Speeches (Lines) for Earl of Warwick in "History of Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 24
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 II, 4, 931
  • Between two hawks, which flies the higher pitch;
    Between two dogs, which hat...
  • Between two hawks, which flies the higher pitch;
    Between two dogs, which hath the deeper mouth;
    Between two blades, which bears the better temper:
    Between two horses, which doth bear him best;
    Between two girls, which hath the merriest eye;
    I have perhaps some shallow spirit of judgement;
    But in these nice sharp quillets of the law,
    Good faith, I am no wiser than a daw.
  • Duke/Earl of Somerset. Judge you, my Lord of Warwick, then, between us.

    Earl of Warwick. Between two hawks, which flies the higher pitch;
    Between two dogs, which hath the deeper mouth;
    Between two blades, which bears the better temper:
    Between two horses, which doth bear him best;
    Between two girls, which hath the merriest eye;
    I have perhaps some shallow spirit of judgement;
    But in these nice sharp quillets of the law,
    Good faith, I am no wiser than a daw.

2 II, 4, 956
  • I love no colours, and without all colour
    Of base insinuating flattery
    I...
  • I love no colours, and without all colour
    Of base insinuating flattery
    I pluck this white rose with Plantagenet.
  • Duke/Earl of Somerset. Let him that is no coward nor no flatterer,
    But dare maintain the party of the truth,
    Pluck a red rose from off this thorn with me.

    Earl of Warwick. I love no colours, and without all colour
    Of base insinuating flattery
    I pluck this white rose with Plantagenet.

3 II, 4, 1013
  • Now, by God's will, thou wrong'st him, Somerset;
    His grandfather was Lionel...
  • Now, by God's will, thou wrong'st him, Somerset;
    His grandfather was Lionel Duke of Clarence,
    Third son to the third Edward King of England:
    Spring crestless yeomen from so deep a root?
  • Duke/Earl of Somerset. Away, away, good William de la Pole!
    We grace the yeoman by conversing with him.

    Earl of Warwick. Now, by God's will, thou wrong'st him, Somerset;
    His grandfather was Lionel Duke of Clarence,
    Third son to the third Edward King of England:
    Spring crestless yeomen from so deep a root?

4 II, 4, 1053
  • This blot that they object against your house
    Shall be wiped out in the next...
  • This blot that they object against your house
    Shall be wiped out in the next parliament
    Call'd for the truce of Winchester and Gloucester;
    And if thou be not then created York,
    I will not live to be accounted Warwick.
    Meantime, in signal of my love to thee,
    Against proud Somerset and William Pole,
    Will I upon thy party wear this rose:
    And here I prophesy: this brawl to-day,
    Grown to this faction in the Temple-garden,
    Shall send between the red rose and the white
    A thousand souls to death and deadly night.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). How I am braved and must perforce endure it!

    Earl of Warwick. This blot that they object against your house
    Shall be wiped out in the next parliament
    Call'd for the truce of Winchester and Gloucester;
    And if thou be not then created York,
    I will not live to be accounted Warwick.
    Meantime, in signal of my love to thee,
    Against proud Somerset and William Pole,
    Will I upon thy party wear this rose:
    And here I prophesy: this brawl to-day,
    Grown to this faction in the Temple-garden,
    Shall send between the red rose and the white
    A thousand souls to death and deadly night.

5 III, 1, 1274
  • Roam thither, then.
  • Roam thither, then.
  • Winchester. Rome shall remedy this.

    Earl of Warwick. Roam thither, then.

6 III, 1, 1276
  • Ay, see the bishop be not overborne.
  • Ay, see the bishop be not overborne.
  • Duke/Earl of Somerset. My lord, it were your duty to forbear.

    Earl of Warwick. Ay, see the bishop be not overborne.

7 III, 1, 1279
  • Methinks his lordship should be humbler;
    it fitteth not a prelate so to plea...
  • Methinks his lordship should be humbler;
    it fitteth not a prelate so to plead.
  • Duke/Earl of Somerset. Methinks my lord should be religious
    And know the office that belongs to such.

    Earl of Warwick. Methinks his lordship should be humbler;
    it fitteth not a prelate so to plead.

8 III, 1, 1282
  • State holy or unhallow'd, what of that?
    Is not his grace protector to the ki...
  • State holy or unhallow'd, what of that?
    Is not his grace protector to the king?
  • Duke/Earl of Somerset. Yes, when his holy state is touch'd so near.

    Earl of Warwick. State holy or unhallow'd, what of that?
    Is not his grace protector to the king?

9 III, 1, 1300
  • An uproar, I dare warrant,
    Begun through malice of the bishop's men.
  • An uproar, I dare warrant,
    Begun through malice of the bishop's men.
  • Henry VI. Uncles of Gloucester and of Winchester,
    The special watchmen of our English weal,
    I would prevail, if prayers might prevail,
    To join your hearts in love and amity.
    O, what a scandal is it to our crown,
    That two such noble peers as ye should jar!
    Believe me, lords, my tender years can tell
    Civil dissension is a viperous worm
    That gnaws the bowels of the commonwealth.
    [A noise within, 'Down with the tawny-coats!']
    What tumult's this?

