Speeches (Lines) for Slender in "The Merry Wives of Windsor"

Total: 56
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • In the county of Gloucester, justice of peace and
    'Coram.'
  • In the county of Gloucester, justice of peace and
    'Coram.'
  • Robert Shallow. Sir Hugh, persuade me not; I will make a Star-
    chamber matter of it: if he were twenty Sir John
    Falstaffs, he shall not abuse Robert Shallow, esquire.

    Slender. In the county of Gloucester, justice of peace and
    'Coram.'

2 I / 1
  • Ay, and 'Rato-lorum' too; and a gentleman born,
    master parson; who writes hi...
  • Ay, and 'Rato-lorum' too; and a gentleman born,
    master parson; who writes himself 'Armigero,' in any
    bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation, 'Armigero.'
  • Robert Shallow. Ay, cousin Slender, and 'Custalourum.

    Slender. Ay, and 'Rato-lorum' too; and a gentleman born,
    master parson; who writes himself 'Armigero,' in any
    bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation, 'Armigero.'

3 I / 1
  • All his successors gone before him hath done't; and
    all his ancestors that c...
  • All his successors gone before him hath done't; and
    all his ancestors that come after him may: they may
    give the dozen white luces in their coat.
  • Robert Shallow. Ay, that I do; and have done any time these three
    hundred years.

    Slender. All his successors gone before him hath done't; and
    all his ancestors that come after him may: they may
    give the dozen white luces in their coat.

4 I / 1
  • I may quarter, coz.
  • I may quarter, coz.
  • Robert Shallow. The luce is the fresh fish; the salt fish is an old coat.

    Slender. I may quarter, coz.

5 I / 1
  • Mistress Anne Page? She has brown hair, and speaks
    small like a woman.
  • Mistress Anne Page? She has brown hair, and speaks
    small like a woman.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. It is petter that friends is the sword, and end it:
    and there is also another device in my prain, which
    peradventure prings goot discretions with it: there
    is Anne Page, which is daughter to Master Thomas
    Page, which is pretty virginity.

    Slender. Mistress Anne Page? She has brown hair, and speaks
    small like a woman.

6 I / 1
  • Did her grandsire leave her seven hundred pound?
  • Did her grandsire leave her seven hundred pound?
  • Sir Hugh Evans. It is that fery person for all the orld, as just as
    you will desire; and seven hundred pounds of moneys,
    and gold and silver, is her grandsire upon his
    death's-bed--Got deliver to a joyful resurrections!
    --give, when she is able to overtake seventeen years
    old: it were a goot motion if we leave our pribbles
    and prabbles, and desire a marriage between Master
    Abraham and Mistress Anne Page.

    Slender. Did her grandsire leave her seven hundred pound?

7 I / 1
  • I know the young gentlewoman; she has good gifts.
  • I know the young gentlewoman; she has good gifts.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. Ay, and her father is make her a petter penny.

    Slender. I know the young gentlewoman; she has good gifts.

8 I / 1
  • How does your fallow greyhound, sir? I heard say he
    was outrun on Cotsall.
  • How does your fallow greyhound, sir? I heard say he
    was outrun on Cotsall.
  • Page. I am glad to see you, good Master Slender.

    Slender. How does your fallow greyhound, sir? I heard say he
    was outrun on Cotsall.

9 I / 1
  • You'll not confess, you'll not confess.
  • You'll not confess, you'll not confess.
  • Page. It could not be judged, sir.

    Slender. You'll not confess, you'll not confess.

10 I / 1
  • Marry, sir, I have matter in my head against you;
    and against your cony-catc...
  • Marry, sir, I have matter in my head against you;
    and against your cony-catching rascals, Bardolph,
    Nym, and Pistol.
  • Falstaff. Good worts! good cabbage. Slender, I broke your
    head: what matter have you against me?

    Slender. Marry, sir, I have matter in my head against you;
    and against your cony-catching rascals, Bardolph,
    Nym, and Pistol.

11 I / 1
  • Ay, it is no matter.
  • Ay, it is no matter.
  • Bardolph. You Banbury cheese!

    Slender. Ay, it is no matter.

12 I / 1
  • Ay, it is no matter.
  • Ay, it is no matter.
  • Pistol. How now, Mephostophilus!

    Slender. Ay, it is no matter.

13 I / 1
  • Where's Simple, my man? Can you tell, cousin?
  • Where's Simple, my man? Can you tell, cousin?
  • Nym. Slice, I say! pauca, pauca: slice! that's my humour.

    Slender. Where's Simple, my man? Can you tell, cousin?

