Speeches (Lines) for Stephano in "The Tempest"

Total: 60
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 2
  • I shall no more to sea, to sea,
    Here shall I die ashore--
    This is a very...
  • I shall no more to sea, to sea,
    Here shall I die ashore--
    This is a very scurvy tune to sing at a man's
    funeral: well, here's my comfort. [Drinks]
    [Sings]
    The master, the swabber, the boatswain and I,
    The gunner and his mate
    Loved Mall, Meg and Marian and Margery,
    But none of us cared for Kate;
    For she had a tongue with a tang,
    Would cry to a sailor, Go hang!
    She loved not the savour of tar nor of pitch,
    Yet a tailor might scratch her where'er she did itch:
    Then to sea, boys, and let her go hang!
    This is a scurvy tune too: but here's my comfort.
  • Trinculo. Here's neither bush nor shrub, to bear off
    any weather at all, and another storm brewing;
    I hear it sing i' the wind: yond same black
    cloud, yond huge one, looks like a foul
    bombard that would shed his liquor. If it
    should thunder as it did before, I know not
    where to hide my head: yond same cloud cannot
    choose but fall by pailfuls. What have we
    here? a man or a fish? dead or alive? A fish:
    he smells like a fish; a very ancient and fish-
    like smell; a kind of not of the newest Poor-
    John. A strange fish! Were I in England now,
    as once I was, and had but this fish painted,
    not a holiday fool there but would give a piece
    of silver: there would this monster make a
    man; any strange beast there makes a man:
    when they will not give a doit to relieve a lame
    beggar, they will lazy out ten to see a dead
    Indian. Legged like a man and his fins like
    arms! Warm o' my troth! I do now let loose
    my opinion; hold it no longer: this is no fish,
    but an islander, that hath lately suffered by a
    thunderbolt.
    [Thunder]
    Alas, the storm is come again! my best way is to
    creep under his gaberdine; there is no other
    shelter hereabouts: misery acquaints a man with
    strange bed-fellows. I will here shroud till the
    dregs of the storm be past.

    Stephano. I shall no more to sea, to sea,
    Here shall I die ashore--
    This is a very scurvy tune to sing at a man's
    funeral: well, here's my comfort. [Drinks]
    [Sings]
    The master, the swabber, the boatswain and I,
    The gunner and his mate
    Loved Mall, Meg and Marian and Margery,
    But none of us cared for Kate;
    For she had a tongue with a tang,
    Would cry to a sailor, Go hang!
    She loved not the savour of tar nor of pitch,
    Yet a tailor might scratch her where'er she did itch:
    Then to sea, boys, and let her go hang!
    This is a scurvy tune too: but here's my comfort.

2 II / 2
  • What's the matter? Have we devils here? Do you put
    tricks upon's with savage...
  • What's the matter? Have we devils here? Do you put
    tricks upon's with savages and men of Ind, ha? I
    have not scaped drowning to be afeard now of your
    four legs; for it hath been said, As proper a man as
    ever went on four legs cannot make him give ground;
    and it shall be said so again while Stephano
    breathes at's nostrils.
  • Caliban. Do not torment me: Oh!

    Stephano. What's the matter? Have we devils here? Do you put
    tricks upon's with savages and men of Ind, ha? I
    have not scaped drowning to be afeard now of your
    four legs; for it hath been said, As proper a man as
    ever went on four legs cannot make him give ground;
    and it shall be said so again while Stephano
    breathes at's nostrils.

3 II / 2
  • This is some monster of the isle with four legs, who
    hath got, as I take it,...
  • This is some monster of the isle with four legs, who
    hath got, as I take it, an ague. Where the devil
    should he learn our language? I will give him some
    relief, if it be but for that. if I can recover him
    and keep him tame and get to Naples with him, he's a
    present for any emperor that ever trod on neat's leather.
  • Caliban. The spirit torments me; Oh!

    Stephano. This is some monster of the isle with four legs, who
    hath got, as I take it, an ague. Where the devil
    should he learn our language? I will give him some
    relief, if it be but for that. if I can recover him
    and keep him tame and get to Naples with him, he's a
    present for any emperor that ever trod on neat's leather.

