll?
    me see, let me see, let me see. So, so, so, so,--so, so--yea,
    marry, sir. Rafe Mouldy! Let them appear as I call; let them
    so, let them do so. Let me see; where is Mouldy?
  • Falstaff. Let me see them, I beseech you.

    Robert Shallow. Where's the roll? Where's the roll? Where's the roll?
    me see, let me see, let me see. So, so, so, so,--so, so--yea,
    marry, sir. Rafe Mouldy! Let them appear as I call; let them
    so, let them do so. Let me see; where is Mouldy?

19 III / 2
  • What think you, Sir John? A good-limb'd fellow; young,
    strong, and of good f...
  • What think you, Sir John? A good-limb'd fellow; young,
    strong, and of good friends.
  • Ralph Mouldy. Here, an't please you.

    Robert Shallow. What think you, Sir John? A good-limb'd fellow; young,
    strong, and of good friends.

20 III / 2
  • Ha, ha, ha! most excellent, i' faith! Things that are
    mouldy lack use. Very...
  • Ha, ha, ha! most excellent, i' faith! Things that are
    mouldy lack use. Very singular good! In faith, well said, Sir
    John; very well said.
  • Falstaff. 'Tis the more time thou wert us'd.

    Robert Shallow. Ha, ha, ha! most excellent, i' faith! Things that are
    mouldy lack use. Very singular good! In faith, well said, Sir
    John; very well said.

21 III / 2
  • Peace, fellow, peace; stand aside; know you where you
    For th' other, Sir Joh...
  • Peace, fellow, peace; stand aside; know you where you
    For th' other, Sir John--let me see. Simon Shadow!
  • Ralph Mouldy. Spent!

    Robert Shallow. Peace, fellow, peace; stand aside; know you where you
    For th' other, Sir John--let me see. Simon Shadow!

22 III / 2
  • Where's Shadow?
  • Where's Shadow?
  • Falstaff. Yea, marry, let me have him to sit under. He's like
    a cold soldier.

    Robert Shallow. Where's Shadow?

23 III / 2
  • Do you like him, Sir John?
  • Do you like him, Sir John?
  • Falstaff. Thy mother's son! Like enough; and thy father's
    So the son of the female is the shadow of the male. It is
    so indeed; but much of the father's substance!

    Robert Shallow. Do you like him, Sir John?

24 III / 2
  • Thomas Wart!
  • Thomas Wart!
  • Falstaff. Shadow will serve for summer. Prick him; for we have
    number of shadows fill up the muster-book.

    Robert Shallow. Thomas Wart!

25 III / 2
  • Shall I prick him, Sir John?
  • Shall I prick him, Sir John?
  • Falstaff. Thou art a very ragged wart.

    Robert Shallow. Shall I prick him, Sir John?

26 III / 2
  • Ha, ha, ha! You can do it, sir; you can do it. I
    you well. Francis Feeble!
  • Ha, ha, ha! You can do it, sir; you can do it. I
    you well. Francis Feeble!
  • Falstaff. It were superfluous; for his apparel is built upon
    back, and the whole frame stands upon pins. Prick him no

    Robert Shallow. Ha, ha, ha! You can do it, sir; you can do it. I
    you well. Francis Feeble!

27 III / 2
  • Shall I prick him, sir?
  • Shall I prick him, sir?
  • Francis Feeble. A woman's tailor, sir.

    Robert Shallow. Shall I prick him, sir?

28 III / 2
  • Peter Bullcalf o' th' green!
  • Peter Bullcalf o' th' green!
  • Falstaff. I am bound to thee, reverend Feeble. Who is next?

    Robert Shallow. Peter Bullcalf o' th' green!

29 III / 2
  • Here is two more call'd than your number. You must
    but four here, sir; and s...
  • Here is two more call'd than your number. You must
    but four here, sir; and so, I pray you, go in with me to
  • Falstaff. Come, thou shalt go to the wars in a gown. We will
    away thy cold; and I will take such order that thy friends
    ring for thee. Is here all?

    Robert Shallow. Here is two more call'd than your number. You must
    but four here, sir; and so, I pray you, go in with me to

30 III / 2
  • O, Sir John, do you remember since we lay all night in
    windmill in Saint Geo...
  • O, Sir John, do you remember since we lay all night in
    windmill in Saint George's Field?
  • Falstaff. Come, I will go drink with you, but I cannot tarry
    dinner. I am glad to see you, by my troth, Master Shallow.

