Speeches (Lines) for (stage directions) in "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark"

Total: 113
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 1
  • Enter two Sentinels-[first,] Francisco, [who paces up and down at his post; then...
  • Enter two Sentinels-[first,] Francisco, [who paces up and down at his post; then] Bernardo, [who approaches him].
  • .

    (stage directions). Enter two Sentinels-[first,] Francisco, [who paces up and down at his post; then] Bernardo, [who approaches him].

2 I, 1, 16
  • Enter Horatio and Marcellus.
  • Enter Horatio and Marcellus.
  • Bernardo. Well, good night.
    If you do meet Horatio and Marcellus,
    The rivals of my watch, bid them make haste.

    (stage directions). Enter Horatio and Marcellus.

3 I, 1, 51
  • Enter Ghost.
  • Enter Ghost.
  • Bernardo. Last night of all,
    When yond same star that's westward from the pole
    Had made his course t' illume that part of heaven
    Where now it burns, Marcellus and myself,
    The bell then beating one-

    (stage directions). Enter Ghost.

4 I, 1, 66
  • Exit Ghost.
  • Exit Ghost.
  • Horatio. Stay! Speak, speak! I charge thee speak!

    (stage directions). Exit Ghost.

5 I, 1, 199
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Horatio. So have I heard and do in part believe it.
    But look, the morn, in russet mantle clad,
    Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastward hill.
    Break we our watch up; and by my advice
    Let us impart what we have seen to-night
    Unto young Hamlet; for, upon my life,
    This spirit, dumb to us, will speak to him.
    Do you consent we shall acquaint him with it,
    As needful in our loves, fitting our duty?
    Let's do't, I pray; and I this morning know
    Where we shall find him most conveniently.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

6 I, 2, 200
  • Flourish. [Enter Claudius, King of Denmark, Gertrude the Queen, Hamlet, Polonius...
  • Flourish. [Enter Claudius, King of Denmark, Gertrude the Queen, Hamlet, Polonius, Laertes and his sister Ophelia, [Voltemand, Cornelius,] Lords Attendant.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Flourish. [Enter Claudius, King of Denmark, Gertrude the Queen, Hamlet, Polonius, Laertes and his sister Ophelia, [Voltemand, Cornelius,] Lords Attendant.

7 I, 2, 332
  • Flourish. Exeunt all but Hamlet.
  • Flourish. Exeunt all but Hamlet.
  • Claudius. Why, 'tis a loving and a fair reply.
    Be as ourself in Denmark. Madam, come.
    This gentle and unforc'd accord of Hamlet
    Sits smiling to my heart; in grace whereof,
    No jocund health that Denmark drinks to-day
    But the great cannon to the clouds shall tell,
    And the King's rouse the heaven shall bruit again,
    Respeaking earthly thunder. Come away.

    (stage directions). Flourish. Exeunt all but Hamlet.

8 I, 2, 364
  • Enter Horatio, Marcellus, and Bernardo.
  • Enter Horatio, Marcellus, and Bernardo.
  • Hamlet. O that this too too solid flesh would melt,
    Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!
    Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd
    His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! God!
    How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
    Seem to me all the uses of this world!
    Fie on't! ah, fie! 'Tis an unweeded garden
    That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature
    Possess it merely. That it should come to this!
    But two months dead! Nay, not so much, not two.
    So excellent a king, that was to this
    Hyperion to a satyr; so loving to my mother
    That he might not beteem the winds of heaven
    Visit her face too roughly. Heaven and earth!
    Must I remember? Why, she would hang on him
    As if increase of appetite had grown
    By what it fed on; and yet, within a month-
    Let me not think on't! Frailty, thy name is woman!-
    A little month, or ere those shoes were old
    With which she followed my poor father's body
    Like Niobe, all tears- why she, even she
    (O God! a beast that wants discourse of reason
    Would have mourn'd longer) married with my uncle;
    My father's brother, but no more like my father
    Than I to Hercules. Within a month,
    Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears
    Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,
    She married. O, most wicked speed, to post
    With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!
    It is not, nor it cannot come to good.
    But break my heart, for I must hold my tongue!

    (stage directions). Enter Horatio, Marcellus, and Bernardo.

