Speeches (Lines) for Silence in "History of Henry IV, Part II"

Total: 22
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 III / 2
  • Good morrow, good cousin Shallow.
  • Good morrow, good cousin Shallow.
  • Robert Shallow. Come on, come on, come on; give me your hand, sir;
    your hand, sir. An early stirrer, by the rood! And how doth
    good cousin Silence?

    Silence. Good morrow, good cousin Shallow.

2 III / 2
  • Alas, a black ousel, cousin Shallow!
  • Alas, a black ousel, cousin Shallow!
  • Robert Shallow. And how doth my cousin, your bed-fellow? and your
    daughter and mine, my god-daughter Ellen?

    Silence. Alas, a black ousel, cousin Shallow!

3 III / 2
  • Indeed, sir, to my cost.
  • Indeed, sir, to my cost.
  • Robert Shallow. By yea and no, sir. I dare say my cousin William is
    a good scholar; he is at Oxford still, is he not?

    Silence. Indeed, sir, to my cost.

4 III / 2
  • You were call'd 'lusty Shallow' then, cousin.
  • You were call'd 'lusty Shallow' then, cousin.
  • Robert Shallow. 'A must, then, to the Inns o' Court shortly. I was
    Clement's Inn; where I think they will talk of mad Shallow

    Silence. You were call'd 'lusty Shallow' then, cousin.

5 III / 2
  • This Sir John, cousin, that comes hither anon about
    soldiers?
  • This Sir John, cousin, that comes hither anon about
    soldiers?
  • Robert Shallow. By the mass, I was call'd anything; and I would have
    anything indeed too, and roundly too. There was I, and little
    John Doit of Staffordshire, and black George Barnes, and
    Pickbone, and Will Squele a Cotsole man--you had not four
    swinge-bucklers in all the Inns of Court again. And I may say
    you we knew where the bona-robas were, and had the best of
    all at commandment. Then was Jack Falstaff, now Sir John,
    and page to Thomas Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk.

    Silence. This Sir John, cousin, that comes hither anon about
    soldiers?

6 III / 2
  • We shall all follow, cousin.
  • We shall all follow, cousin.
  • Robert Shallow. The same Sir John, the very same. I see him break
    Scoggin's head at the court gate, when 'a was a crack not
    high; and the very same day did I fight with one Sampson
    Stockfish, a fruiterer, behind Gray's Inn. Jesu, Jesu, the
    days that I have spent! and to see how many of my old
    acquaintance are dead!

    Silence. We shall all follow, cousin.

7 III / 2
  • By my troth, I was not there.
  • By my troth, I was not there.
  • Robert Shallow. Certain, 'tis certain; very sure, very sure. Death, as
    Psalmist saith, is certain to all; all shall die. How a good
    of bullocks at Stamford fair?

    Silence. By my troth, I was not there.

8 III / 2
  • Dead, sir.
  • Dead, sir.
  • Robert Shallow. Death is certain. Is old Double of your town living

    Silence. Dead, sir.

9 III / 2
  • Thereafter as they be--a score of good ewes may be
    ten pounds.
  • Thereafter as they be--a score of good ewes may be
    ten pounds.
  • Robert Shallow. Jesu, Jesu, dead! drew a good bow; and dead! 'A shot a
    fine shoot. John a Gaunt loved him well, and betted much
    his head. Dead! 'A would have clapp'd i' th' clout at twelve
    score, and carried you a forehand shaft a fourteen and
    and a half, that it would have done a man's heart good to
    How a score of ewes now?

    Silence. Thereafter as they be--a score of good ewes may be
    ten pounds.

10 III / 2
  • Here come two of Sir John Falstaffs men, as I think.
  • Here come two of Sir John Falstaffs men, as I think.
  • Robert Shallow. And is old Double dead?

    Silence. Here come two of Sir John Falstaffs men, as I think.

11 III / 2
  • Your good worship is welcome.
  • Your good worship is welcome.
  • Falstaff. Good Master Silence, it well befits you should be of
    peace.

    Silence. Your good worship is welcome.

12 III / 2
  • That's fifty-five year ago.
  • That's fifty-five year ago.
  • Robert Shallow. Nay, she must be old; she cannot choose but be old;
    certain she's old; and had Robin Nightwork, by old Nightwork,
    before I came to Clement's Inn.

