Speeches (Lines) for Titania in "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

Total: 23
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 II / 1
  • What, jealous Oberon! Fairies, skip hence:
    I have forsworn his bed and compa...
  • What, jealous Oberon! Fairies, skip hence:
    I have forsworn his bed and company.
  • Oberon. Ill met by moonlight, proud Titania.

    Titania. What, jealous Oberon! Fairies, skip hence:
    I have forsworn his bed and company.

2 II / 1
  • Then I must be thy lady: but I know
    When thou hast stolen away from fairy la...
  • Then I must be thy lady: but I know
    When thou hast stolen away from fairy land,
    And in the shape of Corin sat all day,
    Playing on pipes of corn and versing love
    To amorous Phillida. Why art thou here,
    Come from the farthest Steppe of India?
    But that, forsooth, the bouncing Amazon,
    Your buskin'd mistress and your warrior love,
    To Theseus must be wedded, and you come
    To give their bed joy and prosperity.
  • Oberon. Tarry, rash wanton: am not I thy lord?

    Titania. Then I must be thy lady: but I know
    When thou hast stolen away from fairy land,
    And in the shape of Corin sat all day,
    Playing on pipes of corn and versing love
    To amorous Phillida. Why art thou here,
    Come from the farthest Steppe of India?
    But that, forsooth, the bouncing Amazon,
    Your buskin'd mistress and your warrior love,
    To Theseus must be wedded, and you come
    To give their bed joy and prosperity.

3 II / 1
  • These are the forgeries of jealousy:
    And never, since the middle summer's sp...
  • These are the forgeries of jealousy:
    And never, since the middle summer's spring,
    Met we on hill, in dale, forest or mead,
    By paved fountain or by rushy brook,
    Or in the beached margent of the sea,
    To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind,
    But with thy brawls thou hast disturb'd our sport.
    Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain,
    As in revenge, have suck'd up from the sea
    Contagious fogs; which falling in the land
    Have every pelting river made so proud
    That they have overborne their continents:
    The ox hath therefore stretch'd his yoke in vain,
    The ploughman lost his sweat, and the green corn
    Hath rotted ere his youth attain'd a beard;
    The fold stands empty in the drowned field,
    And crows are fatted with the murrion flock;
    The nine men's morris is fill'd up with mud,
    And the quaint mazes in the wanton green
    For lack of tread are undistinguishable:
    The human mortals want their winter here;
    No night is now with hymn or carol blest:
    Therefore the moon, the governess of floods,
    Pale in her anger, washes all the air,
    That rheumatic diseases do abound:
    And thorough this distemperature we see
    The seasons alter: hoary-headed frosts
    Far in the fresh lap of the crimson rose,
    And on old Hiems' thin and icy crown
    An odorous chaplet of sweet summer buds
    Is, as in mockery, set: the spring, the summer,
    The childing autumn, angry winter, change
    Their wonted liveries, and the mazed world,
    By their increase, now knows not which is which:
    And this same progeny of evils comes
    From our debate, from our dissension;
    We are their parents and original.
  • Oberon. How canst thou thus for shame, Titania,
    Glance at my credit with Hippolyta,
    Knowing I know thy love to Theseus?
    Didst thou not lead him through the glimmering night
    From Perigenia, whom he ravished?
    And make him with fair AEgle break his faith,
    With Ariadne and Antiopa?

    Titania. These are the forgeries of jealousy:
    And never, since the middle summer's spring,
    Met we on hill, in dale, forest or mead,
    By paved fountain or by rushy brook,
    Or in the beached margent of the sea,
    To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind,
    But with thy brawls thou hast disturb'd our sport.
    Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain,
    As in revenge, have suck'd up from the sea
    Contagious fogs; which falling in the land
    Have every pelting river made so proud
    That they have overborne their continents:
    The ox hath therefore stretch'd his yoke in vain,
    The ploughman lost his sweat, and the green corn
    Hath rotted ere his youth attain'd a beard;
    The fold stands empty in the drowned field,
    And crows are fatted with the murrion flock;
    The nine men's morris is fill'd up with mud,
    And the quaint mazes in the wanton green
    For lack of tread are undistinguishable:
    The human mortals want their winter here;
    No night is now with hymn or carol blest:
    Therefore the moon, the governess of floods,
    Pale in her anger, washes all the air,
    That rheumatic diseases do abound:
    And thorough this distemperature we see
    The seasons alter: hoary-headed frosts
    Far in the fresh lap of the crimson rose,
    And on old Hiems' thin and icy crown
    An odorous chaplet of sweet summer buds
    Is, as in mockery, set: the spring, the summer,
    The childing autumn, angry winter, change
    Their wonted liveries, and the mazed world,
    By their increase, now knows not which is which:
    And this same progeny of evils comes
    From our debate, from our dissension;
    We are their parents and original.

