Speeches (Lines) for Smith the Weaver in "History of Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 9
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 IV / 2
  • [Aside] But now of late, notable to travel with her
    furred pack, she washes...
  • [Aside] But now of late, notable to travel with her
    furred pack, she washes bucks here at home.
  • Dick the Butcher. [Aside] She was, indeed, a pedler's daughter, and
    sold many laces.

    Smith the Weaver. [Aside] But now of late, notable to travel with her
    furred pack, she washes bucks here at home.

2 IV / 2
  • [Aside] A' must needs; for beggary is valiant.
  • [Aside] A' must needs; for beggary is valiant.
  • Jack Cade. Valiant I am.

    Smith the Weaver. [Aside] A' must needs; for beggary is valiant.

3 IV / 2
  • [Aside] He need not fear the sword; for his coat is of proof.
  • [Aside] He need not fear the sword; for his coat is of proof.
  • Jack Cade. I fear neither sword nor fire.

    Smith the Weaver. [Aside] He need not fear the sword; for his coat is of proof.

4 IV / 2
  • The clerk of Chatham: he can write and read and
    cast accompt.
  • The clerk of Chatham: he can write and read and
    cast accompt.
  • Jack Cade. Nay, that I mean to do. Is not this a lamentable
    thing, that of the skin of an innocent lamb should
    be made parchment? that parchment, being scribbled
    o'er, should undo a man? Some say the bee stings:
    but I say, 'tis the bee's wax; for I did but seal
    once to a thing, and I was never mine own man
    since. How now! who's there?

    Smith the Weaver. The clerk of Chatham: he can write and read and
    cast accompt.

5 IV / 2
  • We took him setting of boys' copies.
  • We took him setting of boys' copies.
  • Jack Cade. O monstrous!

    Smith the Weaver. We took him setting of boys' copies.

6 IV / 2
  • Has a book in his pocket with red letters in't.
  • Has a book in his pocket with red letters in't.
  • Jack Cade. Here's a villain!

    Smith the Weaver. Has a book in his pocket with red letters in't.

7 IV / 2
  • Sir, he made a chimney in my father's house, and
    the bricks are alive at thi...
  • Sir, he made a chimney in my father's house, and
    the bricks are alive at this day to testify it;
    therefore deny it not.
  • Dick the Butcher. Nay, 'tis too true; therefore he shall be king.

    Smith the Weaver. Sir, he made a chimney in my father's house, and
    the bricks are alive at this day to testify it;
    therefore deny it not.

8 IV / 6
  • If this fellow be wise, he'll never call ye Jack
    Cade more: I think he hath...
  • If this fellow be wise, he'll never call ye Jack
    Cade more: I think he hath a very fair warning.
  • Jack Cade. Knock him down there.

    Smith the Weaver. If this fellow be wise, he'll never call ye Jack
    Cade more: I think he hath a very fair warning.

9 IV / 7
  • [Aside] Nay, John, it will be stinking law for his
    breath stinks with eating...
  • [Aside] Nay, John, it will be stinking law for his
    breath stinks with eating toasted cheese.
  • John Holland. [Aside] Mass, 'twill be sore law, then; for he was
    thrust in the mouth with a spear, and 'tis not whole
    yet.

    Smith the Weaver. [Aside] Nay, John, it will be stinking law for his
    breath stinks with eating toasted cheese.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.