14 I / 1
  • Ay, by these gloves, did he, or I would I might
    never come in mine own great...
  • Ay, by these gloves, did he, or I would I might
    never come in mine own great chamber again else, of
    seven groats in mill-sixpences, and two Edward
    shovel-boards, that cost me two shilling and two
    pence apiece of Yead Miller, by these gloves.
  • Falstaff. Pistol, did you pick Master Slender's purse?

    Slender. Ay, by these gloves, did he, or I would I might
    never come in mine own great chamber again else, of
    seven groats in mill-sixpences, and two Edward
    shovel-boards, that cost me two shilling and two
    pence apiece of Yead Miller, by these gloves.

15 I / 1
  • By these gloves, then, 'twas he.
  • By these gloves, then, 'twas he.
  • Pistol. Ha, thou mountain-foreigner! Sir John and Master mine,
    I combat challenge of this latten bilbo.
    Word of denial in thy labras here!
    Word of denial: froth and scum, thou liest!

    Slender. By these gloves, then, 'twas he.

16 I / 1
  • By this hat, then, he in the red face had it; for
    though I cannot remember w...
  • By this hat, then, he in the red face had it; for
    though I cannot remember what I did when you made me
    drunk, yet I am not altogether an ass.
  • Nym. Be avised, sir, and pass good humours: I will say
    'marry trap' with you, if you run the nuthook's
    humour on me; that is the very note of it.

    Slender. By this hat, then, he in the red face had it; for
    though I cannot remember what I did when you made me
    drunk, yet I am not altogether an ass.

17 I / 1
  • Ay, you spake in Latin then too; but 'tis no
    matter: I'll ne'er be drunk whi...
  • Ay, you spake in Latin then too; but 'tis no
    matter: I'll ne'er be drunk whilst I live again,
    but in honest, civil, godly company, for this trick:
    if I be drunk, I'll be drunk with those that have
    the fear of God, and not with drunken knaves.
  • Bardolph. And being fap, sir, was, as they say, cashiered; and
    so conclusions passed the careires.

    Slender. Ay, you spake in Latin then too; but 'tis no
    matter: I'll ne'er be drunk whilst I live again,
    but in honest, civil, godly company, for this trick:
    if I be drunk, I'll be drunk with those that have
    the fear of God, and not with drunken knaves.

18 I / 1
  • O heaven! this is Mistress Anne Page.
  • O heaven! this is Mistress Anne Page.
  • Page. Nay, daughter, carry the wine in; we'll drink within.

    Slender. O heaven! this is Mistress Anne Page.

19 I / 1
  • I had rather than forty shillings I had my Book of
    Songs and Sonnets here. <...
  • I had rather than forty shillings I had my Book of
    Songs and Sonnets here.
    [Enter SIMPLE]
    How now, Simple! where have you been? I must wait
    on myself, must I? You have not the Book of Riddles
    about you, have you?
  • Page. Wife, bid these gentlemen welcome. Come, we have a
    hot venison pasty to dinner: come, gentlemen, I hope
    we shall drink down all unkindness.

    Slender. I had rather than forty shillings I had my Book of
    Songs and Sonnets here.
    [Enter SIMPLE]
    How now, Simple! where have you been? I must wait
    on myself, must I? You have not the Book of Riddles
    about you, have you?

20 I / 1
  • Ay, sir, you shall find me reasonable; if it be so,
    I shall do that that is...
  • Ay, sir, you shall find me reasonable; if it be so,
    I shall do that that is reason.
  • Robert Shallow. Come, coz; come, coz; we stay for you. A word with
    you, coz; marry, this, coz: there is, as 'twere, a
    tender, a kind of tender, made afar off by Sir Hugh
    here. Do you understand me?

    Slender. Ay, sir, you shall find me reasonable; if it be so,
    I shall do that that is reason.

21 I / 1
  • So I do, sir.
  • So I do, sir.
  • Robert Shallow. Nay, but understand me.

    Slender. So I do, sir.

22 I / 1
  • Nay, I will do as my cousin Shallow says: I pray
    you, pardon me; he's a just...
  • Nay, I will do as my cousin Shallow says: I pray
    you, pardon me; he's a justice of peace in his
    country, simple though I stand here.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. Give ear to his motions, Master Slender: I will
    description the matter to you, if you be capacity of it.

    Slender. Nay, I will do as my cousin Shallow says: I pray
    you, pardon me; he's a justice of peace in his
    country, simple though I stand here.

23 I / 1
  • Why, if it be so, I will marry her upon any
    reasonable demands.
  • Why, if it be so, I will marry her upon any
    reasonable demands.
  • Sir Hugh Evans. Marry, is it; the very point of it; to Mistress Anne Page.