4 II / 1
  • Set your heart at rest:
    The fairy land buys not the child of me.
    His mot...
  • Set your heart at rest:
    The fairy land buys not the child of me.
    His mother was a votaress of my order:
    And, in the spiced Indian air, by night,
    Full often hath she gossip'd by my side,
    And sat with me on Neptune's yellow sands,
    Marking the embarked traders on the flood,
    When we have laugh'd to see the sails conceive
    And grow big-bellied with the wanton wind;
    Which she, with pretty and with swimming gait
    Following,--her womb then rich with my young squire,--
    Would imitate, and sail upon the land,
    To fetch me trifles, and return again,
    As from a voyage, rich with merchandise.
    But she, being mortal, of that boy did die;
    And for her sake do I rear up her boy,
    And for her sake I will not part with him.
  • Oberon. Do you amend it then; it lies in you:
    Why should Titania cross her Oberon?
    I do but beg a little changeling boy,
    To be my henchman.

    Titania. Set your heart at rest:
    The fairy land buys not the child of me.
    His mother was a votaress of my order:
    And, in the spiced Indian air, by night,
    Full often hath she gossip'd by my side,
    And sat with me on Neptune's yellow sands,
    Marking the embarked traders on the flood,
    When we have laugh'd to see the sails conceive
    And grow big-bellied with the wanton wind;
    Which she, with pretty and with swimming gait
    Following,--her womb then rich with my young squire,--
    Would imitate, and sail upon the land,
    To fetch me trifles, and return again,
    As from a voyage, rich with merchandise.
    But she, being mortal, of that boy did die;
    And for her sake do I rear up her boy,
    And for her sake I will not part with him.

5 II / 1
  • Perchance till after Theseus' wedding-day.
    If you will patiently dance in ou...
  • Perchance till after Theseus' wedding-day.
    If you will patiently dance in our round
    And see our moonlight revels, go with us;
    If not, shun me, and I will spare your haunts.
  • Oberon. How long within this wood intend you stay?

    Titania. Perchance till after Theseus' wedding-day.
    If you will patiently dance in our round
    And see our moonlight revels, go with us;
    If not, shun me, and I will spare your haunts.

6 II / 1
  • Not for thy fairy kingdom. Fairies, away!
    We shall chide downright, if I lon...
  • Not for thy fairy kingdom. Fairies, away!
    We shall chide downright, if I longer stay.
  • Oberon. Give me that boy, and I will go with thee.

    Titania. Not for thy fairy kingdom. Fairies, away!
    We shall chide downright, if I longer stay.

7 II / 2
  • Come, now a roundel and a fairy song;
    Then, for the third part of a minute,...
  • Come, now a roundel and a fairy song;
    Then, for the third part of a minute, hence;
    Some to kill cankers in the musk-rose buds,
    Some war with rere-mice for their leathern wings,
    To make my small elves coats, and some keep back
    The clamorous owl that nightly hoots and wonders
    At our quaint spirits. Sing me now asleep;
    Then to your offices and let me rest.
    [The Fairies sing]
    You spotted snakes with double tongue,
    Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen;
    Newts and blind-worms, do no wrong,
    Come not near our fairy queen.
    Philomel, with melody
    Sing in our sweet lullaby;
    Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby:
    Never harm,
    Nor spell nor charm,
    Come our lovely lady nigh;
    So, good night, with lullaby.
    Weaving spiders, come not here;
    Hence, you long-legg'd spinners, hence!
    Beetles black, approach not near;
    Worm nor snail, do no offence.
    Philomel, with melody, &c.
  • Puck. Fear not, my lord, your servant shall do so.

