Speeches (Lines) for Silvius in "As You Like It"

Total: 24
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 4
  • O Corin, that thou knew'st how I do love her!
  • O Corin, that thou knew'st how I do love her!
  • Corin. That is the way to make her scorn you still.

    Silvius. O Corin, that thou knew'st how I do love her!

2 II / 4
  • No, Corin, being old, thou canst not guess,
    Though in thy youth thou wast as...
  • No, Corin, being old, thou canst not guess,
    Though in thy youth thou wast as true a lover
    As ever sigh'd upon a midnight pillow.
    But if thy love were ever like to mine,
    As sure I think did never man love so,
    How many actions most ridiculous
    Hast thou been drawn to by thy fantasy?
  • Corin. I partly guess; for I have lov'd ere now.

    Silvius. No, Corin, being old, thou canst not guess,
    Though in thy youth thou wast as true a lover
    As ever sigh'd upon a midnight pillow.
    But if thy love were ever like to mine,
    As sure I think did never man love so,
    How many actions most ridiculous
    Hast thou been drawn to by thy fantasy?

3 II / 4
  • O, thou didst then never love so heartily!
    If thou rememb'rest not the sligh...
  • O, thou didst then never love so heartily!
    If thou rememb'rest not the slightest folly
    That ever love did make thee run into,
    Thou hast not lov'd;
    Or if thou hast not sat as I do now,
    Wearing thy hearer in thy mistress' praise,
    Thou hast not lov'd;
    Or if thou hast not broke from company
    Abruptly, as my passion now makes me,
    Thou hast not lov'd.
    O Phebe, Phebe, Phebe! Exit Silvius
  • Corin. Into a thousand that I have forgotten.

    Silvius. O, thou didst then never love so heartily!
    If thou rememb'rest not the slightest folly
    That ever love did make thee run into,
    Thou hast not lov'd;
    Or if thou hast not sat as I do now,
    Wearing thy hearer in thy mistress' praise,
    Thou hast not lov'd;
    Or if thou hast not broke from company
    Abruptly, as my passion now makes me,
    Thou hast not lov'd.
    O Phebe, Phebe, Phebe! Exit Silvius

4 III / 5
  • Sweet Phebe, do not scorn me; do not, Phebe.
    Say that you love me not; but s...
  • Sweet Phebe, do not scorn me; do not, Phebe.
    Say that you love me not; but say not so
    In bitterness. The common executioner,
    Whose heart th' accustom'd sight of death makes hard,
    Falls not the axe upon the humbled neck
    But first begs pardon. Will you sterner be
    Than he that dies and lives by bloody drops?
  • Rosalind. O, come, let us remove!
    The sight of lovers feedeth those in love.
    Bring us to this sight, and you shall say
    I'll prove a busy actor in their play. Exeunt

    Silvius. Sweet Phebe, do not scorn me; do not, Phebe.
    Say that you love me not; but say not so
    In bitterness. The common executioner,
    Whose heart th' accustom'd sight of death makes hard,
    Falls not the axe upon the humbled neck
    But first begs pardon. Will you sterner be
    Than he that dies and lives by bloody drops?

5 III / 5
  • O dear Phebe,
    If ever- as that ever may be near-
    You meet in some fresh...
  • O dear Phebe,
    If ever- as that ever may be near-
    You meet in some fresh cheek the power of fancy,
    Then shall you know the wounds invisible
    That love's keen arrows make.
  • Phebe. I would not be thy executioner;
    I fly thee, for I would not injure thee.
    Thou tell'st me there is murder in mine eye.
    'Tis pretty, sure, and very probable,
    That eyes, that are the frail'st and softest things,
    Who shut their coward gates on atomies,
    Should be call'd tyrants, butchers, murderers!
    Now I do frown on thee with all my heart;
    And if mine eyes can wound, now let them kill thee.
    Now counterfeit to swoon; why, now fall down;
    Or, if thou canst not, O, for shame, for shame,
    Lie not, to say mine eyes are murderers.
    Now show the wound mine eye hath made in thee.
    Scratch thee but with a pin, and there remains
    Some scar of it; lean upon a rush,
    The cicatrice and capable impressure
    Thy palm some moment keeps; but now mine eyes,
    Which I have darted at thee, hurt thee not;
    Nor, I am sure, there is not force in eyes
    That can do hurt.

    Silvius. O dear Phebe,
    If ever- as that ever may be near-
    You meet in some fresh cheek the power of fancy,
    Then shall you know the wounds invisible
    That love's keen arrows make.

6 III / 5
  • Sweet Phebe.
  • Sweet Phebe.
  • Phebe. Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might:
    'Who ever lov'd that lov'd not at first sight?'

    Silvius. Sweet Phebe.

