Speeches (Lines) for Tullus Aufidius in "The Tragedy of Coriolanus"

Total: 45
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 I / 2
  • Is it not yours?
    What ever have been thought on in this state,
    That coul...
  • Is it not yours?
    What ever have been thought on in this state,
    That could be brought to bodily act ere Rome
    Had circumvention? 'Tis not four days gone
    Since I heard thence; these are the words: I think
    I have the letter here; yes, here it is.
    [Reads]
    'They have press'd a power, but it is not known
    Whether for east or west: the dearth is great;
    The people mutinous; and it is rumour'd,
    Cominius, CORIOLANUS your old enemy,
    Who is of Rome worse hated than of you,
    And Titus TITUS, a most valiant Roman,
    These three lead on this preparation
    Whither 'tis bent: most likely 'tis for you:
    Consider of it.'
  • First Senator. So, your opinion is, Aufidius,
    That they of Rome are entered in our counsels
    And know how we proceed.

    Tullus Aufidius. Is it not yours?
    What ever have been thought on in this state,
    That could be brought to bodily act ere Rome
    Had circumvention? 'Tis not four days gone
    Since I heard thence; these are the words: I think
    I have the letter here; yes, here it is.
    [Reads]
    'They have press'd a power, but it is not known
    Whether for east or west: the dearth is great;
    The people mutinous; and it is rumour'd,
    Cominius, CORIOLANUS your old enemy,
    Who is of Rome worse hated than of you,
    And Titus TITUS, a most valiant Roman,
    These three lead on this preparation
    Whither 'tis bent: most likely 'tis for you:
    Consider of it.'

2 I / 2
  • Nor did you think it folly
    To keep your great pretences veil'd till when
  • Nor did you think it folly
    To keep your great pretences veil'd till when
    They needs must show themselves; which
    in the hatching,
    It seem'd, appear'd to Rome. By the discovery.
    We shall be shorten'd in our aim, which was
    To take in many towns ere almost Rome
    Should know we were afoot.
  • First Senator. Our army's in the field
    We never yet made doubt but Rome was ready
    To answer us.

    Tullus Aufidius. Nor did you think it folly
    To keep your great pretences veil'd till when
    They needs must show themselves; which
    in the hatching,
    It seem'd, appear'd to Rome. By the discovery.
    We shall be shorten'd in our aim, which was
    To take in many towns ere almost Rome
    Should know we were afoot.

3 I / 2
  • O, doubt not that;
    I speak from certainties. Nay, more,
    Some parcels of...
  • O, doubt not that;
    I speak from certainties. Nay, more,
    Some parcels of their power are forth already,
    And only hitherward. I leave your honours.
    If we and Caius CORIOLANUS chance to meet,
    'Tis sworn between us we shall ever strike
    Till one can do no more.
  • Second Senator. Noble Aufidius,
    Take your commission; hie you to your bands:
    Let us alone to guard Corioli:
    If they set down before 's, for the remove
    Bring your army; but, I think, you'll find
    They've not prepared for us.

    Tullus Aufidius. O, doubt not that;
    I speak from certainties. Nay, more,
    Some parcels of their power are forth already,
    And only hitherward. I leave your honours.
    If we and Caius CORIOLANUS chance to meet,
    'Tis sworn between us we shall ever strike
    Till one can do no more.

4 I / 2
  • And keep your honours safe!
  • And keep your honours safe!
  • All. The gods assist you!

    Tullus Aufidius. And keep your honours safe!

5 I / 8
  • We hate alike:
    Not Afric owns a serpent I abhor
    More than thy fame and e...
  • We hate alike:
    Not Afric owns a serpent I abhor
    More than thy fame and envy. Fix thy foot.
  • Coriolanus. I'll fight with none but thee; for I do hate thee
    Worse than a promise-breaker.

    Tullus Aufidius. We hate alike:
    Not Afric owns a serpent I abhor
    More than thy fame and envy. Fix thy foot.

6 I / 8
  • If I fly, CORIOLANUS,
    Holloa me like a hare.
  • If I fly, CORIOLANUS,
    Holloa me like a hare.
  • Coriolanus. Let the first budger die the other's slave,
    And the gods doom him after!

    Tullus Aufidius. If I fly, CORIOLANUS,
    Holloa me like a hare.