    Titania. Come, now a roundel and a fairy song;
    Then, for the third part of a minute, hence;
    Some to kill cankers in the musk-rose buds,
    Some war with rere-mice for their leathern wings,
    To make my small elves coats, and some keep back
    The clamorous owl that nightly hoots and wonders
    At our quaint spirits. Sing me now asleep;
    Then to your offices and let me rest.
    [The Fairies sing]
    You spotted snakes with double tongue,
    Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen;
    Newts and blind-worms, do no wrong,
    Come not near our fairy queen.
    Philomel, with melody
    Sing in our sweet lullaby;
    Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby:
    Never harm,
    Nor spell nor charm,
    Come our lovely lady nigh;
    So, good night, with lullaby.
    Weaving spiders, come not here;
    Hence, you long-legg'd spinners, hence!
    Beetles black, approach not near;
    Worm nor snail, do no offence.
    Philomel, with melody, &c.

8 III / 1
  • [Awaking] What angel wakes me from my flowery bed?
  • [Awaking] What angel wakes me from my flowery bed?
  • Bottom. I see their knavery: this is to make an ass of me;
    to fright me, if they could. But I will not stir
    from this place, do what they can: I will walk up
    and down here, and I will sing, that they shall hear
    I am not afraid.
    [Sings]
    The ousel cock so black of hue,
    With orange-tawny bill,
    The throstle with his note so true,
    The wren with little quill,--

    Titania. [Awaking] What angel wakes me from my flowery bed?

9 III / 1
  • I pray thee, gentle mortal, sing again:
    Mine ear is much enamour'd of thy no...
  • I pray thee, gentle mortal, sing again:
    Mine ear is much enamour'd of thy note;
    So is mine eye enthralled to thy shape;
    And thy fair virtue's force perforce doth move me
    On the first view to say, to swear, I love thee.
  • Bottom. [Sings]
    The finch, the sparrow and the lark,
    The plain-song cuckoo gray,
    Whose note full many a man doth mark,
    And dares not answer nay;--
    for, indeed, who would set his wit to so foolish
    a bird? who would give a bird the lie, though he cry
    'cuckoo' never so?

    Titania. I pray thee, gentle mortal, sing again:
    Mine ear is much enamour'd of thy note;
    So is mine eye enthralled to thy shape;
    And thy fair virtue's force perforce doth move me
    On the first view to say, to swear, I love thee.

10 III / 1
  • Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful.
  • Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful.
  • Bottom. Methinks, mistress, you should have little reason
    for that: and yet, to say the truth, reason and
    love keep little company together now-a-days; the
    more the pity that some honest neighbours will not
    make them friends. Nay, I can gleek upon occasion.

    Titania. Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful.

11 III / 1
  • Out of this wood do not desire to go:
    Thou shalt remain here, whether thou w...
  • Out of this wood do not desire to go:
    Thou shalt remain here, whether thou wilt or no.
    I am a spirit of no common rate;
    The summer still doth tend upon my state;
    And I do love thee: therefore, go with me;
    I'll give thee fairies to attend on thee,
    And they shall fetch thee jewels from the deep,
    And sing while thou on pressed flowers dost sleep;
    And I will purge thy mortal grossness so
    That thou shalt like an airy spirit go.
    Peaseblossom! Cobweb! Moth! and Mustardseed!
  • Bottom. Not so, neither: but if I had wit enough to get out
    of this wood, I have enough to serve mine own turn.

    Titania. Out of this wood do not desire to go:
    Thou shalt remain here, whether thou wilt or no.
    I am a spirit of no common rate;
    The summer still doth tend upon my state;
    And I do love thee: therefore, go with me;
    I'll give thee fairies to attend on thee,
    And they shall fetch thee jewels from the deep,
    And sing while thou on pressed flowers dost sleep;
    And I will purge thy mortal grossness so
    That thou shalt like an airy spirit go.
    Peaseblossom! Cobweb! Moth! and Mustardseed!

