Speeches (Lines) for Tamora in "Titus Andronicus"

Total: 49
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 1
  • Stay, Roman brethren! Gracious conqueror,
    Victorious Titus, rue the tears I...
  • Stay, Roman brethren! Gracious conqueror,
    Victorious Titus, rue the tears I shed,
    A mother's tears in passion for her son:
    And if thy sons were ever dear to thee,
    O, think my son to be as dear to me!
    Sufficeth not that we are brought to Rome,
    To beautify thy triumphs and return,
    Captive to thee and to thy Roman yoke,
    But must my sons be slaughter'd in the streets,
    For valiant doings in their country's cause?
    O, if to fight for king and commonweal
    Were piety in thine, it is in these.
    Andronicus, stain not thy tomb with blood:
    Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods?
    Draw near them then in being merciful:
    Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge:
    Thrice noble Titus, spare my first-born son.
  • Titus Andronicus. I give him you, the noblest that survives,
    The eldest son of this distressed queen.

    Tamora. Stay, Roman brethren! Gracious conqueror,
    Victorious Titus, rue the tears I shed,
    A mother's tears in passion for her son:
    And if thy sons were ever dear to thee,
    O, think my son to be as dear to me!
    Sufficeth not that we are brought to Rome,
    To beautify thy triumphs and return,
    Captive to thee and to thy Roman yoke,
    But must my sons be slaughter'd in the streets,
    For valiant doings in their country's cause?
    O, if to fight for king and commonweal
    Were piety in thine, it is in these.
    Andronicus, stain not thy tomb with blood:
    Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods?
    Draw near them then in being merciful:
    Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge:
    Thrice noble Titus, spare my first-born son.

2 I / 1
  • O cruel, irreligious piety!
  • O cruel, irreligious piety!
  • Lucius. Away with him! and make a fire straight;
    And with our swords, upon a pile of wood,
    Let's hew his limbs till they be clean consumed.

    Tamora. O cruel, irreligious piety!

3 I / 1
  • And here, in sight of heaven, to Rome I swear,
    If Saturnine advance the Quee...
  • And here, in sight of heaven, to Rome I swear,
    If Saturnine advance the Queen of Goths,
    She will a handmaid be to his desires,
    A loving nurse, a mother to his youth.
  • Saturninus. And therefore, lovely Tamora, queen of Goths,
    That like the stately Phoebe 'mongst her nymphs
    Dost overshine the gallant'st dames of Rome,
    If thou be pleased with this my sudden choice,
    Behold, I choose thee, Tamora, for my bride,
    And will create thee empress of Rome,
    Speak, Queen of Goths, dost thou applaud my choice?
    And here I swear by all the Roman gods,
    Sith priest and holy water are so near
    And tapers burn so bright and every thing
    In readiness for Hymenaeus stand,
    I will not re-salute the streets of Rome,
    Or climb my palace, till from forth this place
    I lead espoused my bride along with me.

    Tamora. And here, in sight of heaven, to Rome I swear,
    If Saturnine advance the Queen of Goths,
    She will a handmaid be to his desires,
    A loving nurse, a mother to his youth.

4 I / 1
  • My worthy lord, if ever Tamora
    Were gracious in those princely eyes of thine...
  • My worthy lord, if ever Tamora
    Were gracious in those princely eyes of thine,
    Then hear me speak in indifferently for all;
    And at my suit, sweet, pardon what is past.
  • Titus Andronicus. Prince Bassianus, leave to plead my deeds:
    'Tis thou and those that have dishonour'd me.
    Rome and the righteous heavens be my judge,
    How I have loved and honour'd Saturnine!

    Tamora. My worthy lord, if ever Tamora
    Were gracious in those princely eyes of thine,
    Then hear me speak in indifferently for all;
    And at my suit, sweet, pardon what is past.

5 I / 1
  • Not so, my lord; the gods of Rome forfend
    I should be author to dishonour yo...
  • Not so, my lord; the gods of Rome forfend
    I should be author to dishonour you!
    But on mine honour dare I undertake
    For good Lord Titus' innocence in all;
    Whose fury not dissembled speaks his griefs:
    Then, at my suit, look graciously on him;
    Lose not so noble a friend on vain suppose,
    Nor with sour looks afflict his gentle heart.
    [Aside to SATURNINUS] My lord, be ruled by me,]
    be won at last;
    Dissemble all your griefs and discontents:
    You are but newly planted in your throne;
    Lest, then, the people, and patricians too,
    Upon a just survey, take Titus' part,
    And so supplant you for ingratitude,
    Which Rome reputes to be a heinous sin,
    Yield at entreats; and then let me alone:
    I'll find a day to massacre them all
    And raze their faction and their family,
    The cruel father and his traitorous sons,
    To whom I sued for my dear son's life,
    And make them know what 'tis to let a queen
    Kneel in the streets and beg for grace in vain.
    [Aloud]
    Come, come, sweet emperor; come, Andronicus;
    Take up this good old man, and cheer the heart
    That dies in tempest of thy angry frown.
  • Saturninus. What, madam! be dishonour'd openly,
    And basely put it up without revenge?