    Slender. Why, if it be so, I will marry her upon any
    reasonable demands.

24 I / 1
  • I hope, sir, I will do as it shall become one that
    would do reason.
  • I hope, sir, I will do as it shall become one that
    would do reason.
  • Robert Shallow. Cousin Abraham Slender, can you love her?

    Slender. I hope, sir, I will do as it shall become one that
    would do reason.

25 I / 1
  • I will do a greater thing than that, upon your
    request, cousin, in any reaso...
  • I will do a greater thing than that, upon your
    request, cousin, in any reason.
  • Robert Shallow. That you must. Will you, upon good dowry, marry her?

    Slender. I will do a greater thing than that, upon your
    request, cousin, in any reason.

26 I / 1
  • I will marry her, sir, at your request: but if there
    be no great love in the...
  • I will marry her, sir, at your request: but if there
    be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may
    decrease it upon better acquaintance, when we are
    married and have more occasion to know one another;
    I hope, upon familiarity will grow more contempt:
    but if you say, 'Marry her,' I will marry her; that
    I am freely dissolved, and dissolutely.
  • Robert Shallow. Nay, conceive me, conceive me, sweet coz: what I do
    is to pleasure you, coz. Can you love the maid?

    Slender. I will marry her, sir, at your request: but if there
    be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may
    decrease it upon better acquaintance, when we are
    married and have more occasion to know one another;
    I hope, upon familiarity will grow more contempt:
    but if you say, 'Marry her,' I will marry her; that
    I am freely dissolved, and dissolutely.

27 I / 1
  • Ay, or else I would I might be hanged, la!
  • Ay, or else I would I might be hanged, la!
  • Robert Shallow. Ay, I think my cousin meant well.

    Slender. Ay, or else I would I might be hanged, la!

28 I / 1
  • No, I thank you, forsooth, heartily; I am very well.
  • No, I thank you, forsooth, heartily; I am very well.
  • Anne Page. Will't please your worship to come in, sir?

    Slender. No, I thank you, forsooth, heartily; I am very well.

29 I / 1
  • I am not a-hungry, I thank you, forsooth. Go,
    sirrah, for all you are my man...
  • I am not a-hungry, I thank you, forsooth. Go,
    sirrah, for all you are my man, go wait upon my
    cousin Shallow.
    [Exit SIMPLE]
    A justice of peace sometimes may be beholding to his
    friend for a man. I keep but three men and a boy
    yet, till my mother be dead: but what though? Yet I
    live like a poor gentleman born.
  • Anne Page. The dinner attends you, sir.

    Slender. I am not a-hungry, I thank you, forsooth. Go,
    sirrah, for all you are my man, go wait upon my
    cousin Shallow.
    [Exit SIMPLE]
    A justice of peace sometimes may be beholding to his
    friend for a man. I keep but three men and a boy
    yet, till my mother be dead: but what though? Yet I
    live like a poor gentleman born.

30 I / 1
  • I' faith, I'll eat nothing; I thank you as much as
    though I did.
  • I' faith, I'll eat nothing; I thank you as much as
    though I did.
  • Anne Page. I may not go in without your worship: they will not
    sit till you come.

    Slender. I' faith, I'll eat nothing; I thank you as much as
    though I did.

31 I / 1
  • I had rather walk here, I thank you. I bruised
    my shin th' other day with pl...
  • I had rather walk here, I thank you. I bruised
    my shin th' other day with playing at sword and
    dagger with a master of fence; three veneys for a
    dish of stewed prunes; and, by my troth, I cannot
    abide the smell of hot meat since. Why do your
    dogs bark so? be there bears i' the town?
  • Anne Page. I pray you, sir, walk in.

    Slender. I had rather walk here, I thank you. I bruised
    my shin th' other day with playing at sword and
    dagger with a master of fence; three veneys for a
    dish of stewed prunes; and, by my troth, I cannot
    abide the smell of hot meat since. Why do your
    dogs bark so? be there bears i' the town?

32 I / 1
  • I love the sport well but I shall as soon quarrel at
    it as any man in Englan...
  • I love the sport well but I shall as soon quarrel at
    it as any man in England. You are afraid, if you see
    the bear loose, are you not?
  • Anne Page. I think there are, sir; I heard them talked of.

    Slender. I love the sport well but I shall as soon quarrel at
    it as any man in England. You are afraid, if you see
    the bear loose, are you not?