7 I / 8
  • Wert thou the Hector
    That was the whip of your bragg'd progeny,
    Thou sho...
  • Wert thou the Hector
    That was the whip of your bragg'd progeny,
    Thou shouldst not scape me here.
    [They fight, and certain Volsces come to the aid of]
    AUFIDIUS. CORIOLANUS fights till they be driven in
    breathless]
    Officious, and not valiant, you have shamed me
    In your condemned seconds.
  • Coriolanus. Within these three hours, Tullus,
    Alone I fought in your Corioli walls,
    And made what work I pleased: 'tis not my blood
    Wherein thou seest me mask'd; for thy revenge
    Wrench up thy power to the highest.

    Tullus Aufidius. Wert thou the Hector
    That was the whip of your bragg'd progeny,
    Thou shouldst not scape me here.
    [They fight, and certain Volsces come to the aid of]
    AUFIDIUS. CORIOLANUS fights till they be driven in
    breathless]
    Officious, and not valiant, you have shamed me
    In your condemned seconds.

8 I / 10
  • The town is ta'en!
  • The town is ta'en!
  • Cominius. Go we to our tent:
    The blood upon your visage dries; 'tis time
    It should be look'd to: come.

    Tullus Aufidius. The town is ta'en!

9 I / 10
  • Condition!
    I would I were a Roman; for I cannot,
    Being a Volsce, be that...
  • Condition!
    I would I were a Roman; for I cannot,
    Being a Volsce, be that I am. Condition!
    What good condition can a treaty find
    I' the part that is at mercy? Five times, CORIOLANUS,
    I have fought with thee: so often hast thou beat me,
    And wouldst do so, I think, should we encounter
    As often as we eat. By the elements,
    If e'er again I meet him beard to beard,
    He's mine, or I am his: mine emulation
    Hath not that honour in't it had; for where
    I thought to crush him in an equal force,
    True sword to sword, I'll potch at him some way
    Or wrath or craft may get him.
  • First Soldier. 'Twill be deliver'd back on good condition.

    Tullus Aufidius. Condition!
    I would I were a Roman; for I cannot,
    Being a Volsce, be that I am. Condition!
    What good condition can a treaty find
    I' the part that is at mercy? Five times, CORIOLANUS,
    I have fought with thee: so often hast thou beat me,
    And wouldst do so, I think, should we encounter
    As often as we eat. By the elements,
    If e'er again I meet him beard to beard,
    He's mine, or I am his: mine emulation
    Hath not that honour in't it had; for where
    I thought to crush him in an equal force,
    True sword to sword, I'll potch at him some way
    Or wrath or craft may get him.

10 I / 10
  • Bolder, though not so subtle. My valour's poison'd
    With only suffering stain...
  • Bolder, though not so subtle. My valour's poison'd
    With only suffering stain by him; for him
    Shall fly out of itself: nor sleep nor sanctuary,
    Being naked, sick, nor fane nor Capitol,
    The prayers of priests nor times of sacrifice,
    Embarquements all of fury, shall lift up
    Their rotten privilege and custom 'gainst
    My hate to CORIOLANUS: where I find him, were it
    At home, upon my brother's guard, even there,
    Against the hospitable canon, would I
    Wash my fierce hand in's heart. Go you to the city;
    Learn how 'tis held; and what they are that must
    Be hostages for Rome.
  • First Soldier. He's the devil.

    Tullus Aufidius. Bolder, though not so subtle. My valour's poison'd
    With only suffering stain by him; for him
    Shall fly out of itself: nor sleep nor sanctuary,
    Being naked, sick, nor fane nor Capitol,
    The prayers of priests nor times of sacrifice,
    Embarquements all of fury, shall lift up
    Their rotten privilege and custom 'gainst
    My hate to CORIOLANUS: where I find him, were it
    At home, upon my brother's guard, even there,
    Against the hospitable canon, would I
    Wash my fierce hand in's heart. Go you to the city;
    Learn how 'tis held; and what they are that must
    Be hostages for Rome.

11 I / 10
  • I am attended at the cypress grove: I pray you--
    'Tis south the city mills--...
  • I am attended at the cypress grove: I pray you--
    'Tis south the city mills--bring me word thither
    How the world goes, that to the pace of it
    I may spur on my journey.
  • First Soldier. Will not you go?

    Tullus Aufidius. I am attended at the cypress grove: I pray you--
    'Tis south the city mills--bring me word thither
    How the world goes, that to the pace of it
    I may spur on my journey.

12 IV / 5
  • Where is this fellow?
  • Where is this fellow?
  • Coriolanus. Ay; 'tis an honester service than to meddle with thy
    mistress. Thou pratest, and pratest; serve with thy
    trencher, hence!

    Tullus Aufidius. Where is this fellow?