    Tamora. Not so, my lord; the gods of Rome forfend
    I should be author to dishonour you!
    But on mine honour dare I undertake
    For good Lord Titus' innocence in all;
    Whose fury not dissembled speaks his griefs:
    Then, at my suit, look graciously on him;
    Lose not so noble a friend on vain suppose,
    Nor with sour looks afflict his gentle heart.
    [Aside to SATURNINUS] My lord, be ruled by me,]
    be won at last;
    Dissemble all your griefs and discontents:
    You are but newly planted in your throne;
    Lest, then, the people, and patricians too,
    Upon a just survey, take Titus' part,
    And so supplant you for ingratitude,
    Which Rome reputes to be a heinous sin,
    Yield at entreats; and then let me alone:
    I'll find a day to massacre them all
    And raze their faction and their family,
    The cruel father and his traitorous sons,
    To whom I sued for my dear son's life,
    And make them know what 'tis to let a queen
    Kneel in the streets and beg for grace in vain.
    [Aloud]
    Come, come, sweet emperor; come, Andronicus;
    Take up this good old man, and cheer the heart
    That dies in tempest of thy angry frown.

6 I / 1
  • Titus, I am incorporate in Rome,
    A Roman now adopted happily,
    And must a...
  • Titus, I am incorporate in Rome,
    A Roman now adopted happily,
    And must advise the emperor for his good.
    This day all quarrels die, Andronicus;
    And let it be mine honour, good my lord,
    That I have reconciled your friends and you.
    For you, Prince Bassianus, I have pass'd
    My word and promise to the emperor,
    That you will be more mild and tractable.
    And fear not lords, and you, Lavinia;
    By my advice, all humbled on your knees,
    You shall ask pardon of his majesty.
  • Titus Andronicus. I thank your majesty, and her, my lord:
    These words, these looks, infuse new life in me.

    Tamora. Titus, I am incorporate in Rome,
    A Roman now adopted happily,
    And must advise the emperor for his good.
    This day all quarrels die, Andronicus;
    And let it be mine honour, good my lord,
    That I have reconciled your friends and you.
    For you, Prince Bassianus, I have pass'd
    My word and promise to the emperor,
    That you will be more mild and tractable.
    And fear not lords, and you, Lavinia;
    By my advice, all humbled on your knees,
    You shall ask pardon of his majesty.

7 I / 1
  • Nay, nay, sweet emperor, we must all be friends:
    The tribune and his nephews...
  • Nay, nay, sweet emperor, we must all be friends:
    The tribune and his nephews kneel for grace;
    I will not be denied: sweet heart, look back.
  • Saturninus. Away, and talk not; trouble us no more.

    Tamora. Nay, nay, sweet emperor, we must all be friends:
    The tribune and his nephews kneel for grace;
    I will not be denied: sweet heart, look back.

8 II / 3
  • My lovely Aaron, wherefore look'st thou sad,
    When every thing doth make a gl...
  • My lovely Aaron, wherefore look'st thou sad,
    When every thing doth make a gleeful boast?
    The birds chant melody on every bush,
    The snake lies rolled in the cheerful sun,
    The green leaves quiver with the cooling wind
    And make a chequer'd shadow on the ground:
    Under their sweet shade, Aaron, let us sit,
    And, whilst the babbling echo mocks the hounds,
    Replying shrilly to the well-tuned horns,
    As if a double hunt were heard at once,
    Let us sit down and mark their yelping noise;
    And, after conflict such as was supposed
    The wandering prince and Dido once enjoy'd,
    When with a happy storm they were surprised
    And curtain'd with a counsel-keeping cave,
    We may, each wreathed in the other's arms,
    Our pastimes done, possess a golden slumber;
    Whiles hounds and horns and sweet melodious birds
    Be unto us as is a nurse's song
    Of lullaby to bring her babe asleep.
  • Aaron. He that had wit would think that I had none,
    To bury so much gold under a tree,
    And never after to inherit it.
    Let him that thinks of me so abjectly
    Know that this gold must coin a stratagem,
    Which, cunningly effected, will beget
    A very excellent piece of villany:
    And so repose, sweet gold, for their unrest
    [Hides the gold]
    That have their alms out of the empress' chest.