9 I, 2, 480
  • Exit.
  • Exit.
  • Hamlet. Your loves, as mine to you. Farewell.
    [Exeunt [all but Hamlet].]
    My father's spirit- in arms? All is not well.
    I doubt some foul play. Would the night were come!
    Till then sit still, my soul. Foul deeds will rise,
    Though all the earth o'erwhelm them, to men's eyes.

    (stage directions). Exit.

10 I, 3, 481
  • Enter Laertes and Ophelia.
  • Enter Laertes and Ophelia.
  • (stage directions). Exit.

    (stage directions). Enter Laertes and Ophelia.

11 I, 3, 624
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Ophelia. I shall obey, my lord.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

12 I, 4, 625
  • Enter Hamlet, Horatio, and Marcellus.
  • Enter Hamlet, Horatio, and Marcellus.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet, Horatio, and Marcellus.

13 I, 4, 666
  • Enter Ghost.
  • Enter Ghost.
  • Hamlet. Ay, marry, is't;
    But to my mind, though I am native here
    And to the manner born, it is a custom
    More honour'd in the breach than the observance.
    This heavy-headed revel east and west
    Makes us traduc'd and tax'd of other nations;
    They clip us drunkards and with swinish phrase
    Soil our addition; and indeed it takes
    From our achievements, though perform'd at height,
    The pith and marrow of our attribute.
    So oft it chances in particular men
    That, for some vicious mole of nature in them,
    As in their birth,- wherein they are not guilty,
    Since nature cannot choose his origin,-
    By the o'ergrowth of some complexion,
    Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason,
    Or by some habit that too much o'erleavens
    The form of plausive manners, that these men
    Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect,
    Being nature's livery, or fortune's star,
    Their virtues else- be they as pure as grace,
    As infinite as man may undergo-
    Shall in the general censure take corruption
    From that particular fault. The dram of e'il
    Doth all the noble substance often dout To his own scandal.

    (stage directions). Enter Ghost.

14 I, 4, 687
  • Ghost beckons Hamlet.
  • Ghost beckons Hamlet.
  • Hamlet. Angels and ministers of grace defend us!
    Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damn'd,
    Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell,
    Be thy intents wicked or charitable,
    Thou com'st in such a questionable shape
    That I will speak to thee. I'll call thee Hamlet,
    King, father, royal Dane. O, answer me?
    Let me not burst in ignorance, but tell
    Why thy canoniz'd bones, hearsed in death,
    Have burst their cerements; why the sepulchre
    Wherein we saw thee quietly inurn'd,
    Hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws
    To cast thee up again. What may this mean
    That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel,
    Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon,
    Making night hideous, and we fools of nature
    So horridly to shake our disposition
    With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls?
    Say, why is this? wherefore? What should we do?

    (stage directions). Ghost beckons Hamlet.

15 I, 4, 724
  • Exeunt Ghost and Hamlet.
  • Exeunt Ghost and Hamlet.
  • Hamlet. My fate cries out
    And makes each petty artire in this body
    As hardy as the Nemean lion's nerve.
    [Ghost beckons.]
    Still am I call'd. Unhand me, gentlemen.
    By heaven, I'll make a ghost of him that lets me!-
    I say, away!- Go on. I'll follow thee.

    (stage directions). Exeunt Ghost and Hamlet.

16 I, 4, 731
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Marcellus. Nay, let's follow him.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

17 I, 5, 732
  • Enter Ghost and Hamlet.
  • Enter Ghost and Hamlet.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter Ghost and Hamlet.

18 I, 5, 852
  • Enter Horatio and Marcellus.
  • Enter Horatio and Marcellus.
  • Horatio. [within] My lord, my lord!

    (stage directions). Enter Horatio and Marcellus.

19 I, 5, 900
  • Ghost cries under the stage.
  • Ghost cries under the stage.
  • Hamlet. Indeed, upon my sword, indeed.

    (stage directions). Ghost cries under the stage.

20 I, 5, 936
  • [They swear.]
  • [They swear.]
  • Father's Ghost. [beneath] Swear.

    (stage directions). [They swear.]