13 IV / 5
  • Whence comest thou? what wouldst thou? thy name?
    Why speak'st not? speak, ma...
  • Whence comest thou? what wouldst thou? thy name?
    Why speak'st not? speak, man: what's thy name?
  • Second Servingman. Here, sir: I'ld have beaten him like a dog, but for
    disturbing the lords within.

    Tullus Aufidius. Whence comest thou? what wouldst thou? thy name?
    Why speak'st not? speak, man: what's thy name?

14 IV / 5
  • What is thy name?
  • What is thy name?
  • Coriolanus. If, Tullus,
    [Unmuffling]
    Not yet thou knowest me, and, seeing me, dost not
    Think me for the man I am, necessity
    Commands me name myself.

    Tullus Aufidius. What is thy name?

15 IV / 5
  • Say, what's thy name?
    Thou hast a grim appearance, and thy face
    Bears a...
  • Say, what's thy name?
    Thou hast a grim appearance, and thy face
    Bears a command in't; though thy tackle's torn.
    Thou show'st a noble vessel: what's thy name?
  • Coriolanus. A name unmusical to the Volscians' ears,
    And harsh in sound to thine.

    Tullus Aufidius. Say, what's thy name?
    Thou hast a grim appearance, and thy face
    Bears a command in't; though thy tackle's torn.
    Thou show'st a noble vessel: what's thy name?

16 IV / 5
  • I know thee not: thy name?
  • I know thee not: thy name?
  • Coriolanus. Prepare thy brow to frown: know'st
    thou me yet?

    Tullus Aufidius. I know thee not: thy name?

17 IV / 5
  • O CORIOLANUS, CORIOLANUS!
    Each word thou hast spoke hath weeded from my hear...
  • O CORIOLANUS, CORIOLANUS!
    Each word thou hast spoke hath weeded from my heart
    A root of ancient envy. If Jupiter
    Should from yond cloud speak divine things,
    And say 'Tis true,' I'ld not believe them more
    Than thee, all noble CORIOLANUS. Let me twine
    Mine arms about that body, where against
    My grained ash an hundred times hath broke
    And scarr'd the moon with splinters: here I clip
    The anvil of my sword, and do contest
    As hotly and as nobly with thy love
    As ever in ambitious strength I did
    Contend against thy valour. Know thou first,
    I loved the maid I married; never man
    Sigh'd truer breath; but that I see thee here,
    Thou noble thing! more dances my rapt heart
    Than when I first my wedded mistress saw
    Bestride my threshold. Why, thou Mars! I tell thee,
    We have a power on foot; and I had purpose
    Once more to hew thy target from thy brawn,
    Or lose mine arm fort: thou hast beat me out
    Twelve several times, and I have nightly since
    Dreamt of encounters 'twixt thyself and me;
    We have been down together in my sleep,
    Unbuckling helms, fisting each other's throat,
    And waked half dead with nothing. Worthy CORIOLANUS,
    Had we no quarrel else to Rome, but that
    Thou art thence banish'd, we would muster all
    From twelve to seventy, and pouring war
    Into the bowels of ungrateful Rome,
    Like a bold flood o'er-bear. O, come, go in,
    And take our friendly senators by the hands;
    Who now are here, taking their leaves of me,
    Who am prepared against your territories,
    Though not for Rome itself.
  • Coriolanus. My name is Caius CORIOLANUS, who hath done
    To thee particularly and to all the Volsces
    Great hurt and mischief; thereto witness may
    My surname, Coriolanus: the painful service,
    The extreme dangers and the drops of blood
    Shed for my thankless country are requited
    But with that surname; a good memory,
    And witness of the malice and displeasure
    Which thou shouldst bear me: only that name remains;
    The cruelty and envy of the people,
    Permitted by our dastard nobles, who
    Have all forsook me, hath devour'd the rest;
    And suffer'd me by the voice of slaves to be
    Whoop'd out of Rome. Now this extremity
    Hath brought me to thy hearth; not out of hope--
    Mistake me not--to save my life, for if
    I had fear'd death, of all the men i' the world
    I would have 'voided thee, but in mere spite,
    To be full quit of those my banishers,
    Stand I before thee here. Then if thou hast
    A heart of wreak in thee, that wilt revenge
    Thine own particular wrongs and stop those maims
    Of shame seen through thy country, speed
    thee straight,
    And make my misery serve thy turn: so use it
    That my revengeful services may prove
    As benefits to thee, for I will fight
    Against my canker'd country with the spleen
    Of all the under fiends. But if so be
    Thou darest not this and that to prove more fortunes
    Thou'rt tired, then, in a word, I also am
    Longer to live most weary, and present
    My throat to thee and to thy ancient malice;
    Which not to cut would show thee but a fool,
    Since I have ever follow'd thee with hate,
    Drawn tuns of blood out of thy country's breast,
    And cannot live but to thy shame, unless
    It be to do thee service.

