Speeches (Lines) for Shylock in "The Merchant of Venice"

Total: 79
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 3
  • Three thousand ducats; well.
  • Three thousand ducats; well.
  • Portia. If I could bid the fifth welcome with so good a
    heart as I can bid the other four farewell, I should
    be glad of his approach: if he have the condition
    of a saint and the complexion of a devil, I had
    rather he should shrive me than wive me. Come,
    Nerissa. Sirrah, go before.
    Whiles we shut the gates
    upon one wooer, another knocks at the door.

    Shylock. Three thousand ducats; well.

2 I / 3
  • For three months; well.
  • For three months; well.
  • Bassanio. Ay, sir, for three months.

    Shylock. For three months; well.

3 I / 3
  • Antonio shall become bound; well.
  • Antonio shall become bound; well.
  • Bassanio. For the which, as I told you, Antonio shall be bound.

    Shylock. Antonio shall become bound; well.

4 I / 3
  • Three thousand ducats for three months and Antonio bound.
  • Three thousand ducats for three months and Antonio bound.
  • Bassanio. May you stead me? will you pleasure me? shall I
    know your answer?

    Shylock. Three thousand ducats for three months and Antonio bound.

5 I / 3
  • Antonio is a good man.
  • Antonio is a good man.
  • Bassanio. Your answer to that.

    Shylock. Antonio is a good man.

6 I / 3
  • Oh, no, no, no, no: my meaning in saying he is a
    good man is to have you und...
  • Oh, no, no, no, no: my meaning in saying he is a
    good man is to have you understand me that he is
    sufficient. Yet his means are in supposition: he
    hath an argosy bound to Tripolis, another to the
    Indies; I understand moreover, upon the Rialto, he
    hath a third at Mexico, a fourth for England, and
    other ventures he hath, squandered abroad. But ships
    are but boards, sailors but men: there be land-rats
    and water-rats, water-thieves and land-thieves, I
    mean pirates, and then there is the peril of waters,
    winds and rocks. The man is, notwithstanding,
    sufficient. Three thousand ducats; I think I may
    take his bond.
  • Bassanio. Have you heard any imputation to the contrary?

    Shylock. Oh, no, no, no, no: my meaning in saying he is a
    good man is to have you understand me that he is
    sufficient. Yet his means are in supposition: he
    hath an argosy bound to Tripolis, another to the
    Indies; I understand moreover, upon the Rialto, he
    hath a third at Mexico, a fourth for England, and
    other ventures he hath, squandered abroad. But ships
    are but boards, sailors but men: there be land-rats
    and water-rats, water-thieves and land-thieves, I
    mean pirates, and then there is the peril of waters,
    winds and rocks. The man is, notwithstanding,
    sufficient. Three thousand ducats; I think I may
    take his bond.

7 I / 3
  • I will be assured I may; and, that I may be assured,
    I will bethink me. May...
  • I will be assured I may; and, that I may be assured,
    I will bethink me. May I speak with Antonio?
  • Bassanio. Be assured you may.

    Shylock. I will be assured I may; and, that I may be assured,
    I will bethink me. May I speak with Antonio?

8 I / 3
  • Yes, to smell pork; to eat of the habitation which
    your prophet the Nazarite...
  • Yes, to smell pork; to eat of the habitation which
    your prophet the Nazarite conjured the devil into. I
    will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you,
    walk with you, and so following, but I will not eat
    with you, drink with you, nor pray with you. What
    news on the Rialto? Who is he comes here?
  • Bassanio. If it please you to dine with us.

    Shylock. Yes, to smell pork; to eat of the habitation which
    your prophet the Nazarite conjured the devil into. I
    will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you,
    walk with you, and so following, but I will not eat
    with you, drink with you, nor pray with you. What
    news on the Rialto? Who is he comes here?

9 I / 3
  • [Aside] How like a fawning publican he looks!
    I hate him for he is a Christi...
  • [Aside] How like a fawning publican he looks!
    I hate him for he is a Christian,
    But more for that in low simplicity
    He lends out money gratis and brings down
    The rate of usance here with us in Venice.
    If I can catch him once upon the hip,
    I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
    He hates our sacred nation, and he rails,
    Even there where merchants most do congregate,
    On me, my bargains and my well-won thrift,
    Which he calls interest. Cursed be my tribe,
    If I forgive him!
  • Bassanio. This is Signior Antonio.

    Shylock. [Aside] How like a fawning publican he looks!
    I hate him for he is a Christian,
    But more for that in low simplicity
    He lends out money gratis and brings down
    The rate of usance here with us in Venice.
    If I can catch him once upon the hip,
    I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
    He hates our sacred nation, and he rails,
    Even there where merchants most do congregate,
    On me, my bargains and my well-won thrift,
    Which he calls interest. Cursed be my tribe,
    If I forgive him!

10 I / 3
  • I am debating of my present store,
    And, by the near guess of my memory,
    ...
  • I am debating of my present store,
    And, by the near guess of my memory,
    I cannot instantly raise up the gross
    Of full three thousand ducats. What of that?
    Tubal, a wealthy Hebrew of my tribe,
    Will furnish me. But soft! how many months
    Do you desire?
    [To ANTONIO]
    Rest you fair, good signior;
    Your worship was the last man in our mouths.
  • Bassanio. Shylock, do you hear?

    Shylock. I am debating of my present store,
    And, by the near guess of my memory,
    I cannot instantly raise up the gross
    Of full three thousand ducats. What of that?
    Tubal, a wealthy Hebrew of my tribe,
    Will furnish me. But soft! how many months
    Do you desire?
    [To ANTONIO]
    Rest you fair, good signior;
    Your worship was the last man in our mouths.