21 I, 5, 946
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Hamlet. Rest, rest, perturbed spirit! So, gentlemen,
    With all my love I do commend me to you;
    And what so poor a man as Hamlet is
    May do t' express his love and friending to you,
    God willing, shall not lack. Let us go in together;
    And still your fingers on your lips, I pray.
    The time is out of joint. O cursed spite
    That ever I was born to set it right!
    Nay, come, let's go together.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

22 II, 1, 947
  • Enter Polonius and Reynaldo.
  • Enter Polonius and Reynaldo.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter Polonius and Reynaldo.

23 II, 1, 1081
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Polonius. That hath made him mad.
    I am sorry that with better heed and judgment
    I had not quoted him. I fear'd he did but trifle
    And meant to wrack thee; but beshrew my jealousy!
    By heaven, it is as proper to our age
    To cast beyond ourselves in our opinions
    As it is common for the younger sort
    To lack discretion. Come, go we to the King.
    This must be known; which, being kept close, might move
    More grief to hide than hate to utter love.
    Come.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

24 II, 2, 1082
  • Flourish. [Enter King and Queen, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern,
  • Flourish. [Enter King and Queen, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern,
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Flourish. [Enter King and Queen, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern,

25 II, 2, 1083
  • cum aliis.
  • cum aliis.
  • (stage directions). Flourish. [Enter King and Queen, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern,

    (stage directions). cum aliis.

26 II, 2, 1126
  • Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, [with some...
  • Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, [with some Attendants].
  • Gertrude. Ay, amen!

    (stage directions). Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, [with some Attendants].

27 II, 2, 1127
  • Enter Polonius.
  • Enter Polonius.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, [with some Attendants].

    (stage directions). Enter Polonius.

28 II, 2, 1271
  • Enter Hamlet, reading on a book.
  • Enter Hamlet, reading on a book.
  • Claudius. We will try it.

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet, reading on a book.

29 II, 2, 1319
  • Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • Hamlet. You cannot, sir, take from me anything that I will more
    willingly part withal- except my life, except my life, except my
    life,

    (stage directions). Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

30 II, 2, 1324
  • Exit [Polonius].
  • Exit [Polonius].
  • Rosencrantz. [to Polonius] God save you, sir!

    (stage directions). Exit [Polonius].

31 II, 2, 1451
  • Flourish for the Players.
  • Flourish for the Players.
  • Hamlet. It is not very strange; for my uncle is King of Denmark, and
    those that would make mows at him while my father lived give
    twenty, forty, fifty, a hundred ducats apiece for his picture in
    little. 'Sblood, there is something in this more than natural, if
    philosophy could find it out.

    (stage directions). Flourish for the Players.

32 II, 2, 1462
  • Enter Polonius.
  • Enter Polonius.
  • Hamlet. I am but mad north-north-west. When the wind is southerly I
    know a hawk from a handsaw.

    (stage directions). Enter Polonius.

33 III, 1, 1681
  • Enter King, Queen, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern,
  • Enter King, Queen, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern,
  • Hamlet. Ay, so, God b' wi' ye!
    [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]
    Now I am alone.
    O what a rogue and peasant slave am I!
    Is it not monstrous that this player here,
    But in a fiction, in a dream of passion,
    Could force his soul so to his own conceit
    That, from her working, all his visage wann'd,
    Tears in his eyes, distraction in's aspect,
    A broken voice, and his whole function suiting
    With forms to his conceit? And all for nothing!
    For Hecuba!
    What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba,
    That he should weep for her? What would he do,
    Had he the motive and the cue for passion
    That I have? He would drown the stage with tears
    And cleave the general ear with horrid speech;
    Make mad the guilty and appal the free,
    Confound the ignorant, and amaze indeed
    The very faculties of eyes and ears.
    Yet I,
    A dull and muddy-mettled rascal, peak
    Like John-a-dreams, unpregnant of my cause,
    And can say nothing! No, not for a king,
    Upon whose property and most dear life
    A damn'd defeat was made. Am I a coward?
    Who calls me villain? breaks my pate across?
    Plucks off my beard and blows it in my face?
    Tweaks me by th' nose? gives me the lie i' th' throat
    As deep as to the lungs? Who does me this, ha?
    'Swounds, I should take it! for it cannot be
    But I am pigeon-liver'd and lack gall
    To make oppression bitter, or ere this
    I should have fatted all the region kites
    With this slave's offal. Bloody bawdy villain!
    Remorseless, treacherous, lecherous, kindless villain!
    O, vengeance!
    Why, what an ass am I! This is most brave,
    That I, the son of a dear father murther'd,
    Prompted to my revenge by heaven and hell,
    Must (like a whore) unpack my heart with words
    And fall a-cursing like a very drab,
    A scullion!
    Fie upon't! foh! About, my brain! Hum, I have heard
    That guilty creatures, sitting at a play,
    Have by the very cunning of the scene
    Been struck so to the soul that presently
    They have proclaim'd their malefactions;
    For murther, though it have no tongue, will speak
    With most miraculous organ, I'll have these Players
    Play something like the murther of my father
    Before mine uncle. I'll observe his looks;
    I'll tent him to the quick. If he but blench,
    I know my course. The spirit that I have seen
    May be a devil; and the devil hath power
    T' assume a pleasing shape; yea, and perhaps
    Out of my weakness and my melancholy,
    As he is very potent with such spirits,
    Abuses me to damn me. I'll have grounds
    More relative than this. The play's the thing
    Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King. Exit.