    Tamora. My lovely Aaron, wherefore look'st thou sad,
    When every thing doth make a gleeful boast?
    The birds chant melody on every bush,
    The snake lies rolled in the cheerful sun,
    The green leaves quiver with the cooling wind
    And make a chequer'd shadow on the ground:
    Under their sweet shade, Aaron, let us sit,
    And, whilst the babbling echo mocks the hounds,
    Replying shrilly to the well-tuned horns,
    As if a double hunt were heard at once,
    Let us sit down and mark their yelping noise;
    And, after conflict such as was supposed
    The wandering prince and Dido once enjoy'd,
    When with a happy storm they were surprised
    And curtain'd with a counsel-keeping cave,
    We may, each wreathed in the other's arms,
    Our pastimes done, possess a golden slumber;
    Whiles hounds and horns and sweet melodious birds
    Be unto us as is a nurse's song
    Of lullaby to bring her babe asleep.

9 II / 3
  • Ah, my sweet Moor, sweeter to me than life!
  • Ah, my sweet Moor, sweeter to me than life!
  • Aaron. Madam, though Venus govern your desires,
    Saturn is dominator over mine:
    What signifies my deadly-standing eye,
    My silence and my cloudy melancholy,
    My fleece of woolly hair that now uncurls
    Even as an adder when she doth unroll
    To do some fatal execution?
    No, madam, these are no venereal signs:
    Vengeance is in my heart, death in my hand,
    Blood and revenge are hammering in my head.
    Hark Tamora, the empress of my soul,
    Which never hopes more heaven than rests in thee,
    This is the day of doom for Bassianus:
    His Philomel must lose her tongue to-day,
    Thy sons make pillage of her chastity
    And wash their hands in Bassianus' blood.
    Seest thou this letter? take it up, I pray thee,
    And give the king this fatal plotted scroll.
    Now question me no more; we are espied;
    Here comes a parcel of our hopeful booty,
    Which dreads not yet their lives' destruction.

    Tamora. Ah, my sweet Moor, sweeter to me than life!

10 II / 3
  • Saucy controller of our private steps!
    Had I the power that some say Dian ha...
  • Saucy controller of our private steps!
    Had I the power that some say Dian had,
    Thy temples should be planted presently
    With horns, as was Actaeon's; and the hounds
    Should drive upon thy new-transformed limbs,
    Unmannerly intruder as thou art!
  • Bassianus. Who have we here? Rome's royal empress,
    Unfurnish'd of her well-beseeming troop?
    Or is it Dian, habited like her,
    Who hath abandoned her holy groves
    To see the general hunting in this forest?

    Tamora. Saucy controller of our private steps!
    Had I the power that some say Dian had,
    Thy temples should be planted presently
    With horns, as was Actaeon's; and the hounds
    Should drive upon thy new-transformed limbs,
    Unmannerly intruder as thou art!

11 II / 3
  • Why have I patience to endure all this?
  • Why have I patience to endure all this?
  • Lavinia. Ay, for these slips have made him noted long:
    Good king, to be so mightily abused!

    Tamora. Why have I patience to endure all this?

12 II / 3
  • Have I not reason, think you, to look pale?
    These two have 'ticed me hither...
  • Have I not reason, think you, to look pale?
    These two have 'ticed me hither to this place:
    A barren detested vale, you see it is;
    The trees, though summer, yet forlorn and lean,
    O'ercome with moss and baleful mistletoe:
    Here never shines the sun; here nothing breeds,
    Unless the nightly owl or fatal raven:
    And when they show'd me this abhorred pit,
    They told me, here, at dead time of the night,
    A thousand fiends, a thousand hissing snakes,
    Ten thousand swelling toads, as many urchins,
    Would make such fearful and confused cries
    As any mortal body hearing it
    Should straight fall mad, or else die suddenly.
    No sooner had they told this hellish tale,
    But straight they told me they would bind me here
    Unto the body of a dismal yew,
    And leave me to this miserable death:
    And then they call'd me foul adulteress,
    Lascivious Goth, and all the bitterest terms
    That ever ear did hear to such effect:
    And, had you not by wondrous fortune come,
    This vengeance on me had they executed.
    Revenge it, as you love your mother's life,
    Or be ye not henceforth call'd my children.
  • Demetrius. How now, dear sovereign, and our gracious mother!
    Why doth your highness look so pale and wan?

    Tamora. Have I not reason, think you, to look pale?
    These two have 'ticed me hither to this place:
    A barren detested vale, you see it is;
    The trees, though summer, yet forlorn and lean,
    O'ercome with moss and baleful mistletoe:
    Here never shines the sun; here nothing breeds,
    Unless the nightly owl or fatal raven:
    And when they show'd me this abhorred pit,
    They told me, here, at dead time of the night,
    A thousand fiends, a thousand hissing snakes,
    Ten thousand swelling toads, as many urchins,
    Would make such fearful and confused cries
    As any mortal body hearing it
    Should straight fall mad, or else die suddenly.
    No sooner had they told this hellish tale,
    But straight they told me they would bind me here
    Unto the body of a dismal yew,
    And leave me to this miserable death:
    And then they call'd me foul adulteress,
    Lascivious Goth, and all the bitterest terms
    That ever ear did hear to such effect:
    And, had you not by wondrous fortune come,
    This vengeance on me had they executed.
    Revenge it, as you love your mother's life,
    Or be ye not henceforth call'd my children.