4 II / 2
  • He's in his fit now and does not talk after the
    wisest. He shall taste of my...
  • He's in his fit now and does not talk after the
    wisest. He shall taste of my bottle: if he have
    never drunk wine afore will go near to remove his
    fit. If I can recover him and keep him tame, I will
    not take too much for him; he shall pay for him that
    hath him, and that soundly.
  • Caliban. Do not torment me, prithee; I'll bring my wood home faster.

    Stephano. He's in his fit now and does not talk after the
    wisest. He shall taste of my bottle: if he have
    never drunk wine afore will go near to remove his
    fit. If I can recover him and keep him tame, I will
    not take too much for him; he shall pay for him that
    hath him, and that soundly.

5 II / 2
  • Come on your ways; open your mouth; here is that
    which will give language to...
  • Come on your ways; open your mouth; here is that
    which will give language to you, cat: open your
    mouth; this will shake your shaking, I can tell you,
    and that soundly: you cannot tell who's your friend:
    open your chaps again.
  • Caliban. Thou dost me yet but little hurt; thou wilt anon, I
    know it by thy trembling: now Prosper works upon thee.

    Stephano. Come on your ways; open your mouth; here is that
    which will give language to you, cat: open your
    mouth; this will shake your shaking, I can tell you,
    and that soundly: you cannot tell who's your friend:
    open your chaps again.

6 II / 2
  • Four legs and two voices: a most delicate monster!
    His forward voice now is...
  • Four legs and two voices: a most delicate monster!
    His forward voice now is to speak well of his
    friend; his backward voice is to utter foul speeches
    and to detract. If all the wine in my bottle will
    recover him, I will help his ague. Come. Amen! I
    will pour some in thy other mouth.
  • Trinculo. I should know that voice: it should be--but he is
    drowned; and these are devils: O defend me!

    Stephano. Four legs and two voices: a most delicate monster!
    His forward voice now is to speak well of his
    friend; his backward voice is to utter foul speeches
    and to detract. If all the wine in my bottle will
    recover him, I will help his ague. Come. Amen! I
    will pour some in thy other mouth.

7 II / 2
  • Doth thy other mouth call me? Mercy, mercy! This is
    a devil, and no monster:...
  • Doth thy other mouth call me? Mercy, mercy! This is
    a devil, and no monster: I will leave him; I have no
    long spoon.
  • Trinculo. Stephano!

    Stephano. Doth thy other mouth call me? Mercy, mercy! This is
    a devil, and no monster: I will leave him; I have no
    long spoon.

8 II / 2
  • If thou beest Trinculo, come forth: I'll pull thee
    by the lesser legs: if an...
  • If thou beest Trinculo, come forth: I'll pull thee
    by the lesser legs: if any be Trinculo's legs,
    these are they. Thou art very Trinculo indeed! How
    camest thou to be the siege of this moon-calf? can
    he vent Trinculos?
  • Trinculo. Stephano! If thou beest Stephano, touch me and
    speak to me: for I am Trinculo--be not afeard--thy
    good friend Trinculo.

    Stephano. If thou beest Trinculo, come forth: I'll pull thee
    by the lesser legs: if any be Trinculo's legs,
    these are they. Thou art very Trinculo indeed! How
    camest thou to be the siege of this moon-calf? can
    he vent Trinculos?

9 II / 2
  • Prithee, do not turn me about; my stomach is not constant.
  • Prithee, do not turn me about; my stomach is not constant.
  • Trinculo. I took him to be killed with a thunder-stroke. But
    art thou not drowned, Stephano? I hope now thou art
    not drowned. Is the storm overblown? I hid me
    under the dead moon-calf's gaberdine for fear of
    the storm. And art thou living, Stephano? O
    Stephano, two Neapolitans 'scaped!

    Stephano. Prithee, do not turn me about; my stomach is not constant.

10 II / 2
  • How didst thou 'scape? How camest thou hither?
    swear by this bottle how thou...
  • How didst thou 'scape? How camest thou hither?
    swear by this bottle how thou camest hither. I
    escaped upon a butt of sack which the sailors
    heaved o'erboard, by this bottle; which I made of
    the bark of a tree with mine own hands since I was
    cast ashore.
  • Caliban. [Aside] These be fine things, an if they be
    not sprites.
    That's a brave god and bears celestial liquor.
    I will kneel to him.