    (stage directions). Enter King, Queen, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern,

34 III, 1, 1682
  • and Lords.
  • and Lords.
  • (stage directions). Enter King, Queen, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern,

    (stage directions). and Lords.

35 III, 1, 1714
  • Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • Rosencrantz. We shall, my lord.

    (stage directions). Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

36 III, 1, 1732
  • [Exit Queen.]
  • [Exit Queen.]
  • Ophelia. Madam, I wish it may.

    (stage directions). [Exit Queen.]

37 III, 1, 1747
  • Exeunt King and Polonius].
  • Exeunt King and Polonius].
  • Polonius. I hear him coming. Let's withdraw, my lord.

    (stage directions). Exeunt King and Polonius].

38 III, 1, 1748
  • Enter Hamlet.
  • Enter Hamlet.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt King and Polonius].

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet.

39 III, 1, 1853
  • Enter King and Polonius.
  • Enter King and Polonius.
  • Ophelia. O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!
    The courtier's, scholar's, soldier's, eye, tongue, sword,
    Th' expectancy and rose of the fair state,
    The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
    Th' observ'd of all observers- quite, quite down!
    And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,
    That suck'd the honey of his music vows,
    Now see that noble and most sovereign reason,
    Like sweet bells jangled, out of tune and harsh;
    That unmatch'd form and feature of blown youth
    Blasted with ecstasy. O, woe is me
    T' have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

    (stage directions). Enter King and Polonius.

40 III, 2, 1882
  • Enter Hamlet and three of the Players.
  • Enter Hamlet and three of the Players.
  • Claudius. It shall be so.
    Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go. Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet and three of the Players.

41 III, 2, 1928
  • Exeunt they two.
  • Exeunt they two.
  • Rosencrantz. [with Guildenstern] We will, my lord.

    (stage directions). Exeunt they two.

42 III, 2, 1930
  • Enter Horatio.
  • Enter Horatio.
  • Hamlet. What, ho, Horatio!

    (stage directions). Enter Horatio.

43 III, 2, 1993
  • [Sits down at Ophelia's feet.]
  • [Sits down at Ophelia's feet.]
  • Hamlet. Lady, shall I lie in your lap?

    (stage directions). [Sits down at Ophelia's feet.]

44 III, 2, 2028
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Hamlet. So long? Nay then, let the devil wear black, for I'll have a
    suit of sables. O heavens! die two months ago, and not forgotten
    yet? Then there's hope a great man's memory may outlive his life
    half a year. But, by'r Lady, he must build churches then; or else
    shall he suffer not thinking on, with the hobby-horse, whose
    epitaph is 'For O, for O, the hobby-horse is forgot!'
    [Hautboys play. The dumb show enters.]
    Enter a King and a Queen very lovingly; the Queen embracing
    him and he her. She kneels, and makes show of protestation
    unto him. He takes her up, and declines his head upon her
    neck. He lays him down upon a bank of flowers. She, seeing
    him asleep, leaves him. Anon comes in a fellow, takes off his
    crown, kisses it, pours poison in the sleeper's ears, and
    leaves him. The Queen returns, finds the King dead, and makes
    passionate action. The Poisoner with some three or four Mutes,
    comes in again, seem to condole with her. The dead body is
    carried away. The Poisoner wooes the Queen with gifts; she
    seems harsh and unwilling awhile, but in the end accepts
    his love.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

45 III, 2, 2032
  • Enter Prologue.
  • Enter Prologue.
  • Ophelia. Belike this show imports the argument of the play.

    (stage directions). Enter Prologue.

