Speeches (Lines) for Surveyor in "History of Henry VIII"

Total: 9
print
# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • First, it was usual with him, every day
    It would infect his speech, that if...
  • First, it was usual with him, every day
    It would infect his speech, that if the king
    Should without issue die, he'll carry it so
    To make the sceptre his: these very words
    I've heard him utter to his son-in-law,
    Lord Abergavenny; to whom by oath he menaced
    Revenge upon the cardinal.
  • Henry VIII. Speak freely.

    Surveyor. First, it was usual with him, every day
    It would infect his speech, that if the king
    Should without issue die, he'll carry it so
    To make the sceptre his: these very words
    I've heard him utter to his son-in-law,
    Lord Abergavenny; to whom by oath he menaced
    Revenge upon the cardinal.

2 I / 2
  • He was brought to this
    By a vain prophecy of Nicholas Hopkins.
  • He was brought to this
    By a vain prophecy of Nicholas Hopkins.
  • Henry VIII. Speak on:
    How grounded he his title to the crown,
    Upon our fail? to this point hast thou heard him
    At any time speak aught?

    Surveyor. He was brought to this
    By a vain prophecy of Nicholas Hopkins.

3 I / 2
  • Sir, a Chartreux friar,
    His confessor, who fed him every minute
    With wor...
  • Sir, a Chartreux friar,
    His confessor, who fed him every minute
    With words of sovereignty.
  • Henry VIII. What was that Hopkins?

    Surveyor. Sir, a Chartreux friar,
    His confessor, who fed him every minute
    With words of sovereignty.

4 I / 2
  • Not long before your highness sped to France,
    The duke being at the Rose, wi...
  • Not long before your highness sped to France,
    The duke being at the Rose, within the parish
    Saint Lawrence Poultney, did of me demand
    What was the speech among the Londoners
    Concerning the French journey: I replied,
    Men fear'd the French would prove perfidious,
    To the king's danger. Presently the duke
    Said, 'twas the fear, indeed; and that he doubted
    'Twould prove the verity of certain words
    Spoke by a holy monk; 'that oft,' says he,
    'Hath sent to me, wishing me to permit
    John de la Car, my chaplain, a choice hour
    To hear from him a matter of some moment:
    Whom after under the confession's seal
    He solemnly had sworn, that what he spoke
    My chaplain to no creature living, but
    To me, should utter, with demure confidence
    This pausingly ensued: neither the king nor's heirs,
    Tell you the duke, shall prosper: bid him strive
    To gain the love o' the commonalty: the duke
    Shall govern England.'
  • Henry VIII. How know'st thou this?

    Surveyor. Not long before your highness sped to France,
    The duke being at the Rose, within the parish
    Saint Lawrence Poultney, did of me demand
    What was the speech among the Londoners
    Concerning the French journey: I replied,
    Men fear'd the French would prove perfidious,
    To the king's danger. Presently the duke
    Said, 'twas the fear, indeed; and that he doubted
    'Twould prove the verity of certain words
    Spoke by a holy monk; 'that oft,' says he,
    'Hath sent to me, wishing me to permit
    John de la Car, my chaplain, a choice hour
    To hear from him a matter of some moment:
    Whom after under the confession's seal
    He solemnly had sworn, that what he spoke
    My chaplain to no creature living, but
    To me, should utter, with demure confidence
    This pausingly ensued: neither the king nor's heirs,
    Tell you the duke, shall prosper: bid him strive
    To gain the love o' the commonalty: the duke
    Shall govern England.'

5 I / 2
  • On my soul, I'll speak but truth.
    I told my lord the duke, by the devil's il...
  • On my soul, I'll speak but truth.
    I told my lord the duke, by the devil's illusions
    The monk might be deceived; and that 'twas dangerous for him
    To ruminate on this so far, until
    It forged him some design, which, being believed,
    It was much like to do: he answer'd, 'Tush,
    It can do me no damage;' adding further,
    That, had the king in his last sickness fail'd,
    The cardinal's and Sir Thomas Lovell's heads
    Should have gone off.
  • Henry VIII. Let him on.
    Go forward.

    Surveyor. On my soul, I'll speak but truth.
    I told my lord the duke, by the devil's illusions
    The monk might be deceived; and that 'twas dangerous for him
    To ruminate on this so far, until
    It forged him some design, which, being believed,
    It was much like to do: he answer'd, 'Tush,
    It can do me no damage;' adding further,
    That, had the king in his last sickness fail'd,
    The cardinal's and Sir Thomas Lovell's heads
    Should have gone off.

6 I / 2
  • I can, my liege.
  • I can, my liege.
  • Henry VIII. Ha! what, so rank? Ah ha!
    There's mischief in this man: canst thou say further?

    Surveyor. I can, my liege.

7 I / 2
  • Being at Greenwich,
    After your highness had reproved the duke
    About Sir...
  • Being at Greenwich,
    After your highness had reproved the duke
    About Sir William Blomer,--
  • Henry VIII. Proceed.

    Surveyor. Being at Greenwich,
    After your highness had reproved the duke
    About Sir William Blomer,--

8 I / 2
  • 'If,' quoth he, 'I for this had been committed,
    As, to the Tower, I thought,...
  • 'If,' quoth he, 'I for this had been committed,
    As, to the Tower, I thought, I would have play'd
    The part my father meant to act upon
    The usurper Richard; who, being at Salisbury,
    Made suit to come in's presence; which if granted,
    As he made semblance of his duty, would
    Have put his knife to him.'
  • Henry VIII. I remember
    Of such a time: being my sworn servant,
    The duke retain'd him his. But on; what hence?

    Surveyor. 'If,' quoth he, 'I for this had been committed,
    As, to the Tower, I thought, I would have play'd
    The part my father meant to act upon
    The usurper Richard; who, being at Salisbury,
    Made suit to come in's presence; which if granted,
    As he made semblance of his duty, would
    Have put his knife to him.'

9 I / 2
  • After 'the duke his father,' with 'the knife,'
    He stretch'd him, and, with o...
  • After 'the duke his father,' with 'the knife,'
    He stretch'd him, and, with one hand on his dagger,
    Another spread on's breast, mounting his eyes
    He did discharge a horrible oath; whose tenor
    Was,--were he evil used, he would outgo
    His father by as much as a performance
    Does an irresolute purpose.
  • Henry VIII. There's something more would out of thee; what say'st?

    Surveyor. After 'the duke his father,' with 'the knife,'
    He stretch'd him, and, with one hand on his dagger,
    Another spread on's breast, mounting his eyes
    He did discharge a horrible oath; whose tenor
    Was,--were he evil used, he would outgo
    His father by as much as a performance
    Does an irresolute purpose.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

shakespeare_network

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.