13 II / 3
  • Give me thy poniard; you shall know, my boys
    Your mother's hand shall right...
  • Give me thy poniard; you shall know, my boys
    Your mother's hand shall right your mother's wrong.
  • Lavinia. Ay, come, Semiramis, nay, barbarous Tamora,
    For no name fits thy nature but thy own!

    Tamora. Give me thy poniard; you shall know, my boys
    Your mother's hand shall right your mother's wrong.

14 II / 3
  • But when ye have the honey ye desire,
    Let not this wasp outlive, us both to...
  • But when ye have the honey ye desire,
    Let not this wasp outlive, us both to sting.
  • Chiron. An if she do, I would I were an eunuch.
    Drag hence her husband to some secret hole,
    And make his dead trunk pillow to our lust.

    Tamora. But when ye have the honey ye desire,
    Let not this wasp outlive, us both to sting.

15 II / 3
  • I will not hear her speak; away with her!
  • I will not hear her speak; away with her!
  • Lavinia. O Tamora! thou bear'st a woman's face,--

    Tamora. I will not hear her speak; away with her!

16 II / 3
  • I know not what it means; away with her!
  • I know not what it means; away with her!
  • Lavinia. 'Tis true; the raven doth not hatch a lark:
    Yet have I heard,--O, could I find it now!--
    The lion moved with pity did endure
    To have his princely paws pared all away:
    Some say that ravens foster forlorn children,
    The whilst their own birds famish in their nests:
    O, be to me, though thy hard heart say no,
    Nothing so kind, but something pitiful!

    Tamora. I know not what it means; away with her!

17 II / 3
  • Hadst thou in person ne'er offended me,
    Even for his sake am I pitiless.
  • Hadst thou in person ne'er offended me,
    Even for his sake am I pitiless.
    Remember, boys, I pour'd forth tears in vain,
    To save your brother from the sacrifice;
    But fierce Andronicus would not relent;
    Therefore, away with her, and use her as you will,
    The worse to her, the better loved of me.
  • Lavinia. O, let me teach thee! for my father's sake,
    That gave thee life, when well he might have
    slain thee,
    Be not obdurate, open thy deaf ears.

    Tamora. Hadst thou in person ne'er offended me,
    Even for his sake am I pitiless.
    Remember, boys, I pour'd forth tears in vain,
    To save your brother from the sacrifice;
    But fierce Andronicus would not relent;
    Therefore, away with her, and use her as you will,
    The worse to her, the better loved of me.

18 II / 3
  • What begg'st thou, then? fond woman, let me go.
  • What begg'st thou, then? fond woman, let me go.
  • Lavinia. O Tamora, be call'd a gentle queen,
    And with thine own hands kill me in this place!
    For 'tis not life that I have begg'd so long;
    Poor I was slain when Bassianus died.

    Tamora. What begg'st thou, then? fond woman, let me go.

19 II / 3
  • So should I rob my sweet sons of their fee:
    No, let them satisfy their lust...
  • So should I rob my sweet sons of their fee:
    No, let them satisfy their lust on thee.
  • Lavinia. 'Tis present death I beg; and one thing more
    That womanhood denies my tongue to tell:
    O, keep me from their worse than killing lust,
    And tumble me into some loathsome pit,
    Where never man's eye may behold my body:
    Do this, and be a charitable murderer.

    Tamora. So should I rob my sweet sons of their fee:
    No, let them satisfy their lust on thee.

20 II / 3
  • Farewell, my sons: see that you make her sure.
    Ne'er let my heart know merry...
  • Farewell, my sons: see that you make her sure.
    Ne'er let my heart know merry cheer indeed,
    Till all the Andronici be made away.
    Now will I hence to seek my lovely Moor,
    And let my spleenful sons this trull deflow'r.
  • Chiron. Nay, then I'll stop your mouth. Bring thou her husband:
    This is the hole where Aaron bid us hide him.
    [DEMETRIUS throws the body of BASSIANUS into the]
    pit; then exeunt DEMETRIUS and CHIRON, dragging
    off LAVINIA]

    Tamora. Farewell, my sons: see that you make her sure.
    Ne'er let my heart know merry cheer indeed,
    Till all the Andronici be made away.
    Now will I hence to seek my lovely Moor,
    And let my spleenful sons this trull deflow'r.

21 II / 3
  • Where is my lord the king?
  • Where is my lord the king?
  • Martius. We know not where you left him all alive;
    But, out, alas! here have we found him dead.
    [Re-enter TAMORA, with Attendants; TITUS]
    ANDRONICUS, and Lucius]

    Tamora. Where is my lord the king?

