Speeches (Lines) for Simple in "The Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 25
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Book of Riddles! why, did you not lend it to Alice
    Shortcake upon All-hallow...
  • Book of Riddles! why, did you not lend it to Alice
    Shortcake upon All-hallowmas last, a fortnight
    afore Michaelmas?
  • Slender. I had rather than forty shillings I had my Book of
    Songs and Sonnets here.
    [Enter SIMPLE]
    How now, Simple! where have you been? I must wait
    on myself, must I? You have not the Book of Riddles
    about you, have you?

    Simple. Book of Riddles! why, did you not lend it to Alice
    Shortcake upon All-hallowmas last, a fortnight
    afore Michaelmas?

2 I / 2
  • Well, sir.
  • Well, sir.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. Go your ways, and ask of Doctor Caius' house which
    is the way: and there dwells one Mistress Quickly,
    which is in the manner of his nurse, or his dry
    nurse, or his cook, or his laundry, his washer, and
    his wringer.

    Simple. Well, sir.

3 I / 4
  • Ay, for fault of a better.
  • Ay, for fault of a better.
  • Hostess Quickly. Go; and we'll have a posset for't soon at night, in
    faith, at the latter end of a sea-coal fire.
    [Exit RUGBY]
    An honest, willing, kind fellow, as ever servant
    shall come in house withal, and, I warrant you, no
    tell-tale nor no breed-bate: his worst fault is,
    that he is given to prayer; he is something peevish
    that way: but nobody but has his fault; but let
    that pass. Peter Simple, you say your name is?

    Simple. Ay, for fault of a better.

4 I / 4
  • Ay, forsooth.
  • Ay, forsooth.
  • Hostess Quickly. And Master Slender's your master?

    Simple. Ay, forsooth.

5 I / 4
  • No, forsooth: he hath but a little wee face, with a
    little yellow beard, a C...
  • No, forsooth: he hath but a little wee face, with a
    little yellow beard, a Cain-coloured beard.
  • Hostess Quickly. Does he not wear a great round beard, like a
    glover's paring-knife?

    Simple. No, forsooth: he hath but a little wee face, with a
    little yellow beard, a Cain-coloured beard.

6 I / 4
  • Ay, forsooth: but he is as tall a man of his hands
    as any is between this an...
  • Ay, forsooth: but he is as tall a man of his hands
    as any is between this and his head; he hath fought
    with a warrener.
  • Hostess Quickly. A softly-sprighted man, is he not?

    Simple. Ay, forsooth: but he is as tall a man of his hands
    as any is between this and his head; he hath fought
    with a warrener.

7 I / 4
  • Yes, indeed, does he.
  • Yes, indeed, does he.
  • Hostess Quickly. How say you? O, I should remember him: does he not
    hold up his head, as it were, and strut in his gait?

    Simple. Yes, indeed, does he.

8 I / 4
  • Ay, forsooth; to desire her to--
  • Ay, forsooth; to desire her to--
  • Doctor Caius. Vell.

    Simple. Ay, forsooth; to desire her to--

9 I / 4
  • To desire this honest gentlewoman, your maid, to
    speak a good word to Mistre...
  • To desire this honest gentlewoman, your maid, to
    speak a good word to Mistress Anne Page for my
    master in the way of marriage.
  • Doctor Caius. Peace-a your tongue. Speak-a your tale.

    Simple. To desire this honest gentlewoman, your maid, to
    speak a good word to Mistress Anne Page for my
    master in the way of marriage.

10 I / 4
  • [Aside to MISTRESS QUICKLY] 'Tis a great charge to
    come under one body's han...
  • [Aside to MISTRESS QUICKLY] 'Tis a great charge to
    come under one body's hand.
  • Hostess Quickly. [Aside to SIMPLE] I am glad he is so quiet: if he
    had been thoroughly moved, you should have heard him
    so loud and so melancholy. But notwithstanding,
    man, I'll do you your master what good I can: and
    the very yea and the no is, the French doctor, my
    master,--I may call him my master, look you, for I
    keep his house; and I wash, wring, brew, bake,
    scour, dress meat and drink, make the beds and do
    all myself,--

    Simple. [Aside to MISTRESS QUICKLY] 'Tis a great charge to
    come under one body's hand.

11 III / 1
  • Marry, sir, the pittie-ward, the park-ward, every
    way; old Windsor way, and...
  • Marry, sir, the pittie-ward, the park-ward, every
    way; old Windsor way, and every way but the town
    way.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. I pray you now, good master Slender's serving-man,
    and friend Simple by your name, which way have you
    looked for Master Caius, that calls himself doctor of physic?

    Simple. Marry, sir, the pittie-ward, the park-ward, every
    way; old Windsor way, and every way but the town
    way.

12 III / 1
  • I will, sir.
  • I will, sir.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. I most fehemently desire you you will also look that
    way.

    Simple. I will, sir.