11 I / 3
  • Ay, ay, three thousand ducats.
  • Ay, ay, three thousand ducats.
  • Antonio. Shylock, although I neither lend nor borrow
    By taking nor by giving of excess,
    Yet, to supply the ripe wants of my friend,
    I'll break a custom. Is he yet possess'd
    How much ye would?

    Shylock. Ay, ay, three thousand ducats.

12 I / 3
  • I had forgot; three months; you told me so.
    Well then, your bond; and let me...
  • I had forgot; three months; you told me so.
    Well then, your bond; and let me see; but hear you;
    Methought you said you neither lend nor borrow
    Upon advantage.
  • Antonio. And for three months.

    Shylock. I had forgot; three months; you told me so.
    Well then, your bond; and let me see; but hear you;
    Methought you said you neither lend nor borrow
    Upon advantage.

13 I / 3
  • When Jacob grazed his uncle Laban's sheep--
    This Jacob from our holy Abram w...
  • When Jacob grazed his uncle Laban's sheep--
    This Jacob from our holy Abram was,
    As his wise mother wrought in his behalf,
    The third possessor; ay, he was the third--
  • Antonio. I do never use it.

    Shylock. When Jacob grazed his uncle Laban's sheep--
    This Jacob from our holy Abram was,
    As his wise mother wrought in his behalf,
    The third possessor; ay, he was the third--

14 I / 3
  • No, not take interest, not, as you would say,
    Directly interest: mark what J...
  • No, not take interest, not, as you would say,
    Directly interest: mark what Jacob did.
    When Laban and himself were compromised
    That all the eanlings which were streak'd and pied
    Should fall as Jacob's hire, the ewes, being rank,
    In the end of autumn turned to the rams,
    And, when the work of generation was
    Between these woolly breeders in the act,
    The skilful shepherd peel'd me certain wands,
    And, in the doing of the deed of kind,
    He stuck them up before the fulsome ewes,
    Who then conceiving did in eaning time
    Fall parti-colour'd lambs, and those were Jacob's.
    This was a way to thrive, and he was blest:
    And thrift is blessing, if men steal it not.
  • Antonio. And what of him? did he take interest?

    Shylock. No, not take interest, not, as you would say,
    Directly interest: mark what Jacob did.
    When Laban and himself were compromised
    That all the eanlings which were streak'd and pied
    Should fall as Jacob's hire, the ewes, being rank,
    In the end of autumn turned to the rams,
    And, when the work of generation was
    Between these woolly breeders in the act,
    The skilful shepherd peel'd me certain wands,
    And, in the doing of the deed of kind,
    He stuck them up before the fulsome ewes,
    Who then conceiving did in eaning time
    Fall parti-colour'd lambs, and those were Jacob's.
    This was a way to thrive, and he was blest:
    And thrift is blessing, if men steal it not.

15 I / 3
  • I cannot tell; I make it breed as fast:
    But note me, signior.
  • I cannot tell; I make it breed as fast:
    But note me, signior.
  • Antonio. This was a venture, sir, that Jacob served for;
    A thing not in his power to bring to pass,
    But sway'd and fashion'd by the hand of heaven.
    Was this inserted to make interest good?
    Or is your gold and silver ewes and rams?

    Shylock. I cannot tell; I make it breed as fast:
    But note me, signior.

16 I / 3
  • Three thousand ducats; 'tis a good round sum.
    Three months from twelve; then...
  • Three thousand ducats; 'tis a good round sum.
    Three months from twelve; then, let me see; the rate--
  • Antonio. Mark you this, Bassanio,
    The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
    An evil soul producing holy witness
    Is like a villain with a smiling cheek,
    A goodly apple rotten at the heart:
    O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!

    Shylock. Three thousand ducats; 'tis a good round sum.
    Three months from twelve; then, let me see; the rate--

17 I / 3
  • Signior Antonio, many a time and oft
    In the Rialto you have rated me
    Abo...
  • Signior Antonio, many a time and oft
    In the Rialto you have rated me
    About my moneys and my usances:
    Still have I borne it with a patient shrug,
    For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
    You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
    And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine,
    And all for use of that which is mine own.
    Well then, it now appears you need my help:
    Go to, then; you come to me, and you say
    'Shylock, we would have moneys:' you say so;
    You, that did void your rheum upon my beard
    And foot me as you spurn a stranger cur
    Over your threshold: moneys is your suit
    What should I say to you? Should I not say
    'Hath a dog money? is it possible
    A cur can lend three thousand ducats?' Or
    Shall I bend low and in a bondman's key,
    With bated breath and whispering humbleness, Say this;
    'Fair sir, you spit on me on Wednesday last;
    You spurn'd me such a day; another time
    You call'd me dog; and for these courtesies
    I'll lend you thus much moneys'?
  • Antonio. Well, Shylock, shall we be beholding to you?

    Shylock. Signior Antonio, many a time and oft
    In the Rialto you have rated me
    About my moneys and my usances:
    Still have I borne it with a patient shrug,
    For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
    You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
    And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine,
    And all for use of that which is mine own.
    Well then, it now appears you need my help:
    Go to, then; you come to me, and you say
    'Shylock, we would have moneys:' you say so;
    You, that did void your rheum upon my beard
    And foot me as you spurn a stranger cur
    Over your threshold: moneys is your suit
    What should I say to you? Should I not say
    'Hath a dog money? is it possible
    A cur can lend three thousand ducats?' Or
    Shall I bend low and in a bondman's key,
    With bated breath and whispering humbleness, Say this;
    'Fair sir, you spit on me on Wednesday last;
    You spurn'd me such a day; another time
    You call'd me dog; and for these courtesies
    I'll lend you thus much moneys'?