    Silence. That's fifty-five year ago.

13 V / 3
  • Ah, sirrah! quoth-a--we shall [Singing]
    Do nothing but eat and make go...
  • Ah, sirrah! quoth-a--we shall [Singing]
    Do nothing but eat and make good cheer,
    And praise God for the merry year;
    When flesh is cheap and females dear,
    And lusty lads roam here and there,
    So merrily,
    And ever among so merrily.
  • Robert Shallow. A good varlet, a good varlet, a very good varlet, Sir
    John. By the mass, I have drunk too much sack at supper. A
    varlet. Now sit down, now sit down; come, cousin.

    Silence. Ah, sirrah! quoth-a--we shall [Singing]
    Do nothing but eat and make good cheer,
    And praise God for the merry year;
    When flesh is cheap and females dear,
    And lusty lads roam here and there,
    So merrily,
    And ever among so merrily.

14 V / 3
  • [Singing]
    Be merry, be merry, my wife has all;
    For women are shrews,...
  • [Singing]
    Be merry, be merry, my wife has all;
    For women are shrews, both short and tall;
    'Tis merry in hall when beards wag an;
    And welcome merry Shrove-tide.
    Be merry, be merry.
  • Robert Shallow. Be merry, Master Bardolph; and, my little soldier
    be merry.

    Silence. [Singing]
    Be merry, be merry, my wife has all;
    For women are shrews, both short and tall;
    'Tis merry in hall when beards wag an;
    And welcome merry Shrove-tide.
    Be merry, be merry.

15 V / 3
  • Who, I? I have been merry twice and once ere now.
  • Who, I? I have been merry twice and once ere now.
  • Falstaff. I did not think Master Silence had been a man of this
    mettle.

    Silence. Who, I? I have been merry twice and once ere now.

16 V / 3
  • [Singing]
    A cup of wine that's brisk and fine,
    And drink unto the le...
  • [Singing]
    A cup of wine that's brisk and fine,
    And drink unto the leman mine;
    And a merry heart lives long-a.
  • Davy. Your worship! I'll be with you straight. [To BARDOLPH]
    A cup of wine, sir?

    Silence. [Singing]
    A cup of wine that's brisk and fine,
    And drink unto the leman mine;
    And a merry heart lives long-a.

17 V / 3
  • An we shall be merry, now comes in the sweet o' th'
  • An we shall be merry, now comes in the sweet o' th'
  • Falstaff. Well said, Master Silence.

    Silence. An we shall be merry, now comes in the sweet o' th'

18 V / 3
  • [Singing]
    Fill the cup, and let it come,
    I'll pledge you a mile to t...
  • [Singing]
    Fill the cup, and let it come,
    I'll pledge you a mile to th' bottom.
  • Falstaff. Health and long life to you, Master Silence!

    Silence. [Singing]
    Fill the cup, and let it come,
    I'll pledge you a mile to th' bottom.

19 V / 3
  • [Singing]
    Do me right,
    And dub me knight.
    Samingo.
    Is't no...
  • [Singing]
    Do me right,
    And dub me knight.
    Samingo.
    Is't not so?
  • Falstaff. [To SILENCE, who has drunk a bumper] Why, now you
    done me right.

    Silence. [Singing]
    Do me right,
    And dub me knight.
    Samingo.
    Is't not so?

20 V / 3
  • Is't so? Why then, say an old man can do somewhat.
  • Is't so? Why then, say an old man can do somewhat.
  • Falstaff. 'Tis so.

    Silence. Is't so? Why then, say an old man can do somewhat.

21 V / 3
  • By'r lady, I think 'a be, but goodman Puff of Barson.
  • By'r lady, I think 'a be, but goodman Puff of Barson.
  • Pistol. Not the ill wind which blows no man to good. Sweet
    thou art now one of the greatest men in this realm.

    Silence. By'r lady, I think 'a be, but goodman Puff of Barson.

22 V / 3
  • [Singing] And Robin Hood, Scarlet, and John.
  • [Singing] And Robin Hood, Scarlet, and John.
  • Falstaff. O base Assyrian knight, what is thy news?
    Let King Cophetua know the truth thereof.

    Silence. [Singing] And Robin Hood, Scarlet, and John.

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