    Stephano. How didst thou 'scape? How camest thou hither?
    swear by this bottle how thou camest hither. I
    escaped upon a butt of sack which the sailors
    heaved o'erboard, by this bottle; which I made of
    the bark of a tree with mine own hands since I was
    cast ashore.

11 II / 2
  • Here; swear then how thou escapedst.
  • Here; swear then how thou escapedst.
  • Caliban. I'll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject;
    for the liquor is not earthly.

    Stephano. Here; swear then how thou escapedst.

12 II / 2
  • Here, kiss the book. Though thou canst swim like a
    duck, thou art made like...
  • Here, kiss the book. Though thou canst swim like a
    duck, thou art made like a goose.
  • Trinculo. Swum ashore. man, like a duck: I can swim like a
    duck, I'll be sworn.

    Stephano. Here, kiss the book. Though thou canst swim like a
    duck, thou art made like a goose.

13 II / 2
  • The whole butt, man: my cellar is in a rock by the
    sea-side where my wine is...
  • The whole butt, man: my cellar is in a rock by the
    sea-side where my wine is hid. How now, moon-calf!
    how does thine ague?
  • Trinculo. O Stephano. hast any more of this?

    Stephano. The whole butt, man: my cellar is in a rock by the
    sea-side where my wine is hid. How now, moon-calf!
    how does thine ague?

14 II / 2
  • Out o' the moon, I do assure thee: I was the man i'
    the moon when time was.
  • Out o' the moon, I do assure thee: I was the man i'
    the moon when time was.
  • Caliban. Hast thou not dropp'd from heaven?

    Stephano. Out o' the moon, I do assure thee: I was the man i'
    the moon when time was.

15 II / 2
  • Come, swear to that; kiss the book: I will furnish
    it anon with new contents...
  • Come, swear to that; kiss the book: I will furnish
    it anon with new contents swear.
  • Caliban. I have seen thee in her and I do adore thee:
    My mistress show'd me thee and thy dog and thy bush.

    Stephano. Come, swear to that; kiss the book: I will furnish
    it anon with new contents swear.

16 II / 2
  • Come on then; down, and swear.
  • Come on then; down, and swear.
  • Caliban. I'll kiss thy foot; I'll swear myself thy subject.

    Stephano. Come on then; down, and swear.

17 II / 2
  • Come, kiss.
  • Come, kiss.
  • Trinculo. I shall laugh myself to death at this puppy-headed
    monster. A most scurvy monster! I could find in my
    heart to beat him,--

    Stephano. Come, kiss.

18 II / 2
  • I prithee now, lead the way without any more
    talking. Trinculo, the king and...
  • I prithee now, lead the way without any more
    talking. Trinculo, the king and all our company
    else being drowned, we will inherit here: here;
    bear my bottle: fellow Trinculo, we'll fill him by
    and by again.
  • Caliban. I prithee, let me bring thee where crabs grow;
    And I with my long nails will dig thee pignuts;
    Show thee a jay's nest and instruct thee how
    To snare the nimble marmoset; I'll bring thee
    To clustering filberts and sometimes I'll get thee
    Young scamels from the rock. Wilt thou go with me?

    Stephano. I prithee now, lead the way without any more
    talking. Trinculo, the king and all our company
    else being drowned, we will inherit here: here;
    bear my bottle: fellow Trinculo, we'll fill him by
    and by again.

19 II / 2
  • O brave monster! Lead the way.
  • O brave monster! Lead the way.
  • Caliban. No more dams I'll make for fish
    Nor fetch in firing
    At requiring;
    Nor scrape trencher, nor wash dish
    'Ban, 'Ban, Cacaliban
    Has a new master: get a new man.
    Freedom, hey-day! hey-day, freedom! freedom,
    hey-day, freedom!

    Stephano. O brave monster! Lead the way.

20 III / 2
  • Tell not me; when the butt is out, we will drink
    water; not a drop before: t...
  • Tell not me; when the butt is out, we will drink
    water; not a drop before: therefore bear up, and
    board 'em. Servant-monster, drink to me.
  • Prospero. So glad of this as they I cannot be,
    Who are surprised withal; but my rejoicing
    At nothing can be more. I'll to my book,
    For yet ere supper-time must I perform
    Much business appertaining.