    Robert Shallow. O, Sir John, do you remember since we lay all night in
    windmill in Saint George's Field?

31 III / 2
  • Ha, 'twas a merry night. And is Jane Nightwork alive?
  • Ha, 'twas a merry night. And is Jane Nightwork alive?
  • Falstaff. No more of that, Master Shallow, no more of that.

    Robert Shallow. Ha, 'twas a merry night. And is Jane Nightwork alive?

32 III / 2
  • She never could away with me.
  • She never could away with me.
  • Falstaff. She lives, Master Shallow.

    Robert Shallow. She never could away with me.

33 III / 2
  • By the mass, I could anger her to th' heart. She was
    a bona-roba. Doth she h...
  • By the mass, I could anger her to th' heart. She was
    a bona-roba. Doth she hold her own well?
  • Falstaff. Never, never; she would always say she could not
    Master Shallow.

    Robert Shallow. By the mass, I could anger her to th' heart. She was
    a bona-roba. Doth she hold her own well?

34 III / 2
  • Nay, she must be old; she cannot choose but be old;
    certain she's old; and h...
  • Nay, she must be old; she cannot choose but be old;
    certain she's old; and had Robin Nightwork, by old Nightwork,
    before I came to Clement's Inn.
  • Falstaff. Old, old, Master Shallow.

    Robert Shallow. Nay, she must be old; she cannot choose but be old;
    certain she's old; and had Robin Nightwork, by old Nightwork,
    before I came to Clement's Inn.

35 III / 2
  • Ha, cousin Silence, that thou hadst seen that that
    knight and I have seen! H...
  • Ha, cousin Silence, that thou hadst seen that that
    knight and I have seen! Ha, Sir John, said I well?
  • Silence. That's fifty-five year ago.

    Robert Shallow. Ha, cousin Silence, that thou hadst seen that that
    knight and I have seen! Ha, Sir John, said I well?

36 III / 2
  • That we have, that we have, that we have; in faith,
    John, we have. Our watch...
  • That we have, that we have, that we have; in faith,
    John, we have. Our watchword was 'Hem, boys!' Come, let's to
    dinner; come, let's to dinner. Jesus, the days that we have
    Come, come.
  • Falstaff. We have heard the chimes at midnight, Master Shallow.

    Robert Shallow. That we have, that we have, that we have; in faith,
    John, we have. Our watchword was 'Hem, boys!' Come, let's to
    dinner; come, let's to dinner. Jesus, the days that we have
    Come, come.

37 III / 2
  • Four of which you please.
  • Four of which you please.
  • Falstaff. Come, sir, which men shall I have?

    Robert Shallow. Four of which you please.

38 III / 2
  • Come, Sir John, which four will you have?
  • Come, Sir John, which four will you have?
  • Falstaff. Go to; well.

    Robert Shallow. Come, Sir John, which four will you have?

39 III / 2
  • Marry, then--Mouldy, Bullcalf, Feeble, and Shadow.
  • Marry, then--Mouldy, Bullcalf, Feeble, and Shadow.
  • Falstaff. Do you choose for me.

    Robert Shallow. Marry, then--Mouldy, Bullcalf, Feeble, and Shadow.

40 III / 2
  • Sir John, Sir John, do not yourself wrong. They are
    likeliest men, and I wou...
  • Sir John, Sir John, do not yourself wrong. They are
    likeliest men, and I would have you serv'd with the best.
  • Falstaff. Mouldy and Bullcalf: for you, Mouldy, stay at home
    you are past service; and for your part, Bullcalf, grow you
    unto it. I will none of you.

    Robert Shallow. Sir John, Sir John, do not yourself wrong. They are
    likeliest men, and I would have you serv'd with the best.

41 III / 2
  • He is not his craft's master, he doth not do it right.
    remember at Mile-end...
  • He is not his craft's master, he doth not do it right.
    remember at Mile-end Green, when I lay at Clement's Inn--I
    then Sir Dagonet in Arthur's show--there was a little quiver
    fellow, and 'a would manage you his piece thus; and 'a would
    about and about, and come you in and come you in. 'Rah, tah,
    tah!' would 'a say; 'Bounce!' would 'a say; and away again
    'a go, and again would 'a come. I shall ne'er see such a
  • Falstaff. Come, manage me your caliver. So--very well. Go to;
    good; exceeding good. O, give me always a little, lean, old,
    chopt, bald shot. Well said, i' faith, Wart; th'art a good
    Hold, there's a tester for thee.