    Tullus Aufidius. O CORIOLANUS, CORIOLANUS!
    Each word thou hast spoke hath weeded from my heart
    A root of ancient envy. If Jupiter
    Should from yond cloud speak divine things,
    And say 'Tis true,' I'ld not believe them more
    Than thee, all noble CORIOLANUS. Let me twine
    Mine arms about that body, where against
    My grained ash an hundred times hath broke
    And scarr'd the moon with splinters: here I clip
    The anvil of my sword, and do contest
    As hotly and as nobly with thy love
    As ever in ambitious strength I did
    Contend against thy valour. Know thou first,
    I loved the maid I married; never man
    Sigh'd truer breath; but that I see thee here,
    Thou noble thing! more dances my rapt heart
    Than when I first my wedded mistress saw
    Bestride my threshold. Why, thou Mars! I tell thee,
    We have a power on foot; and I had purpose
    Once more to hew thy target from thy brawn,
    Or lose mine arm fort: thou hast beat me out
    Twelve several times, and I have nightly since
    Dreamt of encounters 'twixt thyself and me;
    We have been down together in my sleep,
    Unbuckling helms, fisting each other's throat,
    And waked half dead with nothing. Worthy CORIOLANUS,
    Had we no quarrel else to Rome, but that
    Thou art thence banish'd, we would muster all
    From twelve to seventy, and pouring war
    Into the bowels of ungrateful Rome,
    Like a bold flood o'er-bear. O, come, go in,
    And take our friendly senators by the hands;
    Who now are here, taking their leaves of me,
    Who am prepared against your territories,
    Though not for Rome itself.

18 IV / 5
  • Therefore, most absolute sir, if thou wilt have
    The leading of thine own rev...
  • Therefore, most absolute sir, if thou wilt have
    The leading of thine own revenges, take
    The one half of my commission; and set down--
    As best thou art experienced, since thou know'st
    Thy country's strength and weakness,--thine own ways;
    Whether to knock against the gates of Rome,
    Or rudely visit them in parts remote,
    To fright them, ere destroy. But come in:
    Let me commend thee first to those that shall
    Say yea to thy desires. A thousand welcomes!
    And more a friend than e'er an enemy;
    Yet, CORIOLANUS, that was much. Your hand: most welcome!
    [Exeunt CORIOLANUS and AUFIDIUS. The two]
    Servingmen come forward]
  • Coriolanus. You bless me, gods!

    Tullus Aufidius. Therefore, most absolute sir, if thou wilt have
    The leading of thine own revenges, take
    The one half of my commission; and set down--
    As best thou art experienced, since thou know'st
    Thy country's strength and weakness,--thine own ways;
    Whether to knock against the gates of Rome,
    Or rudely visit them in parts remote,
    To fright them, ere destroy. But come in:
    Let me commend thee first to those that shall
    Say yea to thy desires. A thousand welcomes!
    And more a friend than e'er an enemy;
    Yet, CORIOLANUS, that was much. Your hand: most welcome!
    [Exeunt CORIOLANUS and AUFIDIUS. The two]
    Servingmen come forward]

19 IV / 7
  • Do they still fly to the Roman?
  • Do they still fly to the Roman?
  • Sicinius Velutus. Pray, let us go.

    Tullus Aufidius. Do they still fly to the Roman?

20 IV / 7
  • I cannot help it now,
    Unless, by using means, I lame the foot
    Of our des...
  • I cannot help it now,
    Unless, by using means, I lame the foot
    Of our design. He bears himself more proudlier,
    Even to my person, than I thought he would
    When first I did embrace him: yet his nature
    In that's no changeling; and I must excuse
    What cannot be amended.
  • Lieutenant. I do not know what witchcraft's in him, but
    Your soldiers use him as the grace 'fore meat,
    Their talk at table, and their thanks at end;
    And you are darken'd in this action, sir,
    Even by your own.

    Tullus Aufidius. I cannot help it now,
    Unless, by using means, I lame the foot
    Of our design. He bears himself more proudlier,
    Even to my person, than I thought he would
    When first I did embrace him: yet his nature
    In that's no changeling; and I must excuse
    What cannot be amended.