12 III / 1
  • Be kind and courteous to this gentleman;
    Hop in his walks and gambol in his...
  • Be kind and courteous to this gentleman;
    Hop in his walks and gambol in his eyes;
    Feed him with apricocks and dewberries,
    With purple grapes, green figs, and mulberries;
    The honey-bags steal from the humble-bees,
    And for night-tapers crop their waxen thighs
    And light them at the fiery glow-worm's eyes,
    To have my love to bed and to arise;
    And pluck the wings from Painted butterflies
    To fan the moonbeams from his sleeping eyes:
    Nod to him, elves, and do him courtesies.
  • All. Where shall we go?

    Titania. Be kind and courteous to this gentleman;
    Hop in his walks and gambol in his eyes;
    Feed him with apricocks and dewberries,
    With purple grapes, green figs, and mulberries;
    The honey-bags steal from the humble-bees,
    And for night-tapers crop their waxen thighs
    And light them at the fiery glow-worm's eyes,
    To have my love to bed and to arise;
    And pluck the wings from Painted butterflies
    To fan the moonbeams from his sleeping eyes:
    Nod to him, elves, and do him courtesies.

13 III / 1
  • Come, wait upon him; lead him to my bower.
    The moon methinks looks with a wa...
  • Come, wait upon him; lead him to my bower.
    The moon methinks looks with a watery eye;
    And when she weeps, weeps every little flower,
    Lamenting some enforced chastity.
    Tie up my love's tongue bring him silently.
  • Bottom. Good Master Mustardseed, I know your patience well:
    that same cowardly, giant-like ox-beef hath
    devoured many a gentleman of your house: I promise
    you your kindred had made my eyes water ere now. I
    desire your more acquaintance, good Master
    Mustardseed.

    Titania. Come, wait upon him; lead him to my bower.
    The moon methinks looks with a watery eye;
    And when she weeps, weeps every little flower,
    Lamenting some enforced chastity.
    Tie up my love's tongue bring him silently.

14 IV / 1
  • Come, sit thee down upon this flowery bed,
    While I thy amiable cheeks do coy...
  • Come, sit thee down upon this flowery bed,
    While I thy amiable cheeks do coy,
    And stick musk-roses in thy sleek smooth head,
    And kiss thy fair large ears, my gentle joy.
  • Puck. On the ground
    Sleep sound:
    I'll apply
    To your eye,
    Gentle lover, remedy.
    [Squeezing the juice on LYSANDER's eyes]
    When thou wakest,
    Thou takest
    True delight
    In the sight
    Of thy former lady's eye:
    And the country proverb known,
    That every man should take his own,
    In your waking shall be shown:
    Jack shall have Jill;
    Nought shall go ill;
    The man shall have his mare again, and all shall be well.

    Titania. Come, sit thee down upon this flowery bed,
    While I thy amiable cheeks do coy,
    And stick musk-roses in thy sleek smooth head,
    And kiss thy fair large ears, my gentle joy.

15 IV / 1
  • What, wilt thou hear some music,
    my sweet love?
  • What, wilt thou hear some music,
    my sweet love?
  • Bottom. Nothing, good mounsieur, but to help Cavalery Cobweb
    to scratch. I must to the barber's, monsieur; for
    methinks I am marvellous hairy about the face; and I
    am such a tender ass, if my hair do but tickle me,
    I must scratch.

    Titania. What, wilt thou hear some music,
    my sweet love?

16 IV / 1
  • Or say, sweet love, what thou desirest to eat.
  • Or say, sweet love, what thou desirest to eat.
  • Bottom. I have a reasonable good ear in music. Let's have
    the tongs and the bones.

    Titania. Or say, sweet love, what thou desirest to eat.

17 IV / 1
  • I have a venturous fairy that shall seek
    The squirrel's hoard, and fetch the...
  • I have a venturous fairy that shall seek
    The squirrel's hoard, and fetch thee new nuts.
  • Bottom. Truly, a peck of provender: I could munch your good
    dry oats. Methinks I have a great desire to a bottle
    of hay: good hay, sweet hay, hath no fellow.

    Titania. I have a venturous fairy that shall seek
    The squirrel's hoard, and fetch thee new nuts.