46 III, 2, 2045
  • Enter [two Players as] King and Queen.
  • Enter [two Players as] King and Queen.
  • Hamlet. As woman's love.

    (stage directions). Enter [two Players as] King and Queen.

47 III, 2, 2121
  • He sleeps.]
  • He sleeps.]
  • Player Queen. Sleep rock thy brain,

    (stage directions). He sleeps.]

48 III, 2, 2123
  • Exit.
  • Exit.
  • Player Queen. And never come mischance between us twain!

    (stage directions). Exit.

49 III, 2, 2137
  • Enter Lucianus.This is one Lucianus, nephew to the King.
  • Enter Lucianus.This is one Lucianus, nephew to the King.
  • Hamlet. 'The Mousetrap.' Marry, how? Tropically. This play is the
    image of a murther done in Vienna. Gonzago is the duke's name;
    his wife, Baptista. You shall see anon. 'Tis a knavish piece of
    work; but what o' that? Your Majesty, and we that have free
    souls, it touches us not. Let the gall'd jade winch; our withers
    are unwrung.

    (stage directions). Enter Lucianus.This is one Lucianus, nephew to the King.

50 III, 2, 2148
  • Pours the poison in his ears.
  • Pours the poison in his ears.
  • Hamlet. So you must take your husbands.- Begin, murtherer. Pox, leave
    thy damnable faces, and begin! Come, the croaking raven doth
    bellow for revenge.
    Luc. Thoughts black, hands apt, drugs fit, and time agreeing; Confederate season, else no creature seeing; Thou mixture rank, of midnight weeds collected, With Hecate's ban thrice blasted, thrice infected, Thy natural magic and dire property On wholesome life usurp immediately.

    (stage directions). Pours the poison in his ears.

51 III, 2, 2158
  • Exeunt all but Hamlet and Horatio.
  • Exeunt all but Hamlet and Horatio.
  • All. Lights, lights, lights!

    (stage directions). Exeunt all but Hamlet and Horatio.

52 III, 3, 2276
  • Enter King, Rosencrantz, and Guildenstern.
  • Enter King, Rosencrantz, and Guildenstern.
  • Hamlet. 'By-and-by' is easily said.- Leave me, friends.
    [Exeunt all but Hamlet.]
    'Tis now the very witching time of night,
    When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out
    Contagion to this world. Now could I drink hot blood
    And do such bitter business as the day
    Would quake to look on. Soft! now to my mother!
    O heart, lose not thy nature; let not ever
    The soul of Nero enter this firm bosom.
    Let me be cruel, not unnatural;
    I will speak daggers to her, but use none.
    My tongue and soul in this be hypocrites-
    How in my words somever she be shent,
    To give them seals never, my soul, consent! Exit.

    (stage directions). Enter King, Rosencrantz, and Guildenstern.

53 III, 3, 2305
  • Exeunt Gentlemen.
  • Exeunt Gentlemen.
  • Rosencrantz. [with Guildenstern] We will haste us.

    (stage directions). Exeunt Gentlemen.

54 III, 3, 2306
  • Enter Polonius.
  • Enter Polonius.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt Gentlemen.

    (stage directions). Enter Polonius.