22 II / 3
  • Where is thy brother Bassianus?
  • Where is thy brother Bassianus?
  • Saturninus. Here, Tamora, though grieved with killing grief.

    Tamora. Where is thy brother Bassianus?

23 II / 3
  • Then all too late I bring this fatal writ,
    The complot of this timeless trag...
  • Then all too late I bring this fatal writ,
    The complot of this timeless tragedy;
    And wonder greatly that man's face can fold
    In pleasing smiles such murderous tyranny.
  • Saturninus. Now to the bottom dost thou search my wound:
    Poor Bassianus here lies murdered.

    Tamora. Then all too late I bring this fatal writ,
    The complot of this timeless tragedy;
    And wonder greatly that man's face can fold
    In pleasing smiles such murderous tyranny.

24 II / 3
  • What, are they in this pit? O wondrous thing!
    How easily murder is discovere...
  • What, are they in this pit? O wondrous thing!
    How easily murder is discovered!
  • Saturninus. [To TITUS] Two of thy whelps, fell curs of
    bloody kind,
    Have here bereft my brother of his life.
    Sirs, drag them from the pit unto the prison:
    There let them bide until we have devised
    Some never-heard-of torturing pain for them.

    Tamora. What, are they in this pit? O wondrous thing!
    How easily murder is discovered!

25 II / 3
  • Andronicus himself did take it up.
  • Andronicus himself did take it up.
  • Saturninus. If it be proved! you see it is apparent.
    Who found this letter? Tamora, was it you?

    Tamora. Andronicus himself did take it up.

26 II / 3
  • Andronicus, I will entreat the king;
    Fear not thy sons; they shall do well e...
  • Andronicus, I will entreat the king;
    Fear not thy sons; they shall do well enough.
  • Saturninus. Thou shalt not bail them: see thou follow me.
    Some bring the murder'd body, some the murderers:
    Let them not speak a word; the guilt is plain;
    For, by my soul, were there worse end than death,
    That end upon them should be executed.

    Tamora. Andronicus, I will entreat the king;
    Fear not thy sons; they shall do well enough.

27 IV / 4
  • My gracious lord, my lovely Saturnine,
    Lord of my life, commander of my thou...
  • My gracious lord, my lovely Saturnine,
    Lord of my life, commander of my thoughts,
    Calm thee, and bear the faults of Titus' age,
    The effects of sorrow for his valiant sons,
    Whose loss hath pierced him deep and scarr'd his heart;
    And rather comfort his distressed plight
    Than prosecute the meanest or the best
    For these contempts.
    [Aside]
    Why, thus it shall become
    High-witted Tamora to gloze with all:
    But, Titus, I have touched thee to the quick,
    Thy life-blood out: if Aaron now be wise,
    Then is all safe, the anchor's in the port.
    [Enter Clown]
    How now, good fellow! wouldst thou speak with us?
  • Saturninus. Why, lords, what wrongs are these! was ever seen
    An emperor in Rome thus overborne,
    Troubled, confronted thus; and, for the extent
    Of egal justice, used in such contempt?
    My lords, you know, as know the mightful gods,
    However these disturbers of our peace
    Buz in the people's ears, there nought hath pass'd,
    But even with law, against the willful sons
    Of old Andronicus. And what an if
    His sorrows have so overwhelm'd his wits,
    Shall we be thus afflicted in his wreaks,
    His fits, his frenzy, and his bitterness?
    And now he writes to heaven for his redress:
    See, here's to Jove, and this to Mercury;
    This to Apollo; this to the god of war;
    Sweet scrolls to fly about the streets of Rome!
    What's this but libelling against the senate,
    And blazoning our injustice every where?
    A goodly humour, is it not, my lords?
    As who would say, in Rome no justice were.
    But if I live, his feigned ecstasies
    Shall be no shelter to these outrages:
    But he and his shall know that justice lives
    In Saturninus' health, whom, if she sleep,
    He'll so awake as she in fury shall
    Cut off the proud'st conspirator that lives.

    Tamora. My gracious lord, my lovely Saturnine,
    Lord of my life, commander of my thoughts,
    Calm thee, and bear the faults of Titus' age,
    The effects of sorrow for his valiant sons,
    Whose loss hath pierced him deep and scarr'd his heart;
    And rather comfort his distressed plight
    Than prosecute the meanest or the best
    For these contempts.
    [Aside]
    Why, thus it shall become
    High-witted Tamora to gloze with all:
    But, Titus, I have touched thee to the quick,
    Thy life-blood out: if Aaron now be wise,
    Then is all safe, the anchor's in the port.
    [Enter Clown]
    How now, good fellow! wouldst thou speak with us?

28 IV / 4
  • Empress I am, but yonder sits the emperor.
  • Empress I am, but yonder sits the emperor.
  • Clown. Yea, forsooth, an your mistership be emperial.