    Robert Shallow. He is not his craft's master, he doth not do it right.
    remember at Mile-end Green, when I lay at Clement's Inn--I
    then Sir Dagonet in Arthur's show--there was a little quiver
    fellow, and 'a would manage you his piece thus; and 'a would
    about and about, and come you in and come you in. 'Rah, tah,
    tah!' would 'a say; 'Bounce!' would 'a say; and away again
    'a go, and again would 'a come. I shall ne'er see such a

42 III / 2
  • Sir John, the Lord bless you; God prosper your
    God send us peace! At your re...
  • Sir John, the Lord bless you; God prosper your
    God send us peace! At your return, visit our house; let our
    acquaintance be renewed. Peradventure I will with ye to the
    court.
  • Falstaff. These fellows will do well. Master Shallow, God keep
    Master Silence, I will not use many words with you: Fare you
    well! Gentlemen both, I thank you. I must a dozen mile
    Bardolph, give the soldiers coats.

    Robert Shallow. Sir John, the Lord bless you; God prosper your
    God send us peace! At your return, visit our house; let our
    acquaintance be renewed. Peradventure I will with ye to the
    court.

43 III / 2
  • Go to; I have spoke at a word. God keep you.
  • Go to; I have spoke at a word. God keep you.
  • Falstaff. Fore God, would you would.

    Robert Shallow. Go to; I have spoke at a word. God keep you.

44 V / 1
  • By cock and pie, sir, you shall not away to-night.
    What, Davy, I say!
  • By cock and pie, sir, you shall not away to-night.
    What, Davy, I say!
  • Henry IV. Laud be to God! Even there my life must end.
    It hath been prophesied to me many years,
    I should not die but in Jerusalem;
    Which vainly I suppos'd the Holy Land.
    But bear me to that chamber; there I'll lie;
    In that Jerusalem shall Harry die. Exeunt

    Robert Shallow. By cock and pie, sir, you shall not away to-night.
    What, Davy, I say!

45 V / 1
  • I will not excuse you; you shall not be excus'd;
    shall not be admitted; ther...
  • I will not excuse you; you shall not be excus'd;
    shall not be admitted; there is no excuse shall serve; you
    not be excus'd. Why, Davy!
  • Falstaff. You must excuse me, Master Robert Shallow.

    Robert Shallow. I will not excuse you; you shall not be excus'd;
    shall not be admitted; there is no excuse shall serve; you
    not be excus'd. Why, Davy!

46 V / 1
  • Davy, Davy, Davy, Davy; let me see, Davy; let me see,
    Davy; let me see--yea,...
  • Davy, Davy, Davy, Davy; let me see, Davy; let me see,
    Davy; let me see--yea, marry, William cook, bid him come
    Sir John, you shall not be excus'd.
  • Davy. Here, sir.

    Robert Shallow. Davy, Davy, Davy, Davy; let me see, Davy; let me see,
    Davy; let me see--yea, marry, William cook, bid him come
    Sir John, you shall not be excus'd.

47 V / 1
  • With red wheat, Davy. But for William cook--are there
    young pigeons?
  • With red wheat, Davy. But for William cook--are there
    young pigeons?
  • Davy. Marry, sir, thus: those precepts cannot be served; and,
    again, sir--shall we sow the headland with wheat?

    Robert Shallow. With red wheat, Davy. But for William cook--are there
    young pigeons?

48 V / 1
  • Let it be cast, and paid. Sir John, you shall not be
    excused.
  • Let it be cast, and paid. Sir John, you shall not be
    excused.
  • Davy. Yes, sir. Here is now the smith's note for shoeing and
    plough-irons.

    Robert Shallow. Let it be cast, and paid. Sir John, you shall not be
    excused.

49 V / 1
  • 'A shall answer it. Some pigeons, Davy, a couple of
    short-legg'd hens, a joi...
  • 'A shall answer it. Some pigeons, Davy, a couple of
    short-legg'd hens, a joint of mutton, and any pretty little
    kickshaws, tell William cook.
  • Davy. Now, sir, a new link to the bucket must needs be had;
    sir, do you mean to stop any of William's wages about the
    lost the other day at Hinckley fair?

    Robert Shallow. 'A shall answer it. Some pigeons, Davy, a couple of
    short-legg'd hens, a joint of mutton, and any pretty little
    kickshaws, tell William cook.