    Stephano. Tell not me; when the butt is out, we will drink
    water; not a drop before: therefore bear up, and
    board 'em. Servant-monster, drink to me.

21 III / 2
  • Drink, servant-monster, when I bid thee: thy eyes
    are almost set in thy head...
  • Drink, servant-monster, when I bid thee: thy eyes
    are almost set in thy head.
  • Trinculo. Servant-monster! the folly of this island! They
    say there's but five upon this isle: we are three
    of them; if th' other two be brained like us, the
    state totters.

    Stephano. Drink, servant-monster, when I bid thee: thy eyes
    are almost set in thy head.

22 III / 2
  • My man-monster hath drown'd his tongue in sack:
    for my part, the sea cannot...
  • My man-monster hath drown'd his tongue in sack:
    for my part, the sea cannot drown me; I swam, ere I
    could recover the shore, five and thirty leagues off
    and on. By this light, thou shalt be my lieutenant,
    monster, or my standard.
  • Trinculo. Where should they be set else? he were a brave
    monster indeed, if they were set in his tail.

    Stephano. My man-monster hath drown'd his tongue in sack:
    for my part, the sea cannot drown me; I swam, ere I
    could recover the shore, five and thirty leagues off
    and on. By this light, thou shalt be my lieutenant,
    monster, or my standard.

23 III / 2
  • We'll not run, Monsieur Monster.
  • We'll not run, Monsieur Monster.
  • Trinculo. Your lieutenant, if you list; he's no standard.

    Stephano. We'll not run, Monsieur Monster.

24 III / 2
  • Moon-calf, speak once in thy life, if thou beest a
    good moon-calf.
  • Moon-calf, speak once in thy life, if thou beest a
    good moon-calf.
  • Trinculo. Nor go neither; but you'll lie like dogs and yet say
    nothing neither.

    Stephano. Moon-calf, speak once in thy life, if thou beest a
    good moon-calf.

25 III / 2
  • Trinculo, keep a good tongue in your head: if you
    prove a mutineer,--the nex...
  • Trinculo, keep a good tongue in your head: if you
    prove a mutineer,--the next tree! The poor monster's
    my subject and he shall not suffer indignity.
  • Caliban. Lo, lo, again! bite him to death, I prithee.

    Stephano. Trinculo, keep a good tongue in your head: if you
    prove a mutineer,--the next tree! The poor monster's
    my subject and he shall not suffer indignity.

26 III / 2
  • Marry, will I. kneel and repeat it; I will stand,
    and so shall Trinculo.
  • Marry, will I. kneel and repeat it; I will stand,
    and so shall Trinculo.
  • Caliban. I thank my noble lord. Wilt thou be pleased to
    hearken once again to the suit I made to thee?

    Stephano. Marry, will I. kneel and repeat it; I will stand,
    and so shall Trinculo.

27 III / 2
  • Trinculo, if you trouble him any more in's tale, by
    this hand, I will suppla...
  • Trinculo, if you trouble him any more in's tale, by
    this hand, I will supplant some of your teeth.
  • Caliban. Thou liest, thou jesting monkey, thou: I would my
    valiant master would destroy thee! I do not lie.

    Stephano. Trinculo, if you trouble him any more in's tale, by
    this hand, I will supplant some of your teeth.

28 III / 2
  • Mum, then, and no more. Proceed.
  • Mum, then, and no more. Proceed.
  • Trinculo. Why, I said nothing.

    Stephano. Mum, then, and no more. Proceed.

29 III / 2
  • That's most certain.
  • That's most certain.
  • Caliban. I say, by sorcery he got this isle;
    From me he got it. if thy greatness will
    Revenge it on him,--for I know thou darest,
    But this thing dare not,--

    Stephano. That's most certain.

30 III / 2
  • How now shall this be compassed?
    Canst thou bring me to the party?
  • How now shall this be compassed?
    Canst thou bring me to the party?
  • Caliban. Thou shalt be lord of it and I'll serve thee.

    Stephano. How now shall this be compassed?
    Canst thou bring me to the party?