18 I / 3
  • Why, look you, how you storm!
    I would be friends with you and have your love...
  • Why, look you, how you storm!
    I would be friends with you and have your love,
    Forget the shames that you have stain'd me with,
    Supply your present wants and take no doit
    Of usance for my moneys, and you'll not hear me:
    This is kind I offer.
  • Antonio. I am as like to call thee so again,
    To spit on thee again, to spurn thee too.
    If thou wilt lend this money, lend it not
    As to thy friends; for when did friendship take
    A breed for barren metal of his friend?
    But lend it rather to thine enemy,
    Who, if he break, thou mayst with better face
    Exact the penalty.

    Shylock. Why, look you, how you storm!
    I would be friends with you and have your love,
    Forget the shames that you have stain'd me with,
    Supply your present wants and take no doit
    Of usance for my moneys, and you'll not hear me:
    This is kind I offer.

19 I / 3
  • This kindness will I show.
    Go with me to a notary, seal me there
    Your si...
  • This kindness will I show.
    Go with me to a notary, seal me there
    Your single bond; and, in a merry sport,
    If you repay me not on such a day,
    In such a place, such sum or sums as are
    Express'd in the condition, let the forfeit
    Be nominated for an equal pound
    Of your fair flesh, to be cut off and taken
    In what part of your body pleaseth me.
  • Bassanio. This were kindness.

    Shylock. This kindness will I show.
    Go with me to a notary, seal me there
    Your single bond; and, in a merry sport,
    If you repay me not on such a day,
    In such a place, such sum or sums as are
    Express'd in the condition, let the forfeit
    Be nominated for an equal pound
    Of your fair flesh, to be cut off and taken
    In what part of your body pleaseth me.

20 I / 3
  • O father Abram, what these Christians are,
    Whose own hard dealings teaches t...
  • O father Abram, what these Christians are,
    Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect
    The thoughts of others! Pray you, tell me this;
    If he should break his day, what should I gain
    By the exaction of the forfeiture?
    A pound of man's flesh taken from a man
    Is not so estimable, profitable neither,
    As flesh of muttons, beefs, or goats. I say,
    To buy his favour, I extend this friendship:
    If he will take it, so; if not, adieu;
    And, for my love, I pray you wrong me not.
  • Antonio. Why, fear not, man; I will not forfeit it:
    Within these two months, that's a month before
    This bond expires, I do expect return
    Of thrice three times the value of this bond.

    Shylock. O father Abram, what these Christians are,
    Whose own hard dealings teaches them suspect
    The thoughts of others! Pray you, tell me this;
    If he should break his day, what should I gain
    By the exaction of the forfeiture?
    A pound of man's flesh taken from a man
    Is not so estimable, profitable neither,
    As flesh of muttons, beefs, or goats. I say,
    To buy his favour, I extend this friendship:
    If he will take it, so; if not, adieu;
    And, for my love, I pray you wrong me not.

21 I / 3
  • Then meet me forthwith at the notary's;
    Give him direction for this merry bo...
  • Then meet me forthwith at the notary's;
    Give him direction for this merry bond,
    And I will go and purse the ducats straight,
    See to my house, left in the fearful guard
    Of an unthrifty knave, and presently
    I will be with you.
  • Antonio. Yes Shylock, I will seal unto this bond.

    Shylock. Then meet me forthwith at the notary's;
    Give him direction for this merry bond,
    And I will go and purse the ducats straight,
    See to my house, left in the fearful guard
    Of an unthrifty knave, and presently
    I will be with you.

22 II / 5
  • Well, thou shalt see, thy eyes shall be thy judge,
    The difference of old Shy...
  • Well, thou shalt see, thy eyes shall be thy judge,
    The difference of old Shylock and Bassanio:--
    What, Jessica!--thou shalt not gormandise,
    As thou hast done with me:--What, Jessica!--
    And sleep and snore, and rend apparel out;--
    Why, Jessica, I say!
  • Lorenzo. I must needs tell thee all. She hath directed
    How I shall take her from her father's house,
    What gold and jewels she is furnish'd with,
    What page's suit she hath in readiness.
    If e'er the Jew her father come to heaven,
    It will be for his gentle daughter's sake:
    And never dare misfortune cross her foot,
    Unless she do it under this excuse,
    That she is issue to a faithless Jew.
    Come, go with me; peruse this as thou goest:
    Fair Jessica shall be my torch-bearer.

    Shylock. Well, thou shalt see, thy eyes shall be thy judge,
    The difference of old Shylock and Bassanio:--
    What, Jessica!--thou shalt not gormandise,
    As thou hast done with me:--What, Jessica!--
    And sleep and snore, and rend apparel out;--
    Why, Jessica, I say!

23 II / 5
  • Who bids thee call? I do not bid thee call.
  • Who bids thee call? I do not bid thee call.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. Why, Jessica!

    Shylock. Who bids thee call? I do not bid thee call.

24 II / 5
  • I am bid forth to supper, Jessica:
    There are my keys. But wherefore should I...
  • I am bid forth to supper, Jessica:
    There are my keys. But wherefore should I go?
    I am not bid for love; they flatter me:
    But yet I'll go in hate, to feed upon
    The prodigal Christian. Jessica, my girl,
    Look to my house. I am right loath to go:
    There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest,
    For I did dream of money-bags to-night.
  • Jessica. Call you? what is your will?

    Shylock. I am bid forth to supper, Jessica:
    There are my keys. But wherefore should I go?
    I am not bid for love; they flatter me:
    But yet I'll go in hate, to feed upon
    The prodigal Christian. Jessica, my girl,
    Look to my house. I am right loath to go:
    There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest,
    For I did dream of money-bags to-night.

25 II / 5
  • So do I his.
  • So do I his.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. I beseech you, sir, go: my young master doth expect
    your reproach.