50 V / 1
  • Yea, Davy; I will use him well. A friend i' th' court
    better than a penny in...
  • Yea, Davy; I will use him well. A friend i' th' court
    better than a penny in purse. Use his men well, Davy; for
    are arrant knaves and will backbite.
  • Davy. Doth the man of war stay all night, sir?

    Robert Shallow. Yea, Davy; I will use him well. A friend i' th' court
    better than a penny in purse. Use his men well, Davy; for
    are arrant knaves and will backbite.

51 V / 1
  • Well conceited, Davy--about thy business, Davy.
  • Well conceited, Davy--about thy business, Davy.
  • Davy. No worse than they are backbitten, sir; for they have
    marvellous foul linen.

    Robert Shallow. Well conceited, Davy--about thy business, Davy.

52 V / 1
  • There, is many complaints, Davy, against that Visor.
    Visor is an arrant knav...
  • There, is many complaints, Davy, against that Visor.
    Visor is an arrant knave, on my knowledge.
  • Davy. I beseech you, sir, to countenance William Visor of
    against Clement Perkes o' th' hill.

    Robert Shallow. There, is many complaints, Davy, against that Visor.
    Visor is an arrant knave, on my knowledge.

53 V / 1
  • Go to; I say he shall have no wrong. Look about,
  • Go to; I say he shall have no wrong. Look about,
  • Davy. I grant your worship that he is a knave, sir; but yet God
    forbid, sir, but a knave should have some countenance at his
    friend's request. An honest man, sir, is able to speak for
    himself, when a knave is not. I have serv'd your worship
    sir, this eight years; an I cannot once or twice in a quarter
    bear out a knave against an honest man, I have but a very
    credit with your worship. The knave is mine honest friend,
    therefore, I beseech you, let him be countenanc'd.

    Robert Shallow. Go to; I say he shall have no wrong. Look about,

54 V / 1
  • I thank thee with all my heart, kind Master Bardolph.
    [To the PAGE] And welc...
  • I thank thee with all my heart, kind Master Bardolph.
    [To the PAGE] And welcome, my tall fellow. Come, Sir John.
  • Bardolph. I am glad to see your worship.

    Robert Shallow. I thank thee with all my heart, kind Master Bardolph.
    [To the PAGE] And welcome, my tall fellow. Come, Sir John.

55 V / 1
  • [Within] Sir John!
  • [Within] Sir John!
  • Falstaff. I'll follow you, good Master Robert Shallow.
    [Exit SHALLOW] Bardolph, look to our horses. [Exeunt
    and PAGE] If I were sawed into quantities, I should make
    dozen of such bearded hermits' staves as Master Shallow. It
    wonderful thing to see the semblable coherence of his men's
    spirits and his. They, by observing of him, do bear
    like foolish justices: he, by conversing with them, is turned
    into a justice-like serving-man. Their spirits are so married
    conjunction with the participation of society that they flock
    together in consent, like so many wild geese. If I had a suit
    Master Shallow, I would humour his men with the imputation of
    being near their master; if to his men, I would curry with
    Shallow that no man could better command his servants. It is
    certain that either wise bearing or ignorant carriage is
    as men take diseases, one of another; therefore let men take
    of their company. I will devise matter enough out of this
    to keep Prince Harry in continual laughter the wearing out of
    fashions, which is four terms, or two actions; and 'a shall
    without intervallums. O, it is much that a lie with a slight
    oath, and a jest with a sad brow will do with a fellow that
    had the ache in his shoulders! O, you shall see him laugh
    his face be like a wet cloak ill laid up!

    Robert Shallow. [Within] Sir John!