31 III / 2
  • Trinculo, run into no further danger:
    interrupt the monster one word further...
  • Trinculo, run into no further danger:
    interrupt the monster one word further, and,
    by this hand, I'll turn my mercy out o' doors
    and make a stock-fish of thee.
  • Caliban. What a pied ninny's this! Thou scurvy patch!
    I do beseech thy greatness, give him blows
    And take his bottle from him: when that's gone
    He shall drink nought but brine; for I'll not show him
    Where the quick freshes are.

    Stephano. Trinculo, run into no further danger:
    interrupt the monster one word further, and,
    by this hand, I'll turn my mercy out o' doors
    and make a stock-fish of thee.

32 III / 2
  • Didst thou not say he lied?
  • Didst thou not say he lied?
  • Trinculo. Why, what did I? I did nothing. I'll go farther
    off.

    Stephano. Didst thou not say he lied?

33 III / 2
  • Do I so? take thou that.
    [Beats TRINCULO]
    As you like this, give me the...
  • Do I so? take thou that.
    [Beats TRINCULO]
    As you like this, give me the lie another time.
  • Ariel. Thou liest.

    Stephano. Do I so? take thou that.
    [Beats TRINCULO]
    As you like this, give me the lie another time.

34 III / 2
  • Now, forward with your tale. Prithee, stand farther
    off.
  • Now, forward with your tale. Prithee, stand farther
    off.
  • Caliban. Ha, ha, ha!

    Stephano. Now, forward with your tale. Prithee, stand farther
    off.

35 III / 2
  • Stand farther. Come, proceed.
  • Stand farther. Come, proceed.
  • Caliban. Beat him enough: after a little time
    I'll beat him too.

    Stephano. Stand farther. Come, proceed.

36 III / 2
  • Is it so brave a lass?
  • Is it so brave a lass?
  • Caliban. Why, as I told thee, 'tis a custom with him,
    I' th' afternoon to sleep: there thou mayst brain him,
    Having first seized his books, or with a log
    Batter his skull, or paunch him with a stake,
    Or cut his wezand with thy knife. Remember
    First to possess his books; for without them
    He's but a sot, as I am, nor hath not
    One spirit to command: they all do hate him
    As rootedly as I. Burn but his books.
    He has brave utensils,--for so he calls them--
    Which when he has a house, he'll deck withal
    And that most deeply to consider is
    The beauty of his daughter; he himself
    Calls her a nonpareil: I never saw a woman,
    But only Sycorax my dam and she;
    But she as far surpasseth Sycorax
    As great'st does least.

    Stephano. Is it so brave a lass?

37 III / 2
  • Monster, I will kill this man: his daughter and I
    will be king and queen--sa...
  • Monster, I will kill this man: his daughter and I
    will be king and queen--save our graces!--and
    Trinculo and thyself shall be viceroys. Dost thou
    like the plot, Trinculo?
  • Caliban. Ay, lord; she will become thy bed, I warrant.
    And bring thee forth brave brood.

    Stephano. Monster, I will kill this man: his daughter and I
    will be king and queen--save our graces!--and
    Trinculo and thyself shall be viceroys. Dost thou
    like the plot, Trinculo?

38 III / 2
  • Give me thy hand: I am sorry I beat thee; but,
    while thou livest, keep a goo...
  • Give me thy hand: I am sorry I beat thee; but,
    while thou livest, keep a good tongue in thy head.
  • Trinculo. Excellent.

    Stephano. Give me thy hand: I am sorry I beat thee; but,
    while thou livest, keep a good tongue in thy head.

39 III / 2
  • Ay, on mine honour.
  • Ay, on mine honour.
  • Caliban. Within this half hour will he be asleep:
    Wilt thou destroy him then?

    Stephano. Ay, on mine honour.

40 III / 2
  • At thy request, monster, I will do reason, any
    reason. Come on, Trinculo, le...
  • At thy request, monster, I will do reason, any
    reason. Come on, Trinculo, let us sing.
    [Sings]
    Flout 'em and scout 'em
    And scout 'em and flout 'em
    Thought is free.
  • Caliban. Thou makest me merry; I am full of pleasure:
    Let us be jocund: will you troll the catch
    You taught me but while-ere?