    Shylock. So do I his.

26 II / 5
  • What, are there masques? Hear you me, Jessica:
    Lock up my doors; and when yo...
  • What, are there masques? Hear you me, Jessica:
    Lock up my doors; and when you hear the drum
    And the vile squealing of the wry-neck'd fife,
    Clamber not you up to the casements then,
    Nor thrust your head into the public street
    To gaze on Christian fools with varnish'd faces,
    But stop my house's ears, I mean my casements:
    Let not the sound of shallow foppery enter
    My sober house. By Jacob's staff, I swear,
    I have no mind of feasting forth to-night:
    But I will go. Go you before me, sirrah;
    Say I will come.
  • Launcelot Gobbo. An they have conspired together, I will not say you
    shall see a masque; but if you do, then it was not
    for nothing that my nose fell a-bleeding on
    Black-Monday last at six o'clock i' the morning,
    falling out that year on Ash-Wednesday was four
    year, in the afternoon.

    Shylock. What, are there masques? Hear you me, Jessica:
    Lock up my doors; and when you hear the drum
    And the vile squealing of the wry-neck'd fife,
    Clamber not you up to the casements then,
    Nor thrust your head into the public street
    To gaze on Christian fools with varnish'd faces,
    But stop my house's ears, I mean my casements:
    Let not the sound of shallow foppery enter
    My sober house. By Jacob's staff, I swear,
    I have no mind of feasting forth to-night:
    But I will go. Go you before me, sirrah;
    Say I will come.

27 II / 5
  • What says that fool of Hagar's offspring, ha?
  • What says that fool of Hagar's offspring, ha?
  • Launcelot Gobbo. I will go before, sir. Mistress, look out at
    window, for all this, There will come a Christian
    boy, will be worth a Jewess' eye.

    Shylock. What says that fool of Hagar's offspring, ha?

28 II / 5
  • The patch is kind enough, but a huge feeder;
    Snail-slow in profit, and he sl...
  • The patch is kind enough, but a huge feeder;
    Snail-slow in profit, and he sleeps by day
    More than the wild-cat: drones hive not with me;
    Therefore I part with him, and part with him
    To one that would have him help to waste
    His borrow'd purse. Well, Jessica, go in;
    Perhaps I will return immediately:
    Do as I bid you; shut doors after you:
    Fast bind, fast find;
    A proverb never stale in thrifty mind.
  • Jessica. His words were 'Farewell mistress;' nothing else.

    Shylock. The patch is kind enough, but a huge feeder;
    Snail-slow in profit, and he sleeps by day
    More than the wild-cat: drones hive not with me;
    Therefore I part with him, and part with him
    To one that would have him help to waste
    His borrow'd purse. Well, Jessica, go in;
    Perhaps I will return immediately:
    Do as I bid you; shut doors after you:
    Fast bind, fast find;
    A proverb never stale in thrifty mind.

29 III / 1
  • You know, none so well, none so well as you, of my
    daughter's flight.
  • You know, none so well, none so well as you, of my
    daughter's flight.
  • Salanio. Let me say 'amen' betimes, lest the devil cross my
    prayer, for here he comes in the likeness of a Jew.
    [Enter SHYLOCK]
    How now, Shylock! what news among the merchants?

    Shylock. You know, none so well, none so well as you, of my
    daughter's flight.

30 III / 1
  • She is damned for it.
  • She is damned for it.
  • Salanio. And Shylock, for his own part, knew the bird was
    fledged; and then it is the complexion of them all
    to leave the dam.

    Shylock. She is damned for it.

31 III / 1
  • My own flesh and blood to rebel!
  • My own flesh and blood to rebel!
  • Salanio. That's certain, if the devil may be her judge.

    Shylock. My own flesh and blood to rebel!

32 III / 1
  • I say, my daughter is my flesh and blood.
  • I say, my daughter is my flesh and blood.
  • Salanio. Out upon it, old carrion! rebels it at these years?

    Shylock. I say, my daughter is my flesh and blood.

33 III / 1
  • There I have another bad match: a bankrupt, a
    prodigal, who dare scarce show...
  • There I have another bad match: a bankrupt, a
    prodigal, who dare scarce show his head on the
    Rialto; a beggar, that was used to come so smug upon
    the mart; let him look to his bond: he was wont to
    call me usurer; let him look to his bond: he was
    wont to lend money for a Christian courtesy; let him
    look to his bond.
  • Salarino. There is more difference between thy flesh and hers
    than between jet and ivory; more between your bloods
    than there is between red wine and rhenish. But
    tell us, do you hear whether Antonio have had any
    loss at sea or no?

    Shylock. There I have another bad match: a bankrupt, a
    prodigal, who dare scarce show his head on the
    Rialto; a beggar, that was used to come so smug upon
    the mart; let him look to his bond: he was wont to
    call me usurer; let him look to his bond: he was
    wont to lend money for a Christian courtesy; let him
    look to his bond.

34 III / 1
  • To bait fish withal: if it will feed nothing else, it will
    feed my revenge....
  • To bait fish withal: if it will feed nothing else, it will
    feed my revenge. He hath disgraced me, and hindered me half a million;
    laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted
    my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies; and what's his
    reason? - I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs,
    dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt
    with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same
    means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a
    Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us,
    do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall
    we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in
    that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a
    Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by Christian
    example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach me, I will execute, and it
    shall go hard but I will better the instruction.
  • Salarino. Why, I am sure, if he forfeit, thou wilt not take
    his flesh: what's that good for?