21 IV / 7
  • I understand thee well; and be thou sure,
    when he shall come to his account,...
  • I understand thee well; and be thou sure,
    when he shall come to his account, he knows not
    What I can urge against him. Although it seems,
    And so he thinks, and is no less apparent
    To the vulgar eye, that he bears all things fairly.
    And shows good husbandry for the Volscian state,
    Fights dragon-like, and does achieve as soon
    As draw his sword; yet he hath left undone
    That which shall break his neck or hazard mine,
    Whene'er we come to our account.
  • Lieutenant. Yet I wish, sir,--
    I mean for your particular,--you had not
    Join'd in commission with him; but either
    Had borne the action of yourself, or else
    To him had left it solely.

    Tullus Aufidius. I understand thee well; and be thou sure,
    when he shall come to his account, he knows not
    What I can urge against him. Although it seems,
    And so he thinks, and is no less apparent
    To the vulgar eye, that he bears all things fairly.
    And shows good husbandry for the Volscian state,
    Fights dragon-like, and does achieve as soon
    As draw his sword; yet he hath left undone
    That which shall break his neck or hazard mine,
    Whene'er we come to our account.

22 IV / 7
  • All places yield to him ere he sits down;
    And the nobility of Rome are his:...
  • All places yield to him ere he sits down;
    And the nobility of Rome are his:
    The senators and patricians love him too:
    The tribunes are no soldiers; and their people
    Will be as rash in the repeal, as hasty
    To expel him thence. I think he'll be to Rome
    As is the osprey to the fish, who takes it
    By sovereignty of nature. First he was
    A noble servant to them; but he could not
    Carry his honours even: whether 'twas pride,
    Which out of daily fortune ever taints
    The happy man; whether defect of judgment,
    To fail in the disposing of those chances
    Which he was lord of; or whether nature,
    Not to be other than one thing, not moving
    From the casque to the cushion, but commanding peace
    Even with the same austerity and garb
    As he controll'd the war; but one of these--
    As he hath spices of them all, not all,
    For I dare so far free him--made him fear'd,
    So hated, and so banish'd: but he has a merit,
    To choke it in the utterance. So our virtues
    Lie in the interpretation of the time:
    And power, unto itself most commendable,
    Hath not a tomb so evident as a chair
    To extol what it hath done.
    One fire drives out one fire; one nail, one nail;
    Rights by rights falter, strengths by strengths do fail.
    Come, let's away. When, Caius, Rome is thine,
    Thou art poor'st of all; then shortly art thou mine.
  • Lieutenant. Sir, I beseech you, think you he'll carry Rome?

    Tullus Aufidius. All places yield to him ere he sits down;
    And the nobility of Rome are his:
    The senators and patricians love him too:
    The tribunes are no soldiers; and their people
    Will be as rash in the repeal, as hasty
    To expel him thence. I think he'll be to Rome
    As is the osprey to the fish, who takes it
    By sovereignty of nature. First he was
    A noble servant to them; but he could not
    Carry his honours even: whether 'twas pride,
    Which out of daily fortune ever taints
    The happy man; whether defect of judgment,
    To fail in the disposing of those chances
    Which he was lord of; or whether nature,
    Not to be other than one thing, not moving
    From the casque to the cushion, but commanding peace
    Even with the same austerity and garb
    As he controll'd the war; but one of these--
    As he hath spices of them all, not all,
    For I dare so far free him--made him fear'd,
    So hated, and so banish'd: but he has a merit,
    To choke it in the utterance. So our virtues
    Lie in the interpretation of the time:
    And power, unto itself most commendable,
    Hath not a tomb so evident as a chair
    To extol what it hath done.
    One fire drives out one fire; one nail, one nail;
    Rights by rights falter, strengths by strengths do fail.
    Come, let's away. When, Caius, Rome is thine,
    Thou art poor'st of all; then shortly art thou mine.

23 V / 2
  • You keep a constant temper.
  • You keep a constant temper.
  • Coriolanus. Wife, mother, child, I know not. My affairs
    Are servanted to others: though I owe
    My revenge properly, my remission lies
    In Volscian breasts. That we have been familiar,
    Ingrate forgetfulness shall poison, rather
    Than pity note how much. Therefore, be gone.
    Mine ears against your suits are stronger than
    Your gates against my force. Yet, for I loved thee,
    Take this along; I writ it for thy sake
    [Gives a letter]
    And would have rent it. Another word, Menenius,
    I will not hear thee speak. This man, Aufidius,
    Was my beloved in Rome: yet thou behold'st!

    Tullus Aufidius. You keep a constant temper.

24 V / 3
  • Only their ends
    You have respected; stopp'd your ears against
    The genera...
  • Only their ends
    You have respected; stopp'd your ears against
    The general suit of Rome; never admitted
    A private whisper, no, not with such friends
    That thought them sure of you.
  • Coriolanus. We will before the walls of Rome tomorrow
    Set down our host. My partner in this action,
    You must report to the Volscian lords, how plainly
    I have borne this business.