    Stephano. At thy request, monster, I will do reason, any
    reason. Come on, Trinculo, let us sing.
    [Sings]
    Flout 'em and scout 'em
    And scout 'em and flout 'em
    Thought is free.

41 III / 2
  • What is this same?
  • What is this same?
  • Caliban. That's not the tune.

    Stephano. What is this same?

42 III / 2
  • If thou beest a man, show thyself in thy likeness:
    if thou beest a devil, ta...
  • If thou beest a man, show thyself in thy likeness:
    if thou beest a devil, take't as thou list.
  • Trinculo. This is the tune of our catch, played by the picture
    of Nobody.

    Stephano. If thou beest a man, show thyself in thy likeness:
    if thou beest a devil, take't as thou list.

43 III / 2
  • He that dies pays all debts: I defy thee. Mercy upon us!
  • He that dies pays all debts: I defy thee. Mercy upon us!
  • Trinculo. O, forgive me my sins!

    Stephano. He that dies pays all debts: I defy thee. Mercy upon us!

44 III / 2
  • No, monster, not I.
  • No, monster, not I.
  • Caliban. Art thou afeard?

    Stephano. No, monster, not I.

45 III / 2
  • This will prove a brave kingdom to me, where I shall
    have my music for nothi...
  • This will prove a brave kingdom to me, where I shall
    have my music for nothing.
  • Caliban. Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
    Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
    Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
    Will hum about mine ears, and sometime voices
    That, if I then had waked after long sleep,
    Will make me sleep again: and then, in dreaming,
    The clouds methought would open and show riches
    Ready to drop upon me that, when I waked,
    I cried to dream again.

    Stephano. This will prove a brave kingdom to me, where I shall
    have my music for nothing.

46 III / 2
  • That shall be by and by: I remember the story.
  • That shall be by and by: I remember the story.
  • Caliban. When Prospero is destroyed.

    Stephano. That shall be by and by: I remember the story.

47 III / 2
  • Lead, monster; we'll follow. I would I could see
    this tabourer; he lays it o...
  • Lead, monster; we'll follow. I would I could see
    this tabourer; he lays it on.
  • Trinculo. The sound is going away; let's follow it, and
    after do our work.

    Stephano. Lead, monster; we'll follow. I would I could see
    this tabourer; he lays it on.

48 IV / 1
  • Monster, your fairy, which you say is
    a harmless fairy, has done little bett...
  • Monster, your fairy, which you say is
    a harmless fairy, has done little better than
    played the Jack with us.
  • Caliban. Pray you, tread softly, that the blind mole may not
    Hear a foot fall: we now are near his cell.

    Stephano. Monster, your fairy, which you say is
    a harmless fairy, has done little better than
    played the Jack with us.

49 IV / 1
  • So is mine. Do you hear, monster? If I should take
    a displeasure against you...
  • So is mine. Do you hear, monster? If I should take
    a displeasure against you, look you,--
  • Trinculo. Monster, I do smell all horse-piss; at
    which my nose is in great indignation.

    Stephano. So is mine. Do you hear, monster? If I should take
    a displeasure against you, look you,--

50 IV / 1
  • There is not only disgrace and dishonour in that,
    monster, but an infinite l...
  • There is not only disgrace and dishonour in that,
    monster, but an infinite loss.
  • Trinculo. Ay, but to lose our bottles in the pool,--

    Stephano. There is not only disgrace and dishonour in that,
    monster, but an infinite loss.

51 IV / 1
  • I will fetch off my bottle, though I be o'er ears
    for my labour.
  • I will fetch off my bottle, though I be o'er ears
    for my labour.
  • Trinculo. That's more to me than my wetting: yet this is your
    harmless fairy, monster.

    Stephano. I will fetch off my bottle, though I be o'er ears
    for my labour.

52 IV / 1
  • Give me thy hand. I do begin to have bloody thoughts.
  • Give me thy hand. I do begin to have bloody thoughts.
  • Caliban. Prithee, my king, be quiet. Seest thou here,
    This is the mouth o' the cell: no noise, and enter.
    Do that good mischief which may make this island
    Thine own for ever, and I, thy Caliban,
    For aye thy foot-licker.

    Stephano. Give me thy hand. I do begin to have bloody thoughts.

