Speeches (Lines) for Third Servingman in "The Tragedy of Coriolanus"

Total: 20
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 IV / 5
  • What fellow's this?
  • What fellow's this?
  • Second Servingman. Are you so brave? I'll have you talked with anon.

    Third Servingman. What fellow's this?

2 IV / 5
  • What have you to do here, fellow? Pray you, avoid
    the house.
  • What have you to do here, fellow? Pray you, avoid
    the house.
  • First Servingman. A strange one as ever I looked on: I cannot get him
    out of the house: prithee, call my master to him.

    Third Servingman. What have you to do here, fellow? Pray you, avoid
    the house.

3 IV / 5
  • What are you?
  • What are you?
  • Coriolanus. Let me but stand; I will not hurt your hearth.

    Third Servingman. What are you?

4 IV / 5
  • A marvellous poor one.
  • A marvellous poor one.
  • Coriolanus. A gentleman.

    Third Servingman. A marvellous poor one.

5 IV / 5
  • Pray you, poor gentleman, take up some other
    station; here's no place for yo...
  • Pray you, poor gentleman, take up some other
    station; here's no place for you; pray you, avoid: come.
  • Coriolanus. True, so I am.

    Third Servingman. Pray you, poor gentleman, take up some other
    station; here's no place for you; pray you, avoid: come.

6 IV / 5
  • What, you will not? Prithee, tell my master what a
    strange guest he has here...
  • What, you will not? Prithee, tell my master what a
    strange guest he has here.
  • Coriolanus. Follow your function, go, and batten on cold bits.

    Third Servingman. What, you will not? Prithee, tell my master what a
    strange guest he has here.

7 IV / 5
  • Where dwellest thou?
  • Where dwellest thou?
  • Second Servingman. And I shall.

    Third Servingman. Where dwellest thou?

8 IV / 5
  • Under the canopy!
  • Under the canopy!
  • Coriolanus. Under the canopy.

    Third Servingman. Under the canopy!

9 IV / 5
  • Where's that?
  • Where's that?
  • Coriolanus. Ay.

    Third Servingman. Where's that?

10 IV / 5
  • I' the city of kites and crows! What an ass it is!
    Then thou dwellest with d...
  • I' the city of kites and crows! What an ass it is!
    Then thou dwellest with daws too?
  • Coriolanus. I' the city of kites and crows.

    Third Servingman. I' the city of kites and crows! What an ass it is!
    Then thou dwellest with daws too?

11 IV / 5
  • How, sir! do you meddle with my master?
  • How, sir! do you meddle with my master?
  • Coriolanus. No, I serve not thy master.

    Third Servingman. How, sir! do you meddle with my master?

12 IV / 5
  • O slaves, I can tell you news,-- news, you rascals!
  • O slaves, I can tell you news,-- news, you rascals!
  • First Servingman. Ay, and for an assault too.

    Third Servingman. O slaves, I can tell you news,-- news, you rascals!

13 IV / 5
  • I would not be a Roman, of all nations; I had as
    lieve be a condemned man.
  • I would not be a Roman, of all nations; I had as
    lieve be a condemned man.
  • Second Servingman. [together] What, what, what? let's partake.

    Third Servingman. I would not be a Roman, of all nations; I had as
    lieve be a condemned man.

14 IV / 5
  • Why, here's he that was wont to thwack our general,
    Caius CORIOLANUS.
  • Why, here's he that was wont to thwack our general,
    Caius CORIOLANUS.
  • Second Servingman. [together] wherefore?

    Third Servingman. Why, here's he that was wont to thwack our general,
    Caius CORIOLANUS.

15 IV / 5
  • I do not say 'thwack our general;' but he was always
    good enough for him.
  • I do not say 'thwack our general;' but he was always
    good enough for him.
  • First Servingman. Why do you say 'thwack our general '?

    Third Servingman. I do not say 'thwack our general;' but he was always
    good enough for him.

16 IV / 5
  • Why, he is so made on here within, as if he were son
    and heir to Mars; set a...
  • Why, he is so made on here within, as if he were son
    and heir to Mars; set at upper end o' the table; no
    question asked him by any of the senators, but they
    stand bald before him: our general himself makes a
    mistress of him: sanctifies himself with's hand and
    turns up the white o' the eye to his discourse. But
    the bottom of the news is that our general is cut i'
    the middle and but one half of what he was
    yesterday; for the other has half, by the entreaty
    and grant of the whole table. He'll go, he says,
    and sowl the porter of Rome gates by the ears: he
    will mow all down before him, and leave his passage polled.
  • First Servingman. But, more of thy news?

    Third Servingman. Why, he is so made on here within, as if he were son
    and heir to Mars; set at upper end o' the table; no
    question asked him by any of the senators, but they
    stand bald before him: our general himself makes a
    mistress of him: sanctifies himself with's hand and
    turns up the white o' the eye to his discourse. But
    the bottom of the news is that our general is cut i'
    the middle and but one half of what he was
    yesterday; for the other has half, by the entreaty
    and grant of the whole table. He'll go, he says,
    and sowl the porter of Rome gates by the ears: he
    will mow all down before him, and leave his passage polled.

17 IV / 5
  • Do't! he will do't; for, look you, sir, he has as
    many friends as enemies; w...
  • Do't! he will do't; for, look you, sir, he has as
    many friends as enemies; which friends, sir, as it
    were, durst not, look you, sir, show themselves, as
    we term it, his friends whilst he's in directitude.
  • Second Servingman. And he's as like to do't as any man I can imagine.

    Third Servingman. Do't! he will do't; for, look you, sir, he has as
    many friends as enemies; which friends, sir, as it
    were, durst not, look you, sir, show themselves, as
    we term it, his friends whilst he's in directitude.

18 IV / 5
  • But when they shall see, sir, his crest up again,
    and the man in blood, they...
  • But when they shall see, sir, his crest up again,
    and the man in blood, they will out of their
    burrows, like conies after rain, and revel all with
    him.
  • First Servingman. Directitude! what's that?

    Third Servingman. But when they shall see, sir, his crest up again,
    and the man in blood, they will out of their
    burrows, like conies after rain, and revel all with
    him.

19 IV / 5
  • To-morrow; to-day; presently; you shall have the
    drum struck up this afterno...
  • To-morrow; to-day; presently; you shall have the
    drum struck up this afternoon: 'tis, as it were, a
    parcel of their feast, and to be executed ere they
    wipe their lips.
  • First Servingman. But when goes this forward?

    Third Servingman. To-morrow; to-day; presently; you shall have the
    drum struck up this afternoon: 'tis, as it were, a
    parcel of their feast, and to be executed ere they
    wipe their lips.

20 IV / 5
  • Reason; because they then less need one another.
    The wars for my money. I ho...
  • Reason; because they then less need one another.
    The wars for my money. I hope to see Romans as cheap
    as Volscians. They are rising, they are rising.
  • First Servingman. Ay, and it makes men hate one another.

    Third Servingman. Reason; because they then less need one another.
    The wars for my money. I hope to see Romans as cheap
    as Volscians. They are rising, they are rising.

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© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.