33 I / 1
  • That's meat and drink to me, now. I have seen
    Sackerson loose twenty times,...
  • That's meat and drink to me, now. I have seen
    Sackerson loose twenty times, and have taken him by
    the chain; but, I warrant you, the women have so
    cried and shrieked at it, that it passed: but women,
    indeed, cannot abide 'em; they are very ill-favored
    rough things.
  • Anne Page. Ay, indeed, sir.

    Slender. That's meat and drink to me, now. I have seen
    Sackerson loose twenty times, and have taken him by
    the chain; but, I warrant you, the women have so
    cried and shrieked at it, that it passed: but women,
    indeed, cannot abide 'em; they are very ill-favored
    rough things.

34 I / 1
  • I'll eat nothing, I thank you, sir.
  • I'll eat nothing, I thank you, sir.
  • Page. Come, gentle Master Slender, come; we stay for you.

    Slender. I'll eat nothing, I thank you, sir.

35 I / 1
  • Nay, pray you, lead the way.
  • Nay, pray you, lead the way.
  • Page. By cock and pie, you shall not choose, sir! come, come.

    Slender. Nay, pray you, lead the way.

36 I / 1
  • Mistress Anne, yourself shall go first.
  • Mistress Anne, yourself shall go first.
  • Page. Come on, sir.

    Slender. Mistress Anne, yourself shall go first.

37 I / 1
  • I'll rather be unmannerly than troublesome.
    You do yourself wrong, indeed, l...
  • I'll rather be unmannerly than troublesome.
    You do yourself wrong, indeed, la!
  • Anne Page. Not I, sir; pray you, keep on.

    Slender. I'll rather be unmannerly than troublesome.
    You do yourself wrong, indeed, la!

38 II / 3
  • Give you good morrow, sir.
  • Give you good morrow, sir.
  • Page. Now, good master doctor!

    Slender. Give you good morrow, sir.

39 III / 1
  • [Aside] Ah, sweet Anne Page!
  • [Aside] Ah, sweet Anne Page!
  • Robert Shallow. How now, master Parson! Good morrow, good Sir Hugh.
    Keep a gamester from the dice, and a good student
    from his book, and it is wonderful.

    Slender. [Aside] Ah, sweet Anne Page!

40 III / 1
  • [Aside] O sweet Anne Page!
  • [Aside] O sweet Anne Page!
  • Robert Shallow. Trust me, a mad host. Follow, gentlemen, follow.

    Slender. [Aside] O sweet Anne Page!

41 III / 2
  • And so must I, sir: we have appointed to dine with
    Mistress Anne, and I woul...
  • And so must I, sir: we have appointed to dine with
    Mistress Anne, and I would not break with her for
    more money than I'll speak of.
  • Robert Shallow. I must excuse myself, Master Ford.

    Slender. And so must I, sir: we have appointed to dine with
    Mistress Anne, and I would not break with her for
    more money than I'll speak of.

42 III / 2
  • I hope I have your good will, father Page.
  • I hope I have your good will, father Page.
  • Robert Shallow. We have lingered about a match between Anne Page and
    my cousin Slender, and this day we shall have our answer.

    Slender. I hope I have your good will, father Page.

43 III / 4
  • I'll make a shaft or a bolt on't: 'slid, 'tis but
    venturing.
  • I'll make a shaft or a bolt on't: 'slid, 'tis but
    venturing.
  • Robert Shallow. Break their talk, Mistress Quickly: my kinsman shall
    speak for himself.

    Slender. I'll make a shaft or a bolt on't: 'slid, 'tis but
    venturing.

44 III / 4
  • No, she shall not dismay me: I care not for that,
    but that I am afeard.
  • No, she shall not dismay me: I care not for that,
    but that I am afeard.
  • Robert Shallow. Be not dismayed.

    Slender. No, she shall not dismay me: I care not for that,
    but that I am afeard.

45 III / 4
  • I had a father, Mistress Anne; my uncle can tell you
    good jests of him. Pray...
  • I had a father, Mistress Anne; my uncle can tell you
    good jests of him. Pray you, uncle, tell Mistress
    Anne the jest, how my father stole two geese out of
    a pen, good uncle.
  • Robert Shallow. She's coming; to her, coz. O boy, thou hadst a father!

    Slender. I had a father, Mistress Anne; my uncle can tell you
    good jests of him. Pray you, uncle, tell Mistress
    Anne the jest, how my father stole two geese out of
    a pen, good uncle.

46 III / 4
  • Ay, that I do; as well as I love any woman in
    Gloucestershire.
  • Ay, that I do; as well as I love any woman in
    Gloucestershire.
  • Robert Shallow. Mistress Anne, my cousin loves you.

    Slender. Ay, that I do; as well as I love any woman in
    Gloucestershire.

