Speeches (Lines) for Siward in "The Tragedy of Macbeth"

Total: 11
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 V / 4
  • What wood is this before us?
  • What wood is this before us?
  • Menteith. We doubt it nothing.

    Siward. What wood is this before us?

2 V / 4
  • We learn no other but the confident tyrant
    Keeps still in Dunsinane, and wil...
  • We learn no other but the confident tyrant
    Keeps still in Dunsinane, and will endure
    Our setting down before 't.
  • Soldiers. It shall be done.

    Siward. We learn no other but the confident tyrant
    Keeps still in Dunsinane, and will endure
    Our setting down before 't.

3 V / 4
  • The time approaches
    That will with due decision make us know
    What we sha...
  • The time approaches
    That will with due decision make us know
    What we shall say we have and what we owe.
    Thoughts speculative their unsure hopes relate,
    But certain issue strokes must arbitrate:
    Towards which advance the war.
  • Macduff. Let our just censures
    Attend the true event, and put we on
    Industrious soldiership.

    Siward. The time approaches
    That will with due decision make us know
    What we shall say we have and what we owe.
    Thoughts speculative their unsure hopes relate,
    But certain issue strokes must arbitrate:
    Towards which advance the war.

4 V / 6
  • Fare you well.
    Do we but find the tyrant's power to-night,
    Let us be bea...
  • Fare you well.
    Do we but find the tyrant's power to-night,
    Let us be beaten, if we cannot fight.
  • Malcolm. Now near enough: your leafy screens throw down.
    And show like those you are. You, worthy uncle,
    Shall, with my cousin, your right-noble son,
    Lead our first battle: worthy Macduff and we
    Shall take upon 's what else remains to do,
    According to our order.

    Siward. Fare you well.
    Do we but find the tyrant's power to-night,
    Let us be beaten, if we cannot fight.

5 V / 7
  • This way, my lord; the castle's gently render'd:
    The tyrant's people on both...
  • This way, my lord; the castle's gently render'd:
    The tyrant's people on both sides do fight;
    The noble thanes do bravely in the war;
    The day almost itself professes yours,
    And little is to do.
  • Macduff. That way the noise is. Tyrant, show thy face!
    If thou be'st slain and with no stroke of mine,
    My wife and children's ghosts will haunt me still.
    I cannot strike at wretched kerns, whose arms
    Are hired to bear their staves: either thou, Macbeth,
    Or else my sword with an unbatter'd edge
    I sheathe again undeeded. There thou shouldst be;
    By this great clatter, one of greatest note
    Seems bruited. Let me find him, fortune!
    And more I beg not.

    Siward. This way, my lord; the castle's gently render'd:
    The tyrant's people on both sides do fight;
    The noble thanes do bravely in the war;
    The day almost itself professes yours,
    And little is to do.

6 V / 7
  • Enter, sir, the castle.
  • Enter, sir, the castle.
  • Malcolm. We have met with foes
    That strike beside us.

    Siward. Enter, sir, the castle.

7 V / 8
  • Some must go off: and yet, by these I see,
    So great a day as this is cheaply...
  • Some must go off: and yet, by these I see,
    So great a day as this is cheaply bought.
  • Malcolm. I would the friends we miss were safe arrived.

    Siward. Some must go off: and yet, by these I see,
    So great a day as this is cheaply bought.

8 V / 8
  • Then he is dead?
  • Then he is dead?
  • Ross. Your son, my lord, has paid a soldier's debt:
    He only lived but till he was a man;
    The which no sooner had his prowess confirm'd
    In the unshrinking station where he fought,
    But like a man he died.

    Siward. Then he is dead?

9 V / 8
  • Had he his hurts before?
  • Had he his hurts before?
  • Ross. Ay, and brought off the field: your cause of sorrow
    Must not be measured by his worth, for then
    It hath no end.

    Siward. Had he his hurts before?

10 V / 8
  • Why then, God's soldier be he!
    Had I as many sons as I have hairs,
    I wou...
  • Why then, God's soldier be he!
    Had I as many sons as I have hairs,
    I would not wish them to a fairer death:
    And so, his knell is knoll'd.
  • Ross. Ay, on the front.

    Siward. Why then, God's soldier be he!
    Had I as many sons as I have hairs,
    I would not wish them to a fairer death:
    And so, his knell is knoll'd.

11 V / 8
  • He's worth no more
    They say he parted well, and paid his score:
    And so,...
  • He's worth no more
    They say he parted well, and paid his score:
    And so, God be with him! Here comes newer comfort.
  • Malcolm. He's worth more sorrow,
    And that I'll spend for him.

    Siward. He's worth no more
    They say he parted well, and paid his score:
    And so, God be with him! Here comes newer comfort.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.