    Tullus Aufidius. Only their ends
    You have respected; stopp'd your ears against
    The general suit of Rome; never admitted
    A private whisper, no, not with such friends
    That thought them sure of you.

25 V / 3
  • I was moved withal.
  • I was moved withal.
  • Coriolanus. O mother, mother!
    What have you done? Behold, the heavens do ope,
    The gods look down, and this unnatural scene
    They laugh at. O my mother, mother! O!
    You have won a happy victory to Rome;
    But, for your son,--believe it, O, believe it,
    Most dangerously you have with him prevail'd,
    If not most mortal to him. But, let it come.
    Aufidius, though I cannot make true wars,
    I'll frame convenient peace. Now, good Aufidius,
    Were you in my stead, would you have heard
    A mother less? or granted less, Aufidius?

    Tullus Aufidius. I was moved withal.

26 V / 3
  • [Aside] I am glad thou hast set thy mercy and
    thy honour
    At difference i...
  • [Aside] I am glad thou hast set thy mercy and
    thy honour
    At difference in thee: out of that I'll work
    Myself a former fortune.
  • Coriolanus. I dare be sworn you were:
    And, sir, it is no little thing to make
    Mine eyes to sweat compassion. But, good sir,
    What peace you'll make, advise me: for my part,
    I'll not to Rome, I'll back with you; and pray you,
    Stand to me in this cause. O mother! wife!

    Tullus Aufidius. [Aside] I am glad thou hast set thy mercy and
    thy honour
    At difference in thee: out of that I'll work
    Myself a former fortune.

27 V / 6
  • Go tell the lords o' the city I am here:
    Deliver them this paper: having rea...
  • Go tell the lords o' the city I am here:
    Deliver them this paper: having read it,
    Bid them repair to the market place; where I,
    Even in theirs and in the commons' ears,
    Will vouch the truth of it. Him I accuse
    The city ports by this hath enter'd and
    Intends to appear before the people, hoping
    To purge herself with words: dispatch.
    [Exeunt Attendants]
    [Enter three or four Conspirators of AUFIDIUS' faction]
    Most welcome!
  • All. Welcome, ladies, Welcome!

    Tullus Aufidius. Go tell the lords o' the city I am here:
    Deliver them this paper: having read it,
    Bid them repair to the market place; where I,
    Even in theirs and in the commons' ears,
    Will vouch the truth of it. Him I accuse
    The city ports by this hath enter'd and
    Intends to appear before the people, hoping
    To purge herself with words: dispatch.
    [Exeunt Attendants]
    [Enter three or four Conspirators of AUFIDIUS' faction]
    Most welcome!

28 V / 6
  • Even so
    As with a man by his own alms empoison'd,
    And with his charity s...
  • Even so
    As with a man by his own alms empoison'd,
    And with his charity slain.
  • First Conspirator. How is it with our general?

    Tullus Aufidius. Even so
    As with a man by his own alms empoison'd,
    And with his charity slain.

29 V / 6
  • Sir, I cannot tell:
    We must proceed as we do find the people.
  • Sir, I cannot tell:
    We must proceed as we do find the people.
  • Second Conspirator. Most noble sir,
    If you do hold the same intent wherein
    You wish'd us parties, we'll deliver you
    Of your great danger.

    Tullus Aufidius. Sir, I cannot tell:
    We must proceed as we do find the people.

30 V / 6
  • I know it;
    And my pretext to strike at him admits
    A good construction. I...
  • I know it;
    And my pretext to strike at him admits
    A good construction. I raised him, and I pawn'd
    Mine honour for his truth: who being so heighten'd,
    He water'd his new plants with dews of flattery,
    Seducing so my friends; and, to this end,
    He bow'd his nature, never known before
    But to be rough, unswayable and free.
  • Third Conspirator. The people will remain uncertain whilst
    'Twixt you there's difference; but the fall of either
    Makes the survivor heir of all.

    Tullus Aufidius. I know it;
    And my pretext to strike at him admits
    A good construction. I raised him, and I pawn'd
    Mine honour for his truth: who being so heighten'd,
    He water'd his new plants with dews of flattery,
    Seducing so my friends; and, to this end,
    He bow'd his nature, never known before
    But to be rough, unswayable and free.