    Tamora. Empress I am, but yonder sits the emperor.

29 IV / 4
  • Come, sirrah, you must be hanged.
  • Come, sirrah, you must be hanged.
  • Clown. How much money must I have?

    Tamora. Come, sirrah, you must be hanged.

30 IV / 4
  • Why should you fear? is not your city strong?
  • Why should you fear? is not your city strong?
  • Saturninus. Is warlike Lucius general of the Goths?
    These tidings nip me, and I hang the head
    As flowers with frost or grass beat down with storms:
    Ay, now begin our sorrows to approach:
    'Tis he the common people love so much;
    Myself hath often over-heard them say,
    When I have walked like a private man,
    That Lucius' banishment was wrongfully,
    And they have wish'd that Lucius were their emperor.

    Tamora. Why should you fear? is not your city strong?

31 IV / 4
  • King, be thy thoughts imperious, like thy name.
    Is the sun dimm'd, that gnat...
  • King, be thy thoughts imperious, like thy name.
    Is the sun dimm'd, that gnats do fly in it?
    The eagle suffers little birds to sing,
    And is not careful what they mean thereby,
    Knowing that with the shadow of his wings
    He can at pleasure stint their melody:
    Even so mayst thou the giddy men of Rome.
    Then cheer thy spirit : for know, thou emperor,
    I will enchant the old Andronicus
    With words more sweet, and yet more dangerous,
    Than baits to fish, or honey-stalks to sheep,
    When as the one is wounded with the bait,
    The other rotted with delicious feed.
  • Saturninus. Ay, but the citizens favor Lucius,
    And will revolt from me to succor him.

    Tamora. King, be thy thoughts imperious, like thy name.
    Is the sun dimm'd, that gnats do fly in it?
    The eagle suffers little birds to sing,
    And is not careful what they mean thereby,
    Knowing that with the shadow of his wings
    He can at pleasure stint their melody:
    Even so mayst thou the giddy men of Rome.
    Then cheer thy spirit : for know, thou emperor,
    I will enchant the old Andronicus
    With words more sweet, and yet more dangerous,
    Than baits to fish, or honey-stalks to sheep,
    When as the one is wounded with the bait,
    The other rotted with delicious feed.

32 IV / 4
  • If Tamora entreat him, then he will:
    For I can smooth and fill his aged ear...
  • If Tamora entreat him, then he will:
    For I can smooth and fill his aged ear
    With golden promises; that, were his heart
    Almost impregnable, his old ears deaf,
    Yet should both ear and heart obey my tongue.
    [To AEmilius]
    Go thou before, be our ambassador:
    Say that the emperor requests a parley
    Of warlike Lucius, and appoint the meeting
    Even at his father's house, the old Andronicus.
  • Saturninus. But he will not entreat his son for us.

    Tamora. If Tamora entreat him, then he will:
    For I can smooth and fill his aged ear
    With golden promises; that, were his heart
    Almost impregnable, his old ears deaf,
    Yet should both ear and heart obey my tongue.
    [To AEmilius]
    Go thou before, be our ambassador:
    Say that the emperor requests a parley
    Of warlike Lucius, and appoint the meeting
    Even at his father's house, the old Andronicus.

33 IV / 4
  • Now will I to that old Andronicus;
    And temper him with all the art I have, <...
  • Now will I to that old Andronicus;
    And temper him with all the art I have,
    To pluck proud Lucius from the warlike Goths.
    And now, sweet emperor, be blithe again,
    And bury all thy fear in my devices.
  • Aemilius. Your bidding shall I do effectually.

    Tamora. Now will I to that old Andronicus;
    And temper him with all the art I have,
    To pluck proud Lucius from the warlike Goths.
    And now, sweet emperor, be blithe again,
    And bury all thy fear in my devices.

34 V / 2
  • Thus, in this strange and sad habiliment,
    I will encounter with Andronicus,...
  • Thus, in this strange and sad habiliment,
    I will encounter with Andronicus,
    And say I am Revenge, sent from below
    To join with him and right his heinous wrongs.
    Knock at his study, where, they say, he keeps,
    To ruminate strange plots of dire revenge;
    Tell him Revenge is come to join with him,
    And work confusion on his enemies.
  • Lucius. AEmilius, let the emperor give his pledges
    Unto my father and my uncle Marcus,
    And we will come. March away.

    Tamora. Thus, in this strange and sad habiliment,
    I will encounter with Andronicus,
    And say I am Revenge, sent from below
    To join with him and right his heinous wrongs.
    Knock at his study, where, they say, he keeps,
    To ruminate strange plots of dire revenge;
    Tell him Revenge is come to join with him,
    And work confusion on his enemies.