55 III, 3, 2355
  • Enter Hamlet.
  • Enter Hamlet.
  • Claudius. Thanks, dear my lord.
    [Exit [Polonius].]
    O, my offence is rank, it smells to heaven;
    It hath the primal eldest curse upon't,
    A brother's murther! Pray can I not,
    Though inclination be as sharp as will.
    My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent,
    And, like a man to double business bound,
    I stand in pause where I shall first begin,
    And both neglect. What if this cursed hand
    Were thicker than itself with brother's blood,
    Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens
    To wash it white as snow? Whereto serves mercy
    But to confront the visage of offence?
    And what's in prayer but this twofold force,
    To be forestalled ere we come to fall,
    Or pardon'd being down? Then I'll look up;
    My fault is past. But, O, what form of prayer
    Can serve my turn? 'Forgive me my foul murther'?
    That cannot be; since I am still possess'd
    Of those effects for which I did the murther-
    My crown, mine own ambition, and my queen.
    May one be pardon'd and retain th' offence?
    In the corrupted currents of this world
    Offence's gilded hand may shove by justice,
    And oft 'tis seen the wicked prize itself
    Buys out the law; but 'tis not so above.
    There is no shuffling; there the action lies
    In his true nature, and we ourselves compell'd,
    Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults,
    To give in evidence. What then? What rests?
    Try what repentance can. What can it not?
    Yet what can it when one cannot repent?
    O wretched state! O bosom black as death!
    O limed soul, that, struggling to be free,
    Art more engag'd! Help, angels! Make assay.
    Bow, stubborn knees; and heart with strings of steel,
    Be soft as sinews of the new-born babe!
    All may be well. He kneels.

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet.

56 III, 4, 2382
  • Enter Queen and Polonius.
  • Enter Queen and Polonius.
  • Claudius. [rises] My words fly up, my thoughts remain below.
    Words without thoughts never to heaven go. Exit.

    (stage directions). Enter Queen and Polonius.

57 III, 4, 2390
  • [Polonius hides behind the arras.]
  • [Polonius hides behind the arras.]
  • Gertrude. I'll warrant you; fear me not. Withdraw; I hear him coming.

    (stage directions). [Polonius hides behind the arras.]

58 III, 4, 2391
  • Enter Hamlet.
  • Enter Hamlet.
  • (stage directions). [Polonius hides behind the arras.]

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet.

59 III, 4, 2411
  • [Makes a pass through the arras and] kills Polonius.
  • [Makes a pass through the arras and] kills Polonius.
  • Hamlet. [draws] How now? a rat? Dead for a ducat, dead!

    (stage directions). [Makes a pass through the arras and] kills Polonius.

60 III, 4, 2499
  • Enter the Ghost in his nightgown.
  • Enter the Ghost in his nightgown.
  • Gertrude. No more!

    (stage directions). Enter the Ghost in his nightgown.

61 III, 4, 2538
  • Exit Ghost.
  • Exit Ghost.
  • Hamlet. Why, look you there! Look how it steals away!
    My father, in his habit as he liv'd!
    Look where he goes even now out at the portal!

    (stage directions). Exit Ghost.

62 III, 4, 2623
  • [Exit the Queen. Then] Exit Hamlet, tugging in
  • [Exit the Queen. Then] Exit Hamlet, tugging in
  • Hamlet. There's letters seal'd; and my two schoolfellows,
    Whom I will trust as I will adders fang'd,
    They bear the mandate; they must sweep my way
    And marshal me to knavery. Let it work;
    For 'tis the sport to have the enginer
    Hoist with his own petar; and 't shall go hard
    But I will delve one yard below their mines
    And blow them at the moon. O, 'tis most sweet
    When in one line two crafts directly meet.
    This man shall set me packing.
    I'll lug the guts into the neighbour room.-
    Mother, good night.- Indeed, this counsellor
    Is now most still, most secret, and most grave,
    Who was in life a foolish peating knave.
    Come, sir, to draw toward an end with you.
    Good night, mother.

    (stage directions). [Exit the Queen. Then] Exit Hamlet, tugging in

63 III, 4, 2624
  • Polonius.
  • Polonius.
  • (stage directions). [Exit the Queen. Then] Exit Hamlet, tugging in

    (stage directions). Polonius.

64 IV, 1, 2625
  • Enter King and Queen, with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • Enter King and Queen, with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • (stage directions). Polonius.

    (stage directions). Enter King and Queen, with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

65 IV, 1, 2675
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Claudius. O Gertrude, come away!
    The sun no sooner shall the mountains touch
    But we will ship him hence; and this vile deed
    We must with all our majesty and skill
    Both countenance and excuse. Ho, Guildenstern!
    [Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.]
    Friends both, go join you with some further aid.
    Hamlet in madness hath Polonius slain,
    And from his mother's closet hath he dragg'd him.
    Go seek him out; speak fair, and bring the body
    Into the chapel. I pray you haste in this.
    [Exeunt [Rosencrantz and Guildenstern].]
    Come, Gertrude, we'll call up our wisest friends
    And let them know both what we mean to do
    And what's untimely done. [So haply slander-]
    Whose whisper o'er the world's diameter,
    As level as the cannon to his blank,
    Transports his poisoned shot- may miss our name
    And hit the woundless air.- O, come away!
    My soul is full of discord and dismay.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

66 IV, 2, 2676
  • Enter Hamlet.
  • Enter Hamlet.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet.

67 IV, 2, 2680
  • come.
  • come.
  • Hamlet. But soft! What noise? Who calls on Hamlet? O, here they

    (stage directions). come.