31 V / 6
  • That I would have spoke of:
    Being banish'd for't, he came unto my hearth;
  • That I would have spoke of:
    Being banish'd for't, he came unto my hearth;
    Presented to my knife his throat: I took him;
    Made him joint-servant with me; gave him way
    In all his own desires; nay, let him choose
    Out of my files, his projects to accomplish,
    My best and freshest men; served his designments
    In mine own person; holp to reap the fame
    Which he did end all his; and took some pride
    To do myself this wrong: till, at the last,
    I seem'd his follower, not partner, and
    He waged me with his countenance, as if
    I had been mercenary.
  • Third Conspirator. Sir, his stoutness
    When he did stand for consul, which he lost
    By lack of stooping,--

    Tullus Aufidius. That I would have spoke of:
    Being banish'd for't, he came unto my hearth;
    Presented to my knife his throat: I took him;
    Made him joint-servant with me; gave him way
    In all his own desires; nay, let him choose
    Out of my files, his projects to accomplish,
    My best and freshest men; served his designments
    In mine own person; holp to reap the fame
    Which he did end all his; and took some pride
    To do myself this wrong: till, at the last,
    I seem'd his follower, not partner, and
    He waged me with his countenance, as if
    I had been mercenary.

32 V / 6
  • There was it:
    For which my sinews shall be stretch'd upon him.
    At a few...
  • There was it:
    For which my sinews shall be stretch'd upon him.
    At a few drops of women's rheum, which are
    As cheap as lies, he sold the blood and labour
    Of our great action: therefore shall he die,
    And I'll renew me in his fall. But, hark!
    [Drums and trumpets sound, with great shouts of]
    the People]
  • First Conspirator. So he did, my lord:
    The army marvell'd at it, and, in the last,
    When he had carried Rome and that we look'd
    For no less spoil than glory,--

    Tullus Aufidius. There was it:
    For which my sinews shall be stretch'd upon him.
    At a few drops of women's rheum, which are
    As cheap as lies, he sold the blood and labour
    Of our great action: therefore shall he die,
    And I'll renew me in his fall. But, hark!
    [Drums and trumpets sound, with great shouts of]
    the People]

33 V / 6
  • Say no more:
    Here come the lords.
  • Say no more:
    Here come the lords.
  • Third Conspirator. Therefore, at your vantage,
    Ere he express himself, or move the people
    With what he would say, let him feel your sword,
    Which we will second. When he lies along,
    After your way his tale pronounced shall bury
    His reasons with his body.

    Tullus Aufidius. Say no more:
    Here come the lords.

34 V / 6
  • I have not deserved it.
    But, worthy lords, have you with heed perused
    Wh...
  • I have not deserved it.
    But, worthy lords, have you with heed perused
    What I have written to you?
  • All Lords. You are most welcome home.

    Tullus Aufidius. I have not deserved it.
    But, worthy lords, have you with heed perused
    What I have written to you?

35 V / 6
  • He approaches: you shall hear him.
    [Enter CORIOLANUS, marching with drum and...
  • He approaches: you shall hear him.
    [Enter CORIOLANUS, marching with drum and]
    colours; commoners being with him]
  • First Lord. And grieve to hear't.
    What faults he made before the last, I think
    Might have found easy fines: but there to end
    Where he was to begin and give away
    The benefit of our levies, answering us
    With our own charge, making a treaty where
    There was a yielding,--this admits no excuse.

    Tullus Aufidius. He approaches: you shall hear him.
    [Enter CORIOLANUS, marching with drum and]
    colours; commoners being with him]

36 V / 6
  • Read it not, noble lords;
    But tell the traitor, in the high'st degree
    He...
  • Read it not, noble lords;
    But tell the traitor, in the high'st degree
    He hath abused your powers.
  • Coriolanus. Hail, lords! I am return'd your soldier,
    No more infected with my country's love
    Than when I parted hence, but still subsisting
    Under your great command. You are to know
    That prosperously I have attempted and
    With bloody passage led your wars even to
    The gates of Rome. Our spoils we have brought home
    Do more than counterpoise a full third part
    The charges of the action. We have made peace
    With no less honour to the Antiates
    Than shame to the Romans: and we here deliver,
    Subscribed by the consuls and patricians,
    Together with the seal o' the senate, what
    We have compounded on.

    Tullus Aufidius. Read it not, noble lords;
    But tell the traitor, in the high'st degree
    He hath abused your powers.

37 V / 6
  • Ay, traitor, CORIOLANUS!
  • Ay, traitor, CORIOLANUS!
  • Coriolanus. Traitor! how now!

    Tullus Aufidius. Ay, traitor, CORIOLANUS!