7 III / 5
  • Sweet Phebe, pity me.
  • Sweet Phebe, pity me.
  • Phebe. Ha! what say'st thou, Silvius?

    Silvius. Sweet Phebe, pity me.

8 III / 5
  • Wherever sorrow is, relief would be.
    If you do sorrow at my grief in love, <...
  • Wherever sorrow is, relief would be.
    If you do sorrow at my grief in love,
    By giving love, your sorrow and my grief
    Were both extermin'd.
  • Phebe. Why, I am sorry for thee, gentle Silvius.

    Silvius. Wherever sorrow is, relief would be.
    If you do sorrow at my grief in love,
    By giving love, your sorrow and my grief
    Were both extermin'd.

9 III / 5
  • I would have you.
  • I would have you.
  • Phebe. Thou hast my love; is not that neighbourly?

    Silvius. I would have you.

10 III / 5
  • So holy and so perfect is my love,
    And I in such a poverty of grace,
    Tha...
  • So holy and so perfect is my love,
    And I in such a poverty of grace,
    That I shall think it a most plenteous crop
    To glean the broken ears after the man
    That the main harvest reaps; loose now and then
    A scatt'red smile, and that I'll live upon.
  • Phebe. Why, that were covetousness.
    Silvius, the time was that I hated thee;
    And yet it is not that I bear thee love;
    But since that thou canst talk of love so well,
    Thy company, which erst was irksome to me,
    I will endure; and I'll employ thee too.
    But do not look for further recompense
    Than thine own gladness that thou art employ'd.

    Silvius. So holy and so perfect is my love,
    And I in such a poverty of grace,
    That I shall think it a most plenteous crop
    To glean the broken ears after the man
    That the main harvest reaps; loose now and then
    A scatt'red smile, and that I'll live upon.

11 III / 5
  • Not very well; but I have met him oft;
    And he hath bought the cottage and th...
  • Not very well; but I have met him oft;
    And he hath bought the cottage and the bounds
    That the old carlot once was master of.
  • Phebe. Know'st thou the youth that spoke to me erewhile?

    Silvius. Not very well; but I have met him oft;
    And he hath bought the cottage and the bounds
    That the old carlot once was master of.

12 III / 5
  • Phebe, with all my heart.
  • Phebe, with all my heart.
  • Phebe. Think not I love him, though I ask for him;
    'Tis but a peevish boy; yet he talks well.
    But what care I for words? Yet words do well
    When he that speaks them pleases those that hear.
    It is a pretty youth- not very pretty;
    But, sure, he's proud; and yet his pride becomes him.
    He'll make a proper man. The best thing in him
    Is his complexion; and faster than his tongue
    Did make offence, his eye did heal it up.
    He is not very tall; yet for his years he's tall;
    His leg is but so-so; and yet 'tis well.
    There was a pretty redness in his lip,
    A little riper and more lusty red
    Than that mix'd in his cheek; 'twas just the difference
    Betwixt the constant red and mingled damask.
    There be some women, Silvius, had they mark'd him
    In parcels as I did, would have gone near
    To fall in love with him; but, for my part,
    I love him not, nor hate him not; and yet
    I have more cause to hate him than to love him;
    For what had he to do to chide at me?
    He said mine eyes were black, and my hair black,
    And, now I am rememb'red, scorn'd at me.
    I marvel why I answer'd not again;
    But that's all one: omittance is no quittance.
    I'll write to him a very taunting letter,
    And thou shalt bear it; wilt thou, Silvius?

    Silvius. Phebe, with all my heart.

13 IV / 3
  • My errand is to you, fair youth;
    My gentle Phebe did bid me give you this. <...
  • My errand is to you, fair youth;
    My gentle Phebe did bid me give you this.
    I know not the contents; but, as I guess
    By the stern brow and waspish action
    Which she did use as she was writing of it,
    It bears an angry tenour. Pardon me,
    I am but as a guiltless messenger.
  • Celia. I warrant you, with pure love and troubled brain, he hath
    ta'en his bow and arrows, and is gone forth- to sleep. Look, who
    comes here.

    Silvius. My errand is to you, fair youth;
    My gentle Phebe did bid me give you this.
    I know not the contents; but, as I guess
    By the stern brow and waspish action
    Which she did use as she was writing of it,
    It bears an angry tenour. Pardon me,
    I am but as a guiltless messenger.

14 IV / 3
  • No, I protest, I know not the contents;
    Phebe did write it.
  • No, I protest, I know not the contents;
    Phebe did write it.
  • Rosalind. Patience herself would startle at this letter,
    And play the swaggerer. Bear this, bear all.
    She says I am not fair, that I lack manners;
    She calls me proud, and that she could not love me,
    Were man as rare as Phoenix. 'Od's my will!
    Her love is not the hare that I do hunt;
    Why writes she so to me? Well, shepherd, well,
    This is a letter of your own device.