56 V / 3
  • Nay, you shall see my orchard, where, in an arbour, we
    will eat a last year'...
  • Nay, you shall see my orchard, where, in an arbour, we
    will eat a last year's pippin of mine own graffing, with a
    of caraways, and so forth. Come, cousin Silence. And then to
  • Henry V. You are right, Justice, and you weigh this well;
    Therefore still bear the balance and the sword;
    And I do wish your honours may increase
    Till you do live to see a son of mine
    Offend you, and obey you, as I did.
    So shall I live to speak my father's words:
    'Happy am I that have a man so bold
    That dares do justice on my proper son;
    And not less happy, having such a son
    That would deliver up his greatness so
    Into the hands of justice.' You did commit me;
    For which I do commit into your hand
    Th' unstained sword that you have us'd to bear;
    With this remembrance--that you use the same
    With the like bold, just, and impartial spirit
    As you have done 'gainst me. There is my hand.
    You shall be as a father to my youth;
    My voice shall sound as you do prompt mine ear;
    And I will stoop and humble my intents
    To your well-practis'd wise directions.
    And, Princes all, believe me, I beseech you,
    My father is gone wild into his grave,
    For in his tomb lie my affections;
    And with his spirits sadly I survive,
    To mock the expectation of the world,
    To frustrate prophecies, and to raze out
    Rotten opinion, who hath writ me down
    After my seeming. The tide of blood in me
    Hath proudly flow'd in vanity till now.
    Now doth it turn and ebb back to the sea,
    Where it shall mingle with the state of floods,
    And flow henceforth in formal majesty.
    Now call we our high court of parliament;
    And let us choose such limbs of noble counsel,
    That the great body of our state may go
    In equal rank with the best govern'd nation;
    That war, or peace, or both at once, may be
    As things acquainted and familiar to us;
    In which you, father, shall have foremost hand.
    Our coronation done, we will accite,
    As I before rememb'red, all our state;
    And--God consigning to my good intents-
    No prince nor peer shall have just cause to say,
    God shorten Harry's happy life one day. Exeunt

    Robert Shallow. Nay, you shall see my orchard, where, in an arbour, we
    will eat a last year's pippin of mine own graffing, with a
    of caraways, and so forth. Come, cousin Silence. And then to

57 V / 3
  • Barren, barren, barren; beggars all, beggars all, Sir
    -marry, good air. Spre...
  • Barren, barren, barren; beggars all, beggars all, Sir
    -marry, good air. Spread, Davy, spread, Davy; well said,
  • Falstaff. Fore God, you have here a goodly dwelling and rich.

    Robert Shallow. Barren, barren, barren; beggars all, beggars all, Sir
    -marry, good air. Spread, Davy, spread, Davy; well said,

58 V / 3
  • A good varlet, a good varlet, a very good varlet, Sir
    John. By the mass, I h...
  • A good varlet, a good varlet, a very good varlet, Sir
    John. By the mass, I have drunk too much sack at supper. A
    varlet. Now sit down, now sit down; come, cousin.
  • Falstaff. This Davy serves you for good uses; he is your
    serving-man and your husband.

    Robert Shallow. A good varlet, a good varlet, a very good varlet, Sir
    John. By the mass, I have drunk too much sack at supper. A
    varlet. Now sit down, now sit down; come, cousin.

59 V / 3
  • Give Master Bardolph some wine, Davy.
  • Give Master Bardolph some wine, Davy.
  • Falstaff. There's a merry heart! Good Master Silence, I'll give
    a health for that anon.

    Robert Shallow. Give Master Bardolph some wine, Davy.

60 V / 3
  • Be merry, Master Bardolph; and, my little soldier
    be merry.
  • Be merry, Master Bardolph; and, my little soldier
    be merry.
  • Davy. Sweet sir, sit; I'll be with you anon; most sweet sir,
    Master Page, good Master Page, sit. Proface! What you want in
    meat, we'll have in drink. But you must bear; the heart's

    Robert Shallow. Be merry, Master Bardolph; and, my little soldier
    be merry.

61 V / 3
  • Davy!
  • Davy!
  • Davy. [To BARDOLPH] There's a dish of leather-coats for you.

    Robert Shallow. Davy!

62 V / 3
  • Honest Bardolph, welcome; if thou want'st anything and
    wilt not call, beshre...
  • Honest Bardolph, welcome; if thou want'st anything and
    wilt not call, beshrew thy heart. Welcome, my little tiny
    and welcome indeed too. I'll drink to Master Bardolph, and to
    the cabileros about London.
  • Silence. [Singing]
    Fill the cup, and let it come,
    I'll pledge you a mile to th' bottom.

    Robert Shallow. Honest Bardolph, welcome; if thou want'st anything and
    wilt not call, beshrew thy heart. Welcome, my little tiny
    and welcome indeed too. I'll drink to Master Bardolph, and to
    the cabileros about London.

63 V / 3
  • By the mass, you'll crack a quart together--ha! will
    not, Master Bardolph?
  • By the mass, you'll crack a quart together--ha! will
    not, Master Bardolph?
  • Bardolph. An I might see you there, Davy!

    Robert Shallow. By the mass, you'll crack a quart together--ha! will
    not, Master Bardolph?

