Speeches (Lines) for Vernon in "History of Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 12
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 II, 4, 961
  • Stay, lords and gentlemen, and pluck no more,
    Till you conclude that he upon...
  • Stay, lords and gentlemen, and pluck no more,
    Till you conclude that he upon whose side
    The fewest roses are cropp'd from the tree
    Shall yield the other in the right opinion.
  • Earl of Suffolk. I pluck this red rose with young Somerset
    And say withal I think he held the right.

    Vernon. Stay, lords and gentlemen, and pluck no more,
    Till you conclude that he upon whose side
    The fewest roses are cropp'd from the tree
    Shall yield the other in the right opinion.

2 II, 4, 969
  • Then for the truth and plainness of the case.
    I pluck this pale and maiden b...
  • Then for the truth and plainness of the case.
    I pluck this pale and maiden blossom here,
    Giving my verdict on the white rose side.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). And I.

    Vernon. Then for the truth and plainness of the case.
    I pluck this pale and maiden blossom here,
    Giving my verdict on the white rose side.

3 II, 4, 975
  • If I my lord, for my opinion bleed,
    Opinion shall be surgeon to my hurt
    ...
  • If I my lord, for my opinion bleed,
    Opinion shall be surgeon to my hurt
    And keep me on the side where still I am.
  • Duke/Earl of Somerset. Prick not your finger as you pluck it off,
    Lest bleeding you do paint the white rose red
    And fall on my side so, against your will.

    Vernon. If I my lord, for my opinion bleed,
    Opinion shall be surgeon to my hurt
    And keep me on the side where still I am.

4 II, 4, 1068
  • In your behalf still will I wear the same.
  • In your behalf still will I wear the same.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Good Master Vernon, I am bound to you,
    That you on my behalf would pluck a flower.

    Vernon. In your behalf still will I wear the same.

5 III, 4, 1736
  • Now, sir, to you, that were so hot at sea,
    Disgracing of these colours that...
  • Now, sir, to you, that were so hot at sea,
    Disgracing of these colours that I wear
    In honour of my noble Lord of York:
    Darest thou maintain the former words thou spakest?
  • (stage directions). [Sennet. Flourish. Exeunt all but VERNON and BASSET]

    Vernon. Now, sir, to you, that were so hot at sea,
    Disgracing of these colours that I wear
    In honour of my noble Lord of York:
    Darest thou maintain the former words thou spakest?

6 III, 4, 1743
  • Sirrah, thy lord I honour as he is.
  • Sirrah, thy lord I honour as he is.
  • Basset. Yes, sir; as well as you dare patronage
    The envious barking of your saucy tongue
    Against my lord the Duke of Somerset.

    Vernon. Sirrah, thy lord I honour as he is.

7 III, 4, 1745
  • Hark ye; not so: in witness, take ye that.
  • Hark ye; not so: in witness, take ye that.
  • Basset. Why, what is he? as good a man as York.

    Vernon. Hark ye; not so: in witness, take ye that.

8 III, 4, 1753
  • Well, miscreant, I'll be there as soon as you;
    And, after, meet you sooner t...
  • Well, miscreant, I'll be there as soon as you;
    And, after, meet you sooner than you would.
  • Basset. Villain, thou know'st the law of arms is such
    That whoso draws a sword, 'tis present death,
    Or else this blow should broach thy dearest blood.
    But I'll unto his majesty, and crave
    I may have liberty to venge this wrong;
    When thou shalt see I'll meet thee to thy cost.

    Vernon. Well, miscreant, I'll be there as soon as you;
    And, after, meet you sooner than you would.

9 IV, 1, 1843
  • Grant me the combat, gracious sovereign.
  • Grant me the combat, gracious sovereign.
  • (stage directions). [Enter VERNON and BASSET]

    Vernon. Grant me the combat, gracious sovereign.

10 IV, 1, 1850
  • With him, my lord; for he hath done me wrong.
  • With him, my lord; for he hath done me wrong.
  • Henry VI. Be patient, lords; and give them leave to speak.
    Say, gentlemen, what makes you thus exclaim?
    And wherefore crave you combat? or with whom?

    Vernon. With him, my lord; for he hath done me wrong.

11 IV, 1, 1866
  • And that is my petition, noble lord:
    For though he seem with forged quaint c...
  • And that is my petition, noble lord:
    For though he seem with forged quaint conceit
    To set a gloss upon his bold intent,
    Yet know, my lord, I was provoked by him;
    And he first took exceptions at this badge,
    Pronouncing that the paleness of this flower
    Bewray'd the faintness of my master's heart.
  • Basset. Crossing the sea from England into France,
    This fellow here, with envious carping tongue,
    Upbraided me about the rose I wear;
    Saying, the sanguine colour of the leaves
    Did represent my master's blushing cheeks,
    When stubbornly he did repugn the truth
    About a certain question in the law
    Argued betwixt the Duke of York and him;
    With other vile and ignominious terms:
    In confutation of which rude reproach
    And in defence of my lord's worthiness,
    I crave the benefit of law of arms.

    Vernon. And that is my petition, noble lord:
    For though he seem with forged quaint conceit
    To set a gloss upon his bold intent,
    Yet know, my lord, I was provoked by him;
    And he first took exceptions at this badge,
    Pronouncing that the paleness of this flower
    Bewray'd the faintness of my master's heart.

12 IV, 1, 1886
  • Nay, let it rest where it began at first.
  • Nay, let it rest where it began at first.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). There is my pledge; accept it, Somerset.

    Vernon. Nay, let it rest where it began at first.

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