    Shylock. To bait fish withal: if it will feed nothing else, it will
    feed my revenge. He hath disgraced me, and hindered me half a million;
    laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted
    my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies; and what's his
    reason? - I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs,
    dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt
    with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same
    means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer as a
    Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us,
    do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall
    we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in
    that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a
    Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by Christian
    example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach me, I will execute, and it
    shall go hard but I will better the instruction.

35 III / 1
  • How now, Tubal! what news from Genoa? hast thou
    found my daughter?
  • How now, Tubal! what news from Genoa? hast thou
    found my daughter?
  • Salanio. Here comes another of the tribe: a third cannot be
    matched, unless the devil himself turn Jew.

    Shylock. How now, Tubal! what news from Genoa? hast thou
    found my daughter?

36 III / 1
  • Why, there, there, there, there! a diamond gone,
    cost me two thousand ducats...
  • Why, there, there, there, there! a diamond gone,
    cost me two thousand ducats in Frankfort! The curse
    never fell upon our nation till now; I never felt it
    till now: two thousand ducats in that; and other
    precious, precious jewels. I would my daughter
    were dead at my foot, and the jewels in her ear!
    would she were hearsed at my foot, and the ducats in
    her coffin! No news of them? Why, so: and I know
    not what's spent in the search: why, thou loss upon
    loss! the thief gone with so much, and so much to
    find the thief; and no satisfaction, no revenge:
    nor no in luck stirring but what lights on my
    shoulders; no sighs but of my breathing; no tears
    but of my shedding.
  • Tubal. I often came where I did hear of her, but cannot find her.

    Shylock. Why, there, there, there, there! a diamond gone,
    cost me two thousand ducats in Frankfort! The curse
    never fell upon our nation till now; I never felt it
    till now: two thousand ducats in that; and other
    precious, precious jewels. I would my daughter
    were dead at my foot, and the jewels in her ear!
    would she were hearsed at my foot, and the ducats in
    her coffin! No news of them? Why, so: and I know
    not what's spent in the search: why, thou loss upon
    loss! the thief gone with so much, and so much to
    find the thief; and no satisfaction, no revenge:
    nor no in luck stirring but what lights on my
    shoulders; no sighs but of my breathing; no tears
    but of my shedding.

37 III / 1
  • What, what, what? ill luck, ill luck?
  • What, what, what? ill luck, ill luck?
  • Tubal. Yes, other men have ill luck too: Antonio, as I
    heard in Genoa,--

    Shylock. What, what, what? ill luck, ill luck?

38 III / 1
  • I thank God, I thank God. Is't true, is't true?
  • I thank God, I thank God. Is't true, is't true?
  • Tubal. Hath an argosy cast away, coming from Tripolis.

    Shylock. I thank God, I thank God. Is't true, is't true?

39 III / 1
  • I thank thee, good Tubal: good news, good news!
    ha, ha! where? in Genoa?
  • I thank thee, good Tubal: good news, good news!
    ha, ha! where? in Genoa?
  • Tubal. I spoke with some of the sailors that escaped the wreck.

    Shylock. I thank thee, good Tubal: good news, good news!
    ha, ha! where? in Genoa?

40 III / 1
  • Thou stickest a dagger in me: I shall never see my
    gold again: fourscore duc...
  • Thou stickest a dagger in me: I shall never see my
    gold again: fourscore ducats at a sitting!
    fourscore ducats!
  • Tubal. Your daughter spent in Genoa, as I heard, in one
    night fourscore ducats.

    Shylock. Thou stickest a dagger in me: I shall never see my
    gold again: fourscore ducats at a sitting!
    fourscore ducats!

41 III / 1
  • I am very glad of it: I'll plague him; I'll torture
    him: I am glad of it.
  • I am very glad of it: I'll plague him; I'll torture
    him: I am glad of it.
  • Tubal. There came divers of Antonio's creditors in my
    company to Venice, that swear he cannot choose but break.

    Shylock. I am very glad of it: I'll plague him; I'll torture
    him: I am glad of it.

42 III / 1
  • Out upon her! Thou torturest me, Tubal: it was my
    turquoise; I had it of Lea...
  • Out upon her! Thou torturest me, Tubal: it was my
    turquoise; I had it of Leah when I was a bachelor:
    I would not have given it for a wilderness of monkeys.
  • Tubal. One of them showed me a ring that he had of your
    daughter for a monkey.

    Shylock. Out upon her! Thou torturest me, Tubal: it was my
    turquoise; I had it of Leah when I was a bachelor:
    I would not have given it for a wilderness of monkeys.

43 III / 1
  • Nay, that's true, that's very true. Go, Tubal, fee
    me an officer; bespeak hi...
  • Nay, that's true, that's very true. Go, Tubal, fee
    me an officer; bespeak him a fortnight before. I
    will have the heart of him, if he forfeit; for, were
    he out of Venice, I can make what merchandise I
    will. Go, go, Tubal, and meet me at our synagogue;
    go, good Tubal; at our synagogue, Tubal.
  • Tubal. But Antonio is certainly undone.

    Shylock. Nay, that's true, that's very true. Go, Tubal, fee
    me an officer; bespeak him a fortnight before. I
    will have the heart of him, if he forfeit; for, were
    he out of Venice, I can make what merchandise I
    will. Go, go, Tubal, and meet me at our synagogue;
    go, good Tubal; at our synagogue, Tubal.

44 III / 3
  • Gaoler, look to him: tell not me of mercy;
    This is the fool that lent out mo...
  • Gaoler, look to him: tell not me of mercy;
    This is the fool that lent out money gratis:
    Gaoler, look to him.
  • Bassanio. Since I have your good leave to go away,
    I will make haste: but, till I come again,
    No bed shall e'er be guilty of my stay,
    No rest be interposer 'twixt us twain.

    Shylock. Gaoler, look to him: tell not me of mercy;
    This is the fool that lent out money gratis:
    Gaoler, look to him.