64 V / 3
  • By God's liggens, I thank thee. The knave will stick
    thee, I can assure thee...
  • By God's liggens, I thank thee. The knave will stick
    thee, I can assure thee that. 'A will not out, 'a; 'tis true
    bred.
  • Bardolph. Yea, sir, in a pottle-pot.

    Robert Shallow. By God's liggens, I thank thee. The knave will stick
    thee, I can assure thee that. 'A will not out, 'a; 'tis true
    bred.

65 V / 3
  • Why, there spoke a king. Lack nothing; be merry.
    [One knocks at door] Look w...
  • Why, there spoke a king. Lack nothing; be merry.
    [One knocks at door] Look who's at door there, ho! Who
  • Bardolph. And I'll stick by him, sir.

    Robert Shallow. Why, there spoke a king. Lack nothing; be merry.
    [One knocks at door] Look who's at door there, ho! Who

66 V / 3
  • Honest gentleman, I know not your breeding.
  • Honest gentleman, I know not your breeding.
  • Pistol. Shall dunghill curs confront the Helicons?
    And shall good news be baffled?
    Then, Pistol, lay thy head in Furies' lap.

    Robert Shallow. Honest gentleman, I know not your breeding.

67 V / 3
  • Give me pardon, sir. If, sir, you come with news from
    court, I take it there...
  • Give me pardon, sir. If, sir, you come with news from
    court, I take it there's but two ways--either to utter them
    conceal them. I am, sir, under the King, in some authority.
  • Pistol. Why, then, lament therefore.

    Robert Shallow. Give me pardon, sir. If, sir, you come with news from
    court, I take it there's but two ways--either to utter them
    conceal them. I am, sir, under the King, in some authority.

68 V / 3
  • Under King Harry.
  • Under King Harry.
  • Pistol. Under which king, Bezonian? Speak, or die.

    Robert Shallow. Under King Harry.

69 V / 3
  • Harry the Fourth.
  • Harry the Fourth.
  • Pistol. Harry the Fourth--or Fifth?

    Robert Shallow. Harry the Fourth.

70 V / 5
  • It doth so.
  • It doth so.
  • Falstaff. Come here, Pistol; stand behind me. [To SHALLOW] O, if
    I had had to have made new liveries, I would have bestowed the
    thousand pound I borrowed of you. But 'tis no matter; this poor
    show doth better; this doth infer the zeal I had to see him.

    Robert Shallow. It doth so.

71 V / 5
  • It doth so.
  • It doth so.
  • Falstaff. It shows my earnestness of affection-

    Robert Shallow. It doth so.

72 V / 5
  • It doth, it doth, it doth.
  • It doth, it doth, it doth.
  • Falstaff. My devotion--

    Robert Shallow. It doth, it doth, it doth.

73 V / 5
  • It is best, certain.
  • It is best, certain.
  • Falstaff. As it were, to ride day and night; and not to
    not to remember, not to have patience to shift me--

    Robert Shallow. It is best, certain.

74 V / 5
  • 'Tis so, indeed.
  • 'Tis so, indeed.
  • Pistol. 'Tis 'semper idem' for 'obsque hoc nihil est.' 'Tis all
    every part.

    Robert Shallow. 'Tis so, indeed.

75 V / 5
  • Yea, marry, Sir John; which I beseech you to let me
    home with me.
  • Yea, marry, Sir John; which I beseech you to let me
    home with me.
  • Falstaff. Master Shallow, I owe you a thousand pounds.

    Robert Shallow. Yea, marry, Sir John; which I beseech you to let me
    home with me.

76 V / 5
  • I cannot perceive how, unless you give me your
    and stuff me out with straw....
  • I cannot perceive how, unless you give me your
    and stuff me out with straw. I beseech you, good Sir John,
    have five hundred of my thousand.
  • Falstaff. That can hardly be, Master Shallow. Do not you grieve
    this; I shall be sent for in private to him. Look you, he
    seem thus to the world. Fear not your advancements; I will be
    man yet that shall make you great.

    Robert Shallow. I cannot perceive how, unless you give me your
    and stuff me out with straw. I beseech you, good Sir John,
    have five hundred of my thousand.

77 V / 5
  • A colour that I fear you will die in, Sir John.
  • A colour that I fear you will die in, Sir John.
  • Falstaff. Sir, I will be as good as my word. This that you
    was but a colour.

    Robert Shallow. A colour that I fear you will die in, Sir John.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.