13 III / 1
  • Yonder he is coming, this way, Sir Hugh.
  • Yonder he is coming, this way, Sir Hugh.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. 'Pless my soul, how full of chollors I am, and
    trempling of mind! I shall be glad if he have
    deceived me. How melancholies I am! I will knog
    his urinals about his knave's costard when I have
    good opportunities for the ork. 'Pless my soul!
    [Sings]
    To shallow rivers, to whose falls
    Melodious birds sings madrigals;
    There will we make our peds of roses,
    And a thousand fragrant posies.
    To shallow--
    Mercy on me! I have a great dispositions to cry.
    [Sings]
    Melodious birds sing madrigals--
    When as I sat in Pabylon--
    And a thousand vagram posies.
    To shallow &c.

    Simple. Yonder he is coming, this way, Sir Hugh.

14 III / 1
  • No weapons, sir. There comes my master, Master
    Shallow, and another gentlema...
  • No weapons, sir. There comes my master, Master
    Shallow, and another gentleman, from Frogmore, over
    the stile, this way.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. He's welcome.
    [Sings]
    To shallow rivers, to whose falls-
    Heaven prosper the right! What weapons is he?

    Simple. No weapons, sir. There comes my master, Master
    Shallow, and another gentleman, from Frogmore, over
    the stile, this way.

15 IV / 5
  • Marry, sir, I come to speak with Sir John Falstaff
    from Master Slender.
  • Marry, sir, I come to speak with Sir John Falstaff
    from Master Slender.
  • Host. What wouldst thou have, boor? what: thick-skin?
    speak, breathe, discuss; brief, short, quick, snap.

    Simple. Marry, sir, I come to speak with Sir John Falstaff
    from Master Slender.

16 IV / 5
  • There's an old woman, a fat woman, gone up into his
    chamber: I'll be so bold...
  • There's an old woman, a fat woman, gone up into his
    chamber: I'll be so bold as stay, sir, till she come
    down; I come to speak with her, indeed.
  • Host. There's his chamber, his house, his castle, his
    standing-bed and truckle-bed; 'tis painted about
    with the story of the Prodigal, fresh and new. Go
    knock and call; hell speak like an Anthropophaginian
    unto thee: knock, I say.

    Simple. There's an old woman, a fat woman, gone up into his
    chamber: I'll be so bold as stay, sir, till she come
    down; I come to speak with her, indeed.

17 IV / 5
  • Pray you, sir, was't not the wise woman of
    Brentford?
  • Pray you, sir, was't not the wise woman of
    Brentford?
  • Falstaff. There was, mine host, an old fat woman even now with
    me; but she's gone.

    Simple. Pray you, sir, was't not the wise woman of
    Brentford?

18 IV / 5
  • My master, sir, Master Slender, sent to her, seeing
    her go through the stree...
  • My master, sir, Master Slender, sent to her, seeing
    her go through the streets, to know, sir, whether
    one Nym, sir, that beguiled him of a chain, had the
    chain or no.
  • Falstaff. Ay, marry, was it, mussel-shell: what would you with her?

    Simple. My master, sir, Master Slender, sent to her, seeing
    her go through the streets, to know, sir, whether
    one Nym, sir, that beguiled him of a chain, had the
    chain or no.

19 IV / 5
  • And what says she, I pray, sir?
  • And what says she, I pray, sir?
  • Falstaff. I spake with the old woman about it.

    Simple. And what says she, I pray, sir?

20 IV / 5
  • I would I could have spoken with the woman herself;
    I had other things to ha...
  • I would I could have spoken with the woman herself;
    I had other things to have spoken with her too from
    him.
  • Falstaff. Marry, she says that the very same man that
    beguiled Master Slender of his chain cozened him of
    it.

    Simple. I would I could have spoken with the woman herself;
    I had other things to have spoken with her too from
    him.

21 IV / 5
  • I may not conceal them, sir.
  • I may not conceal them, sir.
  • Host. Ay, come; quick.

    Simple. I may not conceal them, sir.

22 IV / 5
  • Why, sir, they were nothing but about Mistress Anne
    Page; to know if it were...
  • Why, sir, they were nothing but about Mistress Anne
    Page; to know if it were my master's fortune to
    have her or no.
  • Host. Conceal them, or thou diest.

    Simple. Why, sir, they were nothing but about Mistress Anne
    Page; to know if it were my master's fortune to
    have her or no.

23 IV / 5
  • What, sir?
  • What, sir?
  • Falstaff. 'Tis, 'tis his fortune.

    Simple. What, sir?

24 IV / 5
  • May I be bold to say so, sir?
  • May I be bold to say so, sir?
  • Falstaff. To have her, or no. Go; say the woman told me so.

    Simple. May I be bold to say so, sir?

25 IV / 5
  • I thank your worship: I shall make my master glad
    with these tidings.
  • I thank your worship: I shall make my master glad
    with these tidings.
  • Falstaff. Ay, sir; like who more bold.

    Simple. I thank your worship: I shall make my master glad
    with these tidings.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.