18 IV / 1
  • Sleep thou, and I will wind thee in my arms.
    Fairies, begone, and be all way...
  • Sleep thou, and I will wind thee in my arms.
    Fairies, begone, and be all ways away.
    [Exeunt fairies]
    So doth the woodbine the sweet honeysuckle
    Gently entwist; the female ivy so
    Enrings the barky fingers of the elm.
    O, how I love thee! how I dote on thee!
  • Bottom. I had rather have a handful or two of dried peas.
    But, I pray you, let none of your people stir me: I
    have an exposition of sleep come upon me.

    Titania. Sleep thou, and I will wind thee in my arms.
    Fairies, begone, and be all ways away.
    [Exeunt fairies]
    So doth the woodbine the sweet honeysuckle
    Gently entwist; the female ivy so
    Enrings the barky fingers of the elm.
    O, how I love thee! how I dote on thee!

19 IV / 1
  • My Oberon! what visions have I seen!
    Methought I was enamour'd of an ass.
  • My Oberon! what visions have I seen!
    Methought I was enamour'd of an ass.
  • Oberon. [Advancing] Welcome, good Robin.
    See'st thou this sweet sight?
    Her dotage now I do begin to pity:
    For, meeting her of late behind the wood,
    Seeking sweet favours from this hateful fool,
    I did upbraid her and fall out with her;
    For she his hairy temples then had rounded
    With a coronet of fresh and fragrant flowers;
    And that same dew, which sometime on the buds
    Was wont to swell like round and orient pearls,
    Stood now within the pretty flowerets' eyes
    Like tears that did their own disgrace bewail.
    When I had at my pleasure taunted her
    And she in mild terms begg'd my patience,
    I then did ask of her her changeling child;
    Which straight she gave me, and her fairy sent
    To bear him to my bower in fairy land.
    And now I have the boy, I will undo
    This hateful imperfection of her eyes:
    And, gentle Puck, take this transformed scalp
    From off the head of this Athenian swain;
    That, he awaking when the other do,
    May all to Athens back again repair
    And think no more of this night's accidents
    But as the fierce vexation of a dream.
    But first I will release the fairy queen.
    Be as thou wast wont to be;
    See as thou wast wont to see:
    Dian's bud o'er Cupid's flower
    Hath such force and blessed power.
    Now, my Titania; wake you, my sweet queen.

    Titania. My Oberon! what visions have I seen!
    Methought I was enamour'd of an ass.

20 IV / 1
  • How came these things to pass?
    O, how mine eyes do loathe his visage now!
  • How came these things to pass?
    O, how mine eyes do loathe his visage now!
  • Oberon. There lies your love.

    Titania. How came these things to pass?
    O, how mine eyes do loathe his visage now!

21 IV / 1
  • Music, ho! music, such as charmeth sleep!
  • Music, ho! music, such as charmeth sleep!
  • Oberon. Silence awhile. Robin, take off this head.
    Titania, music call; and strike more dead
    Than common sleep of all these five the sense.

    Titania. Music, ho! music, such as charmeth sleep!

22 IV / 1
  • Come, my lord, and in our flight
    Tell me how it came this night
    That I s...
  • Come, my lord, and in our flight
    Tell me how it came this night
    That I sleeping here was found
    With these mortals on the ground.
  • Oberon. Then, my queen, in silence sad,
    Trip we after the night's shade:
    We the globe can compass soon,
    Swifter than the wandering moon.

    Titania. Come, my lord, and in our flight
    Tell me how it came this night
    That I sleeping here was found
    With these mortals on the ground.

23 V / 1
  • First, rehearse your song by rote
    To each word a warbling note:
    Hand in...
  • First, rehearse your song by rote
    To each word a warbling note:
    Hand in hand, with fairy grace,
    Will we sing, and bless this place.
  • Oberon. Through the house give gathering light,
    By the dead and drowsy fire:
    Every elf and fairy sprite
    Hop as light as bird from brier;
    And this ditty, after me,
    Sing, and dance it trippingly.

    Titania. First, rehearse your song by rote
    To each word a warbling note:
    Hand in hand, with fairy grace,
    Will we sing, and bless this place.

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© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.