38 V / 6
  • Ay, CORIOLANUS, Caius CORIOLANUS: dost thou think
    I'll grace thee with that...
  • Ay, CORIOLANUS, Caius CORIOLANUS: dost thou think
    I'll grace thee with that robbery, thy stol'n name
    Coriolanus in Corioli?
    You lords and heads o' the state, perfidiously
    He has betray'd your business, and given up,
    For certain drops of salt, your city Rome,
    I say 'your city,' to his wife and mother;
    Breaking his oath and resolution like
    A twist of rotten silk, never admitting
    Counsel o' the war, but at his nurse's tears
    He whined and roar'd away your victory,
    That pages blush'd at him and men of heart
    Look'd wondering each at other.
  • Coriolanus. CORIOLANUS!

    Tullus Aufidius. Ay, CORIOLANUS, Caius CORIOLANUS: dost thou think
    I'll grace thee with that robbery, thy stol'n name
    Coriolanus in Corioli?
    You lords and heads o' the state, perfidiously
    He has betray'd your business, and given up,
    For certain drops of salt, your city Rome,
    I say 'your city,' to his wife and mother;
    Breaking his oath and resolution like
    A twist of rotten silk, never admitting
    Counsel o' the war, but at his nurse's tears
    He whined and roar'd away your victory,
    That pages blush'd at him and men of heart
    Look'd wondering each at other.

39 V / 6
  • Name not the god, thou boy of tears!
  • Name not the god, thou boy of tears!
  • Coriolanus. Hear'st thou, Mars?

    Tullus Aufidius. Name not the god, thou boy of tears!

40 V / 6
  • No more.
  • No more.
  • Coriolanus. Ha!

    Tullus Aufidius. No more.

41 V / 6
  • Why, noble lords,
    Will you be put in mind of his blind fortune,
    Which wa...
  • Why, noble lords,
    Will you be put in mind of his blind fortune,
    Which was your shame, by this unholy braggart,
    'Fore your own eyes and ears?
  • Coriolanus. Cut me to pieces, Volsces; men and lads,
    Stain all your edges on me. Boy! false hound!
    If you have writ your annals true, 'tis there,
    That, like an eagle in a dove-cote, I
    Flutter'd your Volscians in Corioli:
    Alone I did it. Boy!

    Tullus Aufidius. Why, noble lords,
    Will you be put in mind of his blind fortune,
    Which was your shame, by this unholy braggart,
    'Fore your own eyes and ears?

42 V / 6
  • Insolent villain!
  • Insolent villain!
  • Coriolanus. O that I had him,
    With six Aufidiuses, or more, his tribe,
    To use my lawful sword!

    Tullus Aufidius. Insolent villain!

43 V / 6
  • My noble masters, hear me speak.
  • My noble masters, hear me speak.
  • All Lords. Hold, hold, hold, hold!

    Tullus Aufidius. My noble masters, hear me speak.

44 V / 6
  • My lords, when you shall know--as in this rage,
    Provoked by him, you cannot-...
  • My lords, when you shall know--as in this rage,
    Provoked by him, you cannot--the great danger
    Which this man's life did owe you, you'll rejoice
    That he is thus cut off. Please it your honours
    To call me to your senate, I'll deliver
    Myself your loyal servant, or endure
    Your heaviest censure.
  • Third Lord. Tread not upon him. Masters all, be quiet;
    Put up your swords.

    Tullus Aufidius. My lords, when you shall know--as in this rage,
    Provoked by him, you cannot--the great danger
    Which this man's life did owe you, you'll rejoice
    That he is thus cut off. Please it your honours
    To call me to your senate, I'll deliver
    Myself your loyal servant, or endure
    Your heaviest censure.

45 V / 6
  • My rage is gone;
    And I am struck with sorrow. Take him up.
    Help, three o...
  • My rage is gone;
    And I am struck with sorrow. Take him up.
    Help, three o' the chiefest soldiers; I'll be one.
    Beat thou the drum, that it speak mournfully:
    Trail your steel pikes. Though in this city he
    Hath widow'd and unchilded many a one,
    Which to this hour bewail the injury,
    Yet he shall have a noble memory. Assist.
  • Second Lord. His own impatience
    Takes from Aufidius a great part of blame.
    Let's make the best of it.

    Tullus Aufidius. My rage is gone;
    And I am struck with sorrow. Take him up.
    Help, three o' the chiefest soldiers; I'll be one.
    Beat thou the drum, that it speak mournfully:
    Trail your steel pikes. Though in this city he
    Hath widow'd and unchilded many a one,
    Which to this hour bewail the injury,
    Yet he shall have a noble memory. Assist.

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© Copyright 2017-2021 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.