53 IV / 1
  • Put off that gown, Trinculo; by this hand, I'll have
    that gown.
  • Put off that gown, Trinculo; by this hand, I'll have
    that gown.
  • Trinculo. O, ho, monster! we know what belongs to a frippery.
    O king Stephano!

    Stephano. Put off that gown, Trinculo; by this hand, I'll have
    that gown.

54 IV / 1
  • Be you quiet, monster. Mistress line,
    is not this my jerkin? Now is the jerk...
  • Be you quiet, monster. Mistress line,
    is not this my jerkin? Now is the jerkin under
    the line: now, jerkin, you are like to lose your
    hair and prove a bald jerkin.
  • Caliban. The dropsy drown this fool I what do you mean
    To dote thus on such luggage? Let's alone
    And do the murder first: if he awake,
    From toe to crown he'll fill our skins with pinches,
    Make us strange stuff.

    Stephano. Be you quiet, monster. Mistress line,
    is not this my jerkin? Now is the jerkin under
    the line: now, jerkin, you are like to lose your
    hair and prove a bald jerkin.

55 IV / 1
  • I thank thee for that jest; here's a garment for't:
    wit shall not go unrewar...
  • I thank thee for that jest; here's a garment for't:
    wit shall not go unrewarded while I am king of this
    country. 'Steal by line and level' is an excellent
    pass of pate; there's another garment for't.
  • Trinculo. Do, do: we steal by line and level, an't like your grace.

    Stephano. I thank thee for that jest; here's a garment for't:
    wit shall not go unrewarded while I am king of this
    country. 'Steal by line and level' is an excellent
    pass of pate; there's another garment for't.

56 IV / 1
  • Monster, lay-to your fingers: help to bear this
    away where my hogshead of wi...
  • Monster, lay-to your fingers: help to bear this
    away where my hogshead of wine is, or I'll turn you
    out of my kingdom: go to, carry this.
  • Caliban. I will have none on't: we shall lose our time,
    And all be turn'd to barnacles, or to apes
    With foreheads villanous low.

    Stephano. Monster, lay-to your fingers: help to bear this
    away where my hogshead of wine is, or I'll turn you
    out of my kingdom: go to, carry this.

57 IV / 1
  • Ay, and this.
    [A noise of hunters heard. Enter divers Spirits,]
    in shape...
  • Ay, and this.
    [A noise of hunters heard. Enter divers Spirits,]
    in shape of dogs and hounds, and hunt them about,
    PROSPERO and ARIEL setting them on]
  • Trinculo. And this.

    Stephano. Ay, and this.
    [A noise of hunters heard. Enter divers Spirits,]
    in shape of dogs and hounds, and hunt them about,
    PROSPERO and ARIEL setting them on]

58 V / 1
  • Every man shift for all the rest, and
    let no man take care for himself; for...
  • Every man shift for all the rest, and
    let no man take care for himself; for all is
    but fortune. Coragio, bully-monster, coragio!
  • Prospero. Sir, my liege,
    Do not infest your mind with beating on
    The strangeness of this business; at pick'd leisure
    Which shall be shortly, single I'll resolve you,
    Which to you shall seem probable, of every
    These happen'd accidents; till when, be cheerful
    And think of each thing well.
    [Aside to ARIEL]
    Come hither, spirit:
    Set Caliban and his companions free;
    Untie the spell.
    [Exit ARIEL]
    How fares my gracious sir?
    There are yet missing of your company
    Some few odd lads that you remember not.
    [Re-enter ARIEL, driving in CALIBAN, STEPHANO]
    and TRINCULO, in their stolen apparel]

    Stephano. Every man shift for all the rest, and
    let no man take care for himself; for all is
    but fortune. Coragio, bully-monster, coragio!

59 V / 1
  • O, touch me not; I am not Stephano, but a cramp.
  • O, touch me not; I am not Stephano, but a cramp.
  • Sebastian. Why, how now, Stephano!

    Stephano. O, touch me not; I am not Stephano, but a cramp.

60 V / 1
  • I should have been a sore one then.
  • I should have been a sore one then.
  • Prospero. You'ld be king o' the isle, sirrah?

    Stephano. I should have been a sore one then.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.