68 IV, 2, 2681
  • Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
  • (stage directions). come.

    (stage directions). Enter Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

69 IV, 2, 2706
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Hamlet. Of nothing. Bring me to him. Hide fox, and all after.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

70 IV, 3, 2707
  • Enter King.
  • Enter King.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter King.

71 IV, 3, 2727
  • Enter Hamlet and Guildenstern [with Attendants].
  • Enter Hamlet and Guildenstern [with Attendants].
  • Rosencrantz. Ho, Guildenstern! Bring in my lord.

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet and Guildenstern [with Attendants].

72 IV, 3, 2750
  • [Exeunt Attendants.]
  • [Exeunt Attendants.]
  • Hamlet. He will stay till you come.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt Attendants.]

73 IV, 3, 2767
  • Exit.
  • Exit.
  • Hamlet. My mother! Father and mother is man and wife; man and wife is
    one flesh; and so, my mother. Come, for England!

    (stage directions). Exit.

74 IV, 4, 2784
  • Enter Fortinbras with his Army over the stage.
  • Enter Fortinbras with his Army over the stage.
  • Claudius. Follow him at foot; tempt him with speed aboard.
    Delay it not; I'll have him hence to-night.
    Away! for everything is seal'd and done
    That else leans on th' affair. Pray you make haste.
    [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern]
    And, England, if my love thou hold'st at aught,-
    As my great power thereof may give thee sense,
    Since yet thy cicatrice looks raw and red
    After the Danish sword, and thy free awe
    Pays homage to us,- thou mayst not coldly set
    Our sovereign process, which imports at full,
    By letters congruing to that effect,
    The present death of Hamlet. Do it, England;
    For like the hectic in my blood he rages,
    And thou must cure me. Till I know 'tis done,
    Howe'er my haps, my joys were ne'er begun. Exit.

    (stage directions). Enter Fortinbras with his Army over the stage.

75 IV, 4, 2794
  • Exeunt [all but the Captain].
  • Exeunt [all but the Captain].
  • Fortinbras. Go softly on.

    (stage directions). Exeunt [all but the Captain].

76 IV, 4, 2795
  • Enter Hamlet, Rosencrantz, [Guildenstern,] and others.
  • Enter Hamlet, Rosencrantz, [Guildenstern,] and others.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt [all but the Captain].

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet, Rosencrantz, [Guildenstern,] and others.

77 IV, 5, 2856
  • Enter Horatio, Queen, and a Gentleman.
  • Enter Horatio, Queen, and a Gentleman.
  • Hamlet. I'll be with you straight. Go a little before.
    [Exeunt all but Hamlet.]
    How all occasions do inform against me
    And spur my dull revenge! What is a man,
    If his chief good and market of his time
    Be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more.
    Sure he that made us with such large discourse,
    Looking before and after, gave us not
    That capability and godlike reason
    To fust in us unus'd. Now, whether it be
    Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple
    Of thinking too precisely on th' event,-
    A thought which, quarter'd, hath but one part wisdom
    And ever three parts coward,- I do not know
    Why yet I live to say 'This thing's to do,'
    Sith I have cause, and will, and strength, and means
    To do't. Examples gross as earth exhort me.
    Witness this army of such mass and charge,
    Led by a delicate and tender prince,
    Whose spirit, with divine ambition puff'd,
    Makes mouths at the invisible event,
    Exposing what is mortal and unsure
    To all that fortune, death, and danger dare,
    Even for an eggshell. Rightly to be great
    Is not to stir without great argument,
    But greatly to find quarrel in a straw
    When honour's at the stake. How stand I then,
    That have a father kill'd, a mother stain'd,
    Excitements of my reason and my blood,
    And let all sleep, while to my shame I see
    The imminent death of twenty thousand men
    That for a fantasy and trick of fame
    Go to their graves like beds, fight for a plot
    Whereon the numbers cannot try the cause,
    Which is not tomb enough and continent
    To hide the slain? O, from this time forth,
    My thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth! Exit.