45 III / 3
  • I'll have my bond; speak not against my bond:
    I have sworn an oath that I wi...
  • I'll have my bond; speak not against my bond:
    I have sworn an oath that I will have my bond.
    Thou call'dst me dog before thou hadst a cause;
    But, since I am a dog, beware my fangs:
    The duke shall grant me justice. I do wonder,
    Thou naughty gaoler, that thou art so fond
    To come abroad with him at his request.
  • Antonio. Hear me yet, good Shylock.

    Shylock. I'll have my bond; speak not against my bond:
    I have sworn an oath that I will have my bond.
    Thou call'dst me dog before thou hadst a cause;
    But, since I am a dog, beware my fangs:
    The duke shall grant me justice. I do wonder,
    Thou naughty gaoler, that thou art so fond
    To come abroad with him at his request.

46 III / 3
  • I'll have my bond; I will not hear thee speak:
    I'll have my bond; and theref...
  • I'll have my bond; I will not hear thee speak:
    I'll have my bond; and therefore speak no more.
    I'll not be made a soft and dull-eyed fool,
    To shake the head, relent, and sigh, and yield
    To Christian intercessors. Follow not;
    I'll have no speaking: I will have my bond.
  • Antonio. I pray thee, hear me speak.

    Shylock. I'll have my bond; I will not hear thee speak:
    I'll have my bond; and therefore speak no more.
    I'll not be made a soft and dull-eyed fool,
    To shake the head, relent, and sigh, and yield
    To Christian intercessors. Follow not;
    I'll have no speaking: I will have my bond.

47 IV / 1
  • I have possess'd your grace of what I purpose;
    And by our holy Sabbath have...
  • I have possess'd your grace of what I purpose;
    And by our holy Sabbath have I sworn
    To have the due and forfeit of my bond:
    If you deny it, let the danger light
    Upon your charter and your city's freedom.
    You'll ask me, why I rather choose to have
    A weight of carrion flesh than to receive
    Three thousand ducats: I'll not answer that:
    But, say, it is my humour: is it answer'd?
    What if my house be troubled with a rat
    And I be pleased to give ten thousand ducats
    To have it baned? What, are you answer'd yet?
    Some men there are love not a gaping pig;
    Some, that are mad if they behold a cat;
    And others, when the bagpipe sings i' the nose,
    Cannot contain their urine: for affection,
    Mistress of passion, sways it to the mood
    Of what it likes or loathes. Now, for your answer:
    As there is no firm reason to be render'd,
    Why he cannot abide a gaping pig;
    Why he, a harmless necessary cat;
    Why he, a woollen bagpipe; but of force
    Must yield to such inevitable shame
    As to offend, himself being offended;
    So can I give no reason, nor I will not,
    More than a lodged hate and a certain loathing
    I bear Antonio, that I follow thus
    A losing suit against him. Are you answer'd?
  • Duke. Make room, and let him stand before our face.
    Shylock, the world thinks, and I think so too,
    That thou but lead'st this fashion of thy malice
    To the last hour of act; and then 'tis thought
    Thou'lt show thy mercy and remorse more strange
    Than is thy strange apparent cruelty;
    And where thou now exact'st the penalty,
    Which is a pound of this poor merchant's flesh,
    Thou wilt not only loose the forfeiture,
    But, touch'd with human gentleness and love,
    Forgive a moiety of the principal;
    Glancing an eye of pity on his losses,
    That have of late so huddled on his back,
    Enow to press a royal merchant down
    And pluck commiseration of his state
    From brassy bosoms and rough hearts of flint,
    From stubborn Turks and Tartars, never train'd
    To offices of tender courtesy.
    We all expect a gentle answer, Jew.

    Shylock. I have possess'd your grace of what I purpose;
    And by our holy Sabbath have I sworn
    To have the due and forfeit of my bond:
    If you deny it, let the danger light
    Upon your charter and your city's freedom.
    You'll ask me, why I rather choose to have
    A weight of carrion flesh than to receive
    Three thousand ducats: I'll not answer that:
    But, say, it is my humour: is it answer'd?
    What if my house be troubled with a rat
    And I be pleased to give ten thousand ducats
    To have it baned? What, are you answer'd yet?
    Some men there are love not a gaping pig;
    Some, that are mad if they behold a cat;
    And others, when the bagpipe sings i' the nose,
    Cannot contain their urine: for affection,
    Mistress of passion, sways it to the mood
    Of what it likes or loathes. Now, for your answer:
    As there is no firm reason to be render'd,
    Why he cannot abide a gaping pig;
    Why he, a harmless necessary cat;
    Why he, a woollen bagpipe; but of force
    Must yield to such inevitable shame
    As to offend, himself being offended;
    So can I give no reason, nor I will not,
    More than a lodged hate and a certain loathing
    I bear Antonio, that I follow thus
    A losing suit against him. Are you answer'd?

48 IV / 1
  • I am not bound to please thee with my answers.
  • I am not bound to please thee with my answers.
  • Bassanio. This is no answer, thou unfeeling man,
    To excuse the current of thy cruelty.

    Shylock. I am not bound to please thee with my answers.

49 IV / 1
  • Hates any man the thing he would not kill?
  • Hates any man the thing he would not kill?
  • Bassanio. Do all men kill the things they do not love?

    Shylock. Hates any man the thing he would not kill?

50 IV / 1
  • What, wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?
  • What, wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?
  • Bassanio. Every offence is not a hate at first.

    Shylock. What, wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice?

51 IV / 1
  • What judgment shall I dread, doing
    Were in six parts and every part a ducat,...
  • What judgment shall I dread, doing
    Were in six parts and every part a ducat,
    I would not draw them; I would have my bond.
  • Bassanio. For thy three thousand ducats here is six.