    Earl of Warwick. An uproar, I dare warrant,
    Begun through malice of the bishop's men.

10 III, 1, 1343
  • Yield, my lord protector; yield, Winchester;
    Except you mean with obstinate...
  • Yield, my lord protector; yield, Winchester;
    Except you mean with obstinate repulse
    To slay your sovereign and destroy the realm.
    You see what mischief and what murder too
    Hath been enacted through your enmity;
    Then be at peace except ye thirst for blood.
  • Henry VI. O, how this discord doth afflict my soul!
    Can you, my Lord of Winchester, behold
    My sighs and tears and will not once relent?
    Who should be pitiful, if you be not?
    Or who should study to prefer a peace.
    If holy churchmen take delight in broils?

    Earl of Warwick. Yield, my lord protector; yield, Winchester;
    Except you mean with obstinate repulse
    To slay your sovereign and destroy the realm.
    You see what mischief and what murder too
    Hath been enacted through your enmity;
    Then be at peace except ye thirst for blood.

11 III, 1, 1353
  • Behold, my Lord of Winchester, the duke
    Hath banish'd moody discontented fur...
  • Behold, my Lord of Winchester, the duke
    Hath banish'd moody discontented fury,
    As by his smoothed brows it doth appear:
    Why look you still so stern and tragical?
  • Duke of Gloucester. Compassion on the king commands me stoop;
    Or I would see his heart out, ere the priest
    Should ever get that privilege of me.

    Earl of Warwick. Behold, my Lord of Winchester, the duke
    Hath banish'd moody discontented fury,
    As by his smoothed brows it doth appear:
    Why look you still so stern and tragical?

12 III, 1, 1362
  • Sweet king! the bishop hath a kindly gird.
    For shame, my lord of Winchester,...
  • Sweet king! the bishop hath a kindly gird.
    For shame, my lord of Winchester, relent!
    What, shall a child instruct you what to do?
  • Henry VI. Fie, uncle Beaufort! I have heard you preach
    That malice was a great and grievous sin;
    And will not you maintain the thing you teach,
    But prove a chief offender in the same?

    Earl of Warwick. Sweet king! the bishop hath a kindly gird.
    For shame, my lord of Winchester, relent!
    What, shall a child instruct you what to do?

13 III, 1, 1381
  • Accept this scroll, most gracious sovereign,
    Which in the right of Richard P...
  • Accept this scroll, most gracious sovereign,
    Which in the right of Richard Plantagenet
    We do exhibit to your majesty.
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt Serving-men, Mayor, &c]

    Earl of Warwick. Accept this scroll, most gracious sovereign,
    Which in the right of Richard Plantagenet
    We do exhibit to your majesty.

14 III, 1, 1392
  • Let Richard be restored to his blood;
    So shall his father's wrongs be recomp...
  • Let Richard be restored to his blood;
    So shall his father's wrongs be recompensed.
  • Henry VI. And those occasions, uncle, were of force:
    Therefore, my loving lords, our pleasure is
    That Richard be restored to his blood.

    Earl of Warwick. Let Richard be restored to his blood;
    So shall his father's wrongs be recompensed.

15 IV, 1, 1942
  • My Lord of York, I promise you, the king
    Prettily, methought, did play the o...
  • My Lord of York, I promise you, the king
    Prettily, methought, did play the orator.
  • Henry VI. Come hither, you that would be combatants:
    Henceforth I charge you, as you love our favour,
    Quite to forget this quarrel and the cause.
    And you, my lords, remember where we are,
    In France, amongst a fickle wavering nation:
    If they perceive dissension in our looks
    And that within ourselves we disagree,
    How will their grudging stomachs be provoked
    To wilful disobedience, and rebel!
    Beside, what infamy will there arise,
    When foreign princes shall be certified
    That for a toy, a thing of no regard,
    King Henry's peers and chief nobility
    Destroy'd themselves, and lost the realm of France!
    O, think upon the conquest of my father,
    My tender years, and let us not forego
    That for a trifle that was bought with blood
    Let me be umpire in this doubtful strife.
    I see no reason, if I wear this rose,
    [Putting on a red rose]
    That any one should therefore be suspicious
    I more incline to Somerset than York:
    Both are my kinsmen, and I love them both:
    As well they may upbraid me with my crown,
    Because, forsooth, the king of Scots is crown'd.
    But your discretions better can persuade
    Than I am able to instruct or teach:
    And therefore, as we hither came in peace,
    So let us still continue peace and love.
    Cousin of York, we institute your grace
    To be our regent in these parts of France:
    And, good my Lord of Somerset, unite
    Your troops of horsemen with his bands of foot;
    And, like true subjects, sons of your progenitors,
    Go cheerfully together and digest.
    Your angry choler on your enemies.
    Ourself, my lord protector and the rest
    After some respite will return to Calais;
    From thence to England; where I hope ere long
    To be presented, by your victories,
    With Charles, Alencon and that traitorous rout.
    [Flourish. Exeunt all but YORK, WARWICK, EXETER]
    and VERNON]

    Earl of Warwick. My Lord of York, I promise you, the king
    Prettily, methought, did play the orator.