47 III / 4
  • Ay, that I will, come cut and long-tail, under the
    degree of a squire.
  • Ay, that I will, come cut and long-tail, under the
    degree of a squire.
  • Robert Shallow. He will maintain you like a gentlewoman.

    Slender. Ay, that I will, come cut and long-tail, under the
    degree of a squire.

48 III / 4
  • Now, good Mistress Anne,--
  • Now, good Mistress Anne,--
  • Anne Page. Now, Master Slender,--

    Slender. Now, good Mistress Anne,--

49 III / 4
  • My will! 'od's heartlings, that's a pretty jest
    indeed! I ne'er made my will...
  • My will! 'od's heartlings, that's a pretty jest
    indeed! I ne'er made my will yet, I thank heaven; I
    am not such a sickly creature, I give heaven praise.
  • Anne Page. What is your will?

    Slender. My will! 'od's heartlings, that's a pretty jest
    indeed! I ne'er made my will yet, I thank heaven; I
    am not such a sickly creature, I give heaven praise.

50 III / 4
  • Truly, for mine own part, I would little or nothing
    with you. Your father an...
  • Truly, for mine own part, I would little or nothing
    with you. Your father and my uncle hath made
    motions: if it be my luck, so; if not, happy man be
    his dole! They can tell you how things go better
    than I can: you may ask your father; here he comes.
  • Anne Page. I mean, Master Slender, what would you with me?

    Slender. Truly, for mine own part, I would little or nothing
    with you. Your father and my uncle hath made
    motions: if it be my luck, so; if not, happy man be
    his dole! They can tell you how things go better
    than I can: you may ask your father; here he comes.

51 V / 2
  • Ay, forsooth; I have spoke with her and we have a
    nay-word how to know one a...
  • Ay, forsooth; I have spoke with her and we have a
    nay-word how to know one another: I come to her in
    white, and cry 'mum;' she cries 'budget;' and by
    that we know one another.
  • Page. Come, come; we'll couch i' the castle-ditch till we
    see the light of our fairies. Remember, son Slender,
    my daughter.

    Slender. Ay, forsooth; I have spoke with her and we have a
    nay-word how to know one another: I come to her in
    white, and cry 'mum;' she cries 'budget;' and by
    that we know one another.

52 V / 5
  • Whoa ho! ho, father Page!
  • Whoa ho! ho, father Page!
  • Mistress Page. [Aside] Doctors doubt that: if Anne Page be my
    daughter, she is, by this, Doctor Caius' wife.

    Slender. Whoa ho! ho, father Page!

53 V / 5
  • Dispatched! I'll make the best in Gloucestershire
    know on't; would I were ha...
  • Dispatched! I'll make the best in Gloucestershire
    know on't; would I were hanged, la, else.
  • Page. Son, how now! how now, son! have you dispatched?

    Slender. Dispatched! I'll make the best in Gloucestershire
    know on't; would I were hanged, la, else.

54 V / 5
  • I came yonder at Eton to marry Mistress Anne Page,
    and she's a great lubberl...
  • I came yonder at Eton to marry Mistress Anne Page,
    and she's a great lubberly boy. If it had not been
    i' the church, I would have swinged him, or he
    should have swinged me. If I did not think it had
    been Anne Page, would I might never stir!--and 'tis
    a postmaster's boy.
  • Page. Of what, son?

    Slender. I came yonder at Eton to marry Mistress Anne Page,
    and she's a great lubberly boy. If it had not been
    i' the church, I would have swinged him, or he
    should have swinged me. If I did not think it had
    been Anne Page, would I might never stir!--and 'tis
    a postmaster's boy.

55 V / 5
  • What need you tell me that? I think so, when I took
    a boy for a girl. If I h...
  • What need you tell me that? I think so, when I took
    a boy for a girl. If I had been married to him, for
    all he was in woman's apparel, I would not have had
    him.
  • Page. Upon my life, then, you took the wrong.

    Slender. What need you tell me that? I think so, when I took
    a boy for a girl. If I had been married to him, for
    all he was in woman's apparel, I would not have had
    him.

56 V / 5
  • I went to her in white, and cried 'mum,' and she
    cried 'budget,' as Anne and...
  • I went to her in white, and cried 'mum,' and she
    cried 'budget,' as Anne and I had appointed; and yet
    it was not Anne, but a postmaster's boy.
  • Page. Why, this is your own folly. Did not I tell you how
    you should know my daughter by her garments?

    Slender. I went to her in white, and cried 'mum,' and she
    cried 'budget,' as Anne and I had appointed; and yet
    it was not Anne, but a postmaster's boy.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.