    Shylock. What judgment shall I dread, doing
    Were in six parts and every part a ducat,
    I would not draw them; I would have my bond.

52 IV / 1
  • What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong?
    You have among you many a purch...
  • What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong?
    You have among you many a purchased slave,
    Which, like your asses and your dogs and mules,
    You use in abject and in slavish parts,
    Because you bought them: shall I say to you,
    Let them be free, marry them to your heirs?
    Why sweat they under burthens? let their beds
    Be made as soft as yours and let their palates
    Be season'd with such viands? You will answer
    'The slaves are ours:' so do I answer you:
    The pound of flesh, which I demand of him,
    Is dearly bought; 'tis mine and I will have it.
    If you deny me, fie upon your law!
    There is no force in the decrees of Venice.
    I stand for judgment: answer; shall I have it?
  • Duke. How shalt thou hope for mercy, rendering none?

    Shylock. What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong?
    You have among you many a purchased slave,
    Which, like your asses and your dogs and mules,
    You use in abject and in slavish parts,
    Because you bought them: shall I say to you,
    Let them be free, marry them to your heirs?
    Why sweat they under burthens? let their beds
    Be made as soft as yours and let their palates
    Be season'd with such viands? You will answer
    'The slaves are ours:' so do I answer you:
    The pound of flesh, which I demand of him,
    Is dearly bought; 'tis mine and I will have it.
    If you deny me, fie upon your law!
    There is no force in the decrees of Venice.
    I stand for judgment: answer; shall I have it?

53 IV / 1
  • To cut the forfeiture from that bankrupt there.
  • To cut the forfeiture from that bankrupt there.
  • Bassanio. Why dost thou whet thy knife so earnestly?

    Shylock. To cut the forfeiture from that bankrupt there.

54 IV / 1
  • No, none that thou hast wit enough to make.
  • No, none that thou hast wit enough to make.
  • Gratiano. Not on thy sole, but on thy soul, harsh Jew,
    Thou makest thy knife keen; but no metal can,
    No, not the hangman's axe, bear half the keenness
    Of thy sharp envy. Can no prayers pierce thee?

    Shylock. No, none that thou hast wit enough to make.

55 IV / 1
  • Till thou canst rail the seal from off my bond,
    Thou but offend'st thy lungs...
  • Till thou canst rail the seal from off my bond,
    Thou but offend'st thy lungs to speak so loud:
    Repair thy wit, good youth, or it will fall
    To cureless ruin. I stand here for law.
  • Gratiano. O, be thou damn'd, inexecrable dog!
    And for thy life let justice be accused.
    Thou almost makest me waver in my faith
    To hold opinion with Pythagoras,
    That souls of animals infuse themselves
    Into the trunks of men: thy currish spirit
    Govern'd a wolf, who, hang'd for human slaughter,
    Even from the gallows did his fell soul fleet,
    And, whilst thou lay'st in thy unhallow'd dam,
    Infused itself in thee; for thy desires
    Are wolvish, bloody, starved and ravenous.

    Shylock. Till thou canst rail the seal from off my bond,
    Thou but offend'st thy lungs to speak so loud:
    Repair thy wit, good youth, or it will fall
    To cureless ruin. I stand here for law.

56 IV / 1
  • Shylock is my name.
  • Shylock is my name.
  • Portia. Is your name Shylock?

    Shylock. Shylock is my name.

57 IV / 1
  • On what compulsion must I? tell me that.
  • On what compulsion must I? tell me that.
  • Portia. Then must the Jew be merciful.

    Shylock. On what compulsion must I? tell me that.

58 IV / 1
  • My deeds upon my head! I crave the law,
    The penalty and forfeit of my bond.
  • My deeds upon my head! I crave the law,
    The penalty and forfeit of my bond.
  • Portia. The quality of mercy is not strain'd,
    It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
    Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest;
    It blesseth him that gives and him that takes:
    'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes
    The throned monarch better than his crown;
    His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
    The attribute to awe and majesty,
    Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
    But mercy is above this sceptred sway;
    It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,
    It is an attribute to God himself;
    And earthly power doth then show likest God's
    When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew,
    Though justice be thy plea, consider this,
    That, in the course of justice, none of us
    Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy;
    And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
    The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much
    To mitigate the justice of thy plea;
    Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice
    Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there.

    Shylock. My deeds upon my head! I crave the law,
    The penalty and forfeit of my bond.

59 IV / 1
  • A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!
    O wise young judge, how I do honou...
  • A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!
    O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!
  • Portia. It must not be; there is no power in Venice
    Can alter a decree established:
    'Twill be recorded for a precedent,
    And many an error by the same example
    Will rush into the state: it cannot be.

    Shylock. A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!
    O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!

60 IV / 1
  • Here 'tis, most reverend doctor, here it is.
  • Here 'tis, most reverend doctor, here it is.
  • Portia. I pray you, let me look upon the bond.

    Shylock. Here 'tis, most reverend doctor, here it is.

61 IV / 1
  • An oath, an oath, I have an oath in heaven:
    Shall I lay perjury upon my soul...
  • An oath, an oath, I have an oath in heaven:
    Shall I lay perjury upon my soul?
    No, not for Venice.
  • Portia. Shylock, there's thrice thy money offer'd thee.

    Shylock. An oath, an oath, I have an oath in heaven:
    Shall I lay perjury upon my soul?
    No, not for Venice.