16 IV, 1, 1946
  • Tush, that was but his fancy, blame him not;
    I dare presume, sweet prince, h...
  • Tush, that was but his fancy, blame him not;
    I dare presume, sweet prince, he thought no harm.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). And so he did; but yet I like it not,
    In that he wears the badge of Somerset.

    Earl of Warwick. Tush, that was but his fancy, blame him not;
    I dare presume, sweet prince, he thought no harm.

17 V, 4, 2684
  • Graceless! wilt thou deny thy parentage?
  • Graceless! wilt thou deny thy parentage?
  • Shepherd. Out, out! My lords, an please you, 'tis not so;
    I did beget her, all the parish knows:
    Her mother liveth yet, can testify
    She was the first fruit of my bachelorship.

    Earl of Warwick. Graceless! wilt thou deny thy parentage?

18 V, 4, 2726
  • And hark ye, sirs; because she is a maid,
    Spare for no faggots, let there be...
  • And hark ye, sirs; because she is a maid,
    Spare for no faggots, let there be enow:
    Place barrels of pitch upon the fatal stake,
    That so her torture may be shortened.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Ay, ay: away with her to execution!

    Earl of Warwick. And hark ye, sirs; because she is a maid,
    Spare for no faggots, let there be enow:
    Place barrels of pitch upon the fatal stake,
    That so her torture may be shortened.

19 V, 4, 2737
  • The greatest miracle that e'er ye wrought:
    Is all your strict preciseness co...
  • The greatest miracle that e'er ye wrought:
    Is all your strict preciseness come to this?
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Now heaven forfend! the holy maid with child!

    Earl of Warwick. The greatest miracle that e'er ye wrought:
    Is all your strict preciseness come to this?

20 V, 4, 2741
  • Well, go to; we'll have no bastards live;
    Especially since Charles must fath...
  • Well, go to; we'll have no bastards live;
    Especially since Charles must father it.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). She and the Dauphin have been juggling:
    I did imagine what would be her refuge.

    Earl of Warwick. Well, go to; we'll have no bastards live;
    Especially since Charles must father it.

21 V, 4, 2750
  • A married man! that's most intolerable.
  • A married man! that's most intolerable.
  • Joan la Pucelle. O, give me leave, I have deluded you:
    'Twas neither Charles nor yet the duke I named,
    But Reignier, king of Naples, that prevail'd.

    Earl of Warwick. A married man! that's most intolerable.

22 V, 4, 2753
  • It's sign she hath been liberal and free.
  • It's sign she hath been liberal and free.
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Why, here's a girl! I think she knows not well,
    There were so many, whom she may accuse.

    Earl of Warwick. It's sign she hath been liberal and free.

23 V, 4, 2786
  • Be patient, York: if we conclude a peace,
    It shall be with such strict and s...
  • Be patient, York: if we conclude a peace,
    It shall be with such strict and severe covenants
    As little shall the Frenchmen gain thereby.
    [Enter CHARLES, ALENCON, BASTARD OF ORLEANS,]
    REIGNIER, and others]
  • Richard Plantagenet (Duke of Gloucester). Is all our travail turn'd to this effect?
    After the slaughter of so many peers,
    So many captains, gentlemen and soldiers,
    That in this quarrel have been overthrown
    And sold their bodies for their country's benefit,
    Shall we at last conclude effeminate peace?
    Have we not lost most part of all the towns,
    By treason, falsehood and by treachery,
    Our great progenitors had conquered?
    O Warwick, Warwick! I foresee with grief
    The utter loss of all the realm of France.

    Earl of Warwick. Be patient, York: if we conclude a peace,
    It shall be with such strict and severe covenants
    As little shall the Frenchmen gain thereby.
    [Enter CHARLES, ALENCON, BASTARD OF ORLEANS,]
    REIGNIER, and others]

24 V, 4, 2840
  • How say'st thou, Charles? shall our condition stand?
  • How say'st thou, Charles? shall our condition stand?
  • Duke of Alencon. To say the truth, it is your policy
    To save your subjects from such massacre
    And ruthless slaughters as are daily seen
    By our proceeding in hostility;
    And therefore take this compact of a truce,
    Although you break it when your pleasure serves.

    Earl of Warwick. How say'st thou, Charles? shall our condition stand?

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