35 V / 2
  • Titus, I am come to talk with thee.
  • Titus, I am come to talk with thee.
  • Titus Andronicus. Who doth molest my contemplation?
    Is it your trick to make me ope the door,
    That so my sad decrees may fly away,
    And all my study be to no effect?
    You are deceived: for what I mean to do
    See here in bloody lines I have set down;
    And what is written shall be executed.

    Tamora. Titus, I am come to talk with thee.

36 V / 2
  • If thou didst know me, thou wouldest talk with me.
  • If thou didst know me, thou wouldest talk with me.
  • Titus Andronicus. No, not a word; how can I grace my talk,
    Wanting a hand to give it action?
    Thou hast the odds of me; therefore no more.

    Tamora. If thou didst know me, thou wouldest talk with me.

37 V / 2
  • Know, thou sad man, I am not Tamora;
    She is thy enemy, and I thy friend:
  • Know, thou sad man, I am not Tamora;
    She is thy enemy, and I thy friend:
    I am Revenge: sent from the infernal kingdom,
    To ease the gnawing vulture of thy mind,
    By working wreakful vengeance on thy foes.
    Come down, and welcome me to this world's light;
    Confer with me of murder and of death:
    There's not a hollow cave or lurking-place,
    No vast obscurity or misty vale,
    Where bloody murder or detested rape
    Can couch for fear, but I will find them out;
    And in their ears tell them my dreadful name,
    Revenge, which makes the foul offender quake.
  • Titus Andronicus. I am not mad; I know thee well enough:
    Witness this wretched stump, witness these crimson lines;
    Witness these trenches made by grief and care,
    Witness the tiring day and heavy night;
    Witness all sorrow, that I know thee well
    For our proud empress, mighty Tamora:
    Is not thy coming for my other hand?

    Tamora. Know, thou sad man, I am not Tamora;
    She is thy enemy, and I thy friend:
    I am Revenge: sent from the infernal kingdom,
    To ease the gnawing vulture of thy mind,
    By working wreakful vengeance on thy foes.
    Come down, and welcome me to this world's light;
    Confer with me of murder and of death:
    There's not a hollow cave or lurking-place,
    No vast obscurity or misty vale,
    Where bloody murder or detested rape
    Can couch for fear, but I will find them out;
    And in their ears tell them my dreadful name,
    Revenge, which makes the foul offender quake.

38 V / 2
  • I am; therefore come down, and welcome me.
  • I am; therefore come down, and welcome me.
  • Titus Andronicus. Art thou Revenge? and art thou sent to me,
    To be a torment to mine enemies?

    Tamora. I am; therefore come down, and welcome me.

39 V / 2
  • These are my ministers, and come with me.
  • These are my ministers, and come with me.
  • Titus Andronicus. Do me some service, ere I come to thee.
    Lo, by thy side where Rape and Murder stands;
    Now give me some surance that thou art Revenge,
    Stab them, or tear them on thy chariot-wheels;
    And then I'll come and be thy waggoner,
    And whirl along with thee about the globe.
    Provide thee two proper palfreys, black as jet,
    To hale thy vengeful waggon swift away,
    And find out murderers in their guilty caves:
    And when thy car is loaden with their heads,
    I will dismount, and by the waggon-wheel
    Trot, like a servile footman, all day long,
    Even from Hyperion's rising in the east
    Until his very downfall in the sea:
    And day by day I'll do this heavy task,
    So thou destroy Rapine and Murder there.

    Tamora. These are my ministers, and come with me.

40 V / 2
  • Rapine and Murder; therefore called so,
    Cause they take vengeance of such ki...
  • Rapine and Murder; therefore called so,
    Cause they take vengeance of such kind of men.
  • Titus Andronicus. Are these thy ministers? what are they call'd?

    Tamora. Rapine and Murder; therefore called so,
    Cause they take vengeance of such kind of men.

41 V / 2
  • This closing with him fits his lunacy
    Whate'er I forge to feed his brain-sic...
  • This closing with him fits his lunacy
    Whate'er I forge to feed his brain-sick fits,
    Do you uphold and maintain in your speeches,
    For now he firmly takes me for Revenge;
    And, being credulous in this mad thought,
    I'll make him send for Lucius his son;
    And, whilst I at a banquet hold him sure,
    I'll find some cunning practise out of hand,
    To scatter and disperse the giddy Goths,
    Or, at the least, make them his enemies.
    See, here he comes, and I must ply my theme.
  • Titus Andronicus. Good Lord, how like the empress' sons they are!
    And you, the empress! but we worldly men
    Have miserable, mad, mistaking eyes.
    O sweet Revenge, now do I come to thee;
    And, if one arm's embracement will content thee,
    I will embrace thee in it by and by.