62 IV / 1
  • When it is paid according to the tenor.
    It doth appear you are a worthy judg...
  • When it is paid according to the tenor.
    It doth appear you are a worthy judge;
    You know the law, your exposition
    Hath been most sound: I charge you by the law,
    Whereof you are a well-deserving pillar,
    Proceed to judgment: by my soul I swear
    There is no power in the tongue of man
    To alter me: I stay here on my bond.
  • Portia. Why, this bond is forfeit;
    And lawfully by this the Jew may claim
    A pound of flesh, to be by him cut off
    Nearest the merchant's heart. Be merciful:
    Take thrice thy money; bid me tear the bond.

    Shylock. When it is paid according to the tenor.
    It doth appear you are a worthy judge;
    You know the law, your exposition
    Hath been most sound: I charge you by the law,
    Whereof you are a well-deserving pillar,
    Proceed to judgment: by my soul I swear
    There is no power in the tongue of man
    To alter me: I stay here on my bond.

63 IV / 1
  • O noble judge! O excellent young man!
  • O noble judge! O excellent young man!
  • Portia. Why then, thus it is:
    You must prepare your bosom for his knife.

    Shylock. O noble judge! O excellent young man!

64 IV / 1
  • 'Tis very true: O wise and upright judge!
    How much more elder art thou than...
  • 'Tis very true: O wise and upright judge!
    How much more elder art thou than thy looks!
  • Portia. For the intent and purpose of the law
    Hath full relation to the penalty,
    Which here appeareth due upon the bond.

    Shylock. 'Tis very true: O wise and upright judge!
    How much more elder art thou than thy looks!

65 IV / 1
  • Ay, his breast:
    So says the bond: doth it not, noble judge?
    'Nearest his...
  • Ay, his breast:
    So says the bond: doth it not, noble judge?
    'Nearest his heart:' those are the very words.
  • Portia. Therefore lay bare your bosom.

    Shylock. Ay, his breast:
    So says the bond: doth it not, noble judge?
    'Nearest his heart:' those are the very words.

66 IV / 1
  • I have them ready.
  • I have them ready.
  • Portia. It is so. Are there balance here to weigh
    The flesh?

    Shylock. I have them ready.

67 IV / 1
  • Is it so nominated in the bond?
  • Is it so nominated in the bond?
  • Portia. Have by some surgeon, Shylock, on your charge,
    To stop his wounds, lest he do bleed to death.

    Shylock. Is it so nominated in the bond?

68 IV / 1
  • I cannot find it; 'tis not in the bond.
  • I cannot find it; 'tis not in the bond.
  • Portia. It is not so express'd: but what of that?
    'Twere good you do so much for charity.

    Shylock. I cannot find it; 'tis not in the bond.

69 IV / 1
  • These be the Christian husbands. I have a daughter;
    Would any of the stock o...
  • These be the Christian husbands. I have a daughter;
    Would any of the stock of Barrabas
    Had been her husband rather than a Christian!
    [Aside]
    We trifle time: I pray thee, pursue sentence.
  • Nerissa. 'Tis well you offer it behind her back;
    The wish would make else an unquiet house.

    Shylock. These be the Christian husbands. I have a daughter;
    Would any of the stock of Barrabas
    Had been her husband rather than a Christian!
    [Aside]
    We trifle time: I pray thee, pursue sentence.

70 IV / 1
  • Most rightful judge!
  • Most rightful judge!
  • Portia. A pound of that same merchant's flesh is thine:
    The court awards it, and the law doth give it.

    Shylock. Most rightful judge!

71 IV / 1
  • Most learned judge! A sentence! Come, prepare!
  • Most learned judge! A sentence! Come, prepare!
  • Portia. And you must cut this flesh from off his breast:
    The law allows it, and the court awards it.

    Shylock. Most learned judge! A sentence! Come, prepare!

72 IV / 1
  • Is that the law?
  • Is that the law?
  • Gratiano. O upright judge! Mark, Jew: O learned judge!

    Shylock. Is that the law?

73 IV / 1
  • I take this offer, then; pay the bond thrice
    And let the Christian go.
  • I take this offer, then; pay the bond thrice
    And let the Christian go.
  • Gratiano. O learned judge! Mark, Jew: a learned judge!

    Shylock. I take this offer, then; pay the bond thrice
    And let the Christian go.

74 IV / 1
  • Give me my principal, and let me go.
  • Give me my principal, and let me go.
  • Portia. Why doth the Jew pause? take thy forfeiture.

    Shylock. Give me my principal, and let me go.

75 IV / 1
  • Shall I not have barely my principal?
  • Shall I not have barely my principal?
  • Gratiano. A Daniel, still say I, a second Daniel!
    I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word.

    Shylock. Shall I not have barely my principal?

76 IV / 1
  • Why, then the devil give him good of it!
    I'll stay no longer question.
  • Why, then the devil give him good of it!
    I'll stay no longer question.
  • Portia. Thou shalt have nothing but the forfeiture,
    To be so taken at thy peril, Jew.

    Shylock. Why, then the devil give him good of it!
    I'll stay no longer question.

77 IV / 1
  • Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that:
    You take my house when you do ta...
  • Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that:
    You take my house when you do take the prop
    That doth sustain my house; you take my life
    When you do take the means whereby I live.
  • Portia. Ay, for the state, not for Antonio.

    Shylock. Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that:
    You take my house when you do take the prop
    That doth sustain my house; you take my life
    When you do take the means whereby I live.

78 IV / 1
  • I am content.
  • I am content.
  • Portia. Art thou contented, Jew? what dost thou say?

    Shylock. I am content.

79 IV / 1
  • I pray you, give me leave to go from hence;
    I am not well: send the deed aft...
  • I pray you, give me leave to go from hence;
    I am not well: send the deed after me,
    And I will sign it.
  • Portia. Clerk, draw a deed of gift.

    Shylock. I pray you, give me leave to go from hence;
    I am not well: send the deed after me,
    And I will sign it.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.