    Silvius. No, I protest, I know not the contents;
    Phebe did write it.

15 IV / 3
  • Sure, it is hers.
  • Sure, it is hers.
  • Rosalind. Come, come, you are a fool,
    And turn'd into the extremity of love.
    I saw her hand; she has a leathern hand,
    A freestone-colour'd hand; I verily did think
    That her old gloves were on, but 'twas her hands;
    She has a huswife's hand- but that's no matter.
    I say she never did invent this letter:
    This is a man's invention, and his hand.

    Silvius. Sure, it is hers.

16 IV / 3
  • So please you, for I never heard it yet;
    Yet heard too much of Phebe's cruel...
  • So please you, for I never heard it yet;
    Yet heard too much of Phebe's cruelty.
  • Rosalind. Why, 'tis a boisterous and a cruel style;
    A style for challengers. Why, she defies me,
    Like Turk to Christian. Women's gentle brain
    Could not drop forth such giant-rude invention,
    Such Ethiope words, blacker in their effect
    Than in their countenance. Will you hear the letter?

    Silvius. So please you, for I never heard it yet;
    Yet heard too much of Phebe's cruelty.

17 IV / 3
  • Call you this railing?
  • Call you this railing?
  • Rosalind. She Phebes me: mark how the tyrant writes. [Reads]
    'Art thou god to shepherd turn'd,
    That a maiden's heart hath burn'd?'
    Can a woman rail thus?

    Silvius. Call you this railing?

18 IV / 3
  • Call you this chiding?
  • Call you this chiding?
  • Rosalind. 'Why, thy godhead laid apart,
    Warr'st thou with a woman's heart?'
    Did you ever hear such railing?
    'Whiles the eye of man did woo me,
    That could do no vengeance to me.'
    Meaning me a beast.
    'If the scorn of your bright eyne
    Have power to raise such love in mine,
    Alack, in me what strange effect
    Would they work in mild aspect!
    Whiles you chid me, I did love;
    How then might your prayers move!
    He that brings this love to the
    Little knows this love in me;
    And by him seal up thy mind,
    Whether that thy youth and kind
    Will the faithful offer take
    Of me and all that I can make;
    Or else by him my love deny,
    And then I'll study how to die.'

    Silvius. Call you this chiding?

19 V / 2
  • It is to be all made of sighs and tears;
    And so am I for Phebe.
  • It is to be all made of sighs and tears;
    And so am I for Phebe.
  • Phebe. Good shepherd, tell this youth what 'tis to love.

    Silvius. It is to be all made of sighs and tears;
    And so am I for Phebe.

20 V / 2
  • It is to be all made of faith and service;
    And so am I for Phebe.
  • It is to be all made of faith and service;
    And so am I for Phebe.
  • Rosalind. And I for no woman.

    Silvius. It is to be all made of faith and service;
    And so am I for Phebe.

21 V / 2
  • It is to be all made of fantasy,
    All made of passion, and all made of wishes...
  • It is to be all made of fantasy,
    All made of passion, and all made of wishes;
    All adoration, duty, and observance,
    All humbleness, all patience, and impatience,
    All purity, all trial, all obedience;
    And so am I for Phebe.
  • Rosalind. And I for no woman.

    Silvius. It is to be all made of fantasy,
    All made of passion, and all made of wishes;
    All adoration, duty, and observance,
    All humbleness, all patience, and impatience,
    All purity, all trial, all obedience;
    And so am I for Phebe.

22 V / 2
  • If this be so, why blame you me to love you?
  • If this be so, why blame you me to love you?
  • Phebe. If this be so, why blame you me to love you?

    Silvius. If this be so, why blame you me to love you?

23 V / 2
  • I'll not fail, if I live.
  • I'll not fail, if I live.
  • Rosalind. Pray you, no more of this; 'tis like the howling of Irish
    wolves against the moon. [To SILVIUS] I will help you if I can.
    [To PHEBE] I would love you if I could.- To-morrow meet me all
    together. [ To PHEBE ] I will marry you if ever I marry woman,
    and I'll be married to-morrow. [To ORLANDO] I will satisfy you if
    ever I satisfied man, and you shall be married to-morrow. [To
    Silvius] I will content you if what pleases you contents you, and
    you shall be married to-morrow. [To ORLANDO] As you love
    Rosalind, meet. [To SILVIUS] As you love Phebe, meet;- and as I
    love no woman, I'll meet. So, fare you well; I have left you
    commands.

    Silvius. I'll not fail, if I live.

24 V / 4
  • Though to have her and death were both one thing.
  • Though to have her and death were both one thing.
  • Rosalind. You say that you'll have Phebe, if she will?

    Silvius. Though to have her and death were both one thing.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.