    Tamora. This closing with him fits his lunacy
    Whate'er I forge to feed his brain-sick fits,
    Do you uphold and maintain in your speeches,
    For now he firmly takes me for Revenge;
    And, being credulous in this mad thought,
    I'll make him send for Lucius his son;
    And, whilst I at a banquet hold him sure,
    I'll find some cunning practise out of hand,
    To scatter and disperse the giddy Goths,
    Or, at the least, make them his enemies.
    See, here he comes, and I must ply my theme.

42 V / 2
  • What wouldst thou have us do, Andronicus?
  • What wouldst thou have us do, Andronicus?
  • Titus Andronicus. Long have I been forlorn, and all for thee:
    Welcome, dread Fury, to my woful house:
    Rapine and Murder, you are welcome too.
    How like the empress and her sons you are!
    Well are you fitted, had you but a Moor:
    Could not all hell afford you such a devil?
    For well I wot the empress never wags
    But in her company there is a Moor;
    And, would you represent our queen aright,
    It were convenient you had such a devil:
    But welcome, as you are. What shall we do?

    Tamora. What wouldst thou have us do, Andronicus?

43 V / 2
  • Show me a thousand that have done thee wrong,
    And I will be revenged on them...
  • Show me a thousand that have done thee wrong,
    And I will be revenged on them all.
  • Chiron. Show me a villain that hath done a rape,
    And I am sent to be revenged on him.

    Tamora. Show me a thousand that have done thee wrong,
    And I will be revenged on them all.

44 V / 2
  • Well hast thou lesson'd us; this shall we do.
    But would it please thee, good...
  • Well hast thou lesson'd us; this shall we do.
    But would it please thee, good Andronicus,
    To send for Lucius, thy thrice-valiant son,
    Who leads towards Rome a band of warlike Goths,
    And bid him come and banquet at thy house;
    When he is here, even at thy solemn feast,
    I will bring in the empress and her sons,
    The emperor himself and all thy foes;
    And at thy mercy shalt they stoop and kneel,
    And on them shalt thou ease thy angry heart.
    What says Andronicus to this device?
  • Titus Andronicus. Look round about the wicked streets of Rome;
    And when thou find'st a man that's like thyself.
    Good Murder, stab him; he's a murderer.
    Go thou with him; and when it is thy hap
    To find another that is like to thee,
    Good Rapine, stab him; he's a ravisher.
    Go thou with them; and in the emperor's court
    There is a queen, attended by a Moor;
    Well mayst thou know her by thy own proportion,
    for up and down she doth resemble thee:
    I pray thee, do on them some violent death;
    They have been violent to me and mine.

    Tamora. Well hast thou lesson'd us; this shall we do.
    But would it please thee, good Andronicus,
    To send for Lucius, thy thrice-valiant son,
    Who leads towards Rome a band of warlike Goths,
    And bid him come and banquet at thy house;
    When he is here, even at thy solemn feast,
    I will bring in the empress and her sons,
    The emperor himself and all thy foes;
    And at thy mercy shalt they stoop and kneel,
    And on them shalt thou ease thy angry heart.
    What says Andronicus to this device?

45 V / 2
  • Now will I hence about thy business,
    And take my ministers along with me.
  • Now will I hence about thy business,
    And take my ministers along with me.
  • Marcus Andronicus. This will I do, and soon return again.

    Tamora. Now will I hence about thy business,
    And take my ministers along with me.

46 V / 2
  • [Aside to her sons] What say you, boys? will you
    bide with him,
    Whiles I...
  • [Aside to her sons] What say you, boys? will you
    bide with him,
    Whiles I go tell my lord the emperor
    How I have govern'd our determined jest?
    Yield to his humour, smooth and speak him fair,
    And tarry with him till I turn again.
  • Titus Andronicus. Nay, nay, let Rape and Murder stay with me;
    Or else I'll call my brother back again,
    And cleave to no revenge but Lucius.

    Tamora. [Aside to her sons] What say you, boys? will you
    bide with him,
    Whiles I go tell my lord the emperor
    How I have govern'd our determined jest?
    Yield to his humour, smooth and speak him fair,
    And tarry with him till I turn again.

47 V / 2
  • Farewell, Andronicus: Revenge now goes
    To lay a complot to betray thy foes.
  • Farewell, Andronicus: Revenge now goes
    To lay a complot to betray thy foes.
  • Demetrius. Madam, depart at pleasure; leave us here.

    Tamora. Farewell, Andronicus: Revenge now goes
    To lay a complot to betray thy foes.

48 V / 3
  • We are beholding to you, good Andronicus.
  • We are beholding to you, good Andronicus.
  • Titus Andronicus. Because I would be sure to have all well,
    To entertain your highness and your empress.

    Tamora. We are beholding to you, good Andronicus.

49 V / 3
  • Why hast thou slain thine only daughter thus?
  • Why hast thou slain thine only daughter thus?
  • Titus Andronicus. Will't please you eat? will't please your
    highness feed?

    Tamora. Why hast thou slain thine only daughter thus?

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.