    (stage directions). Enter Horatio, Queen, and a Gentleman.

78 IV, 5, 2879
  • Enter Ophelia distracted.
  • Enter Ophelia distracted.
  • Gertrude. Let her come in.
    [Exit Gentleman.]
    [Aside] To my sick soul (as sin's true nature is)
    Each toy seems Prologue to some great amiss.
    So full of artless jealousy is guilt
    It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.

    (stage directions). Enter Ophelia distracted.

79 IV, 5, 2897
  • Enter King.
  • Enter King.
  • Ophelia. Pray you mark.
    (Sings) White his shroud as the mountain snow-

    (stage directions). Enter King.

80 IV, 5, 2973
  • A noise within.
  • A noise within.
  • Messenger. Save Yourself, my lord:
    The ocean, overpeering of his list,
    Eats not the flats with more impetuous haste
    Than Young Laertes, in a riotous head,
    O'erbears Your offices. The rabble call him lord;
    And, as the world were now but to begin,
    Antiquity forgot, custom not known,
    The ratifiers and props of every word,
    They cry 'Choose we! Laertes shall be king!'
    Caps, hands, and tongues applaud it to the clouds,
    'Laertes shall be king! Laertes king!'

    (stage directions). A noise within.

81 IV, 5, 2977
  • Enter Laertes with others.
  • Enter Laertes with others.
  • Claudius. The doors are broke.

    (stage directions). Enter Laertes with others.

82 IV, 5, 3029
  • A noise within: 'Let her come in.'
  • A noise within: 'Let her come in.'
  • Claudius. Why, now You speak
    Like a good child and a true gentleman.
    That I am guiltless of your father's death,
    And am most sensibly in grief for it,
    It shall as level to your judgment pierce
    As day does to your eye.

    (stage directions). A noise within: 'Let her come in.'

83 IV, 5, 3076
  • Exit.
  • Exit.
  • Ophelia. [sings]
    And will he not come again?
    And will he not come again?
    No, no, he is dead;
    Go to thy deathbed;
    He never will come again.
    His beard was as white as snow,
    All flaxen was his poll.
    He is gone, he is gone,
    And we cast away moan.
    God 'a'mercy on his soul!
    And of all Christian souls, I pray God. God b' wi' you.

    (stage directions). Exit.

84 IV, 5, 3098
  • Exeunt
  • Exeunt
  • Claudius. So you shall;
    And where th' offence is let the great axe fall.
    I pray you go with me.

    (stage directions). Exeunt

85 IV, 6, 3099
  • Enter Horatio with an Attendant.
  • Enter Horatio with an Attendant.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt

    (stage directions). Enter Horatio with an Attendant.

86 IV, 6, 3106
  • Enter Sailors.
  • Enter Sailors.
  • Horatio. Let them come in.
    [Exit Attendant.]
    I do not know from what part of the world
    I should be greeted, if not from Lord Hamlet.

    (stage directions). Enter Sailors.

87 IV, 7, 3130
  • Enter King and Laertes.
  • Enter King and Laertes.
  • Horatio. [reads the letter] 'Horatio, when thou shalt have overlook'd
    this, give these fellows some means to the King. They have
    letters for him. Ere we were two days old at sea, a pirate of
    very warlike appointment gave us chase. Finding ourselves too
    slow of sail, we put on a compelled valour, and in the grapple I
    boarded them. On the instant they got clear of our ship; so I
    alone became their prisoner. They have dealt with me like thieves
    of mercy; but they knew what they did: I am to do a good turn for
    them. Let the King have the letters I have sent, and repair thou
    to me with as much speed as thou wouldst fly death. I have words
    to speak in thine ear will make thee dumb; yet are they much too
    light for the bore of the matter. These good fellows will bring
    thee where I am. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern hold their course
    for England. Of them I have much to tell thee. Farewell.
    'He that thou knowest thine, HAMLET.'
    Come, I will give you way for these your letters,
    And do't the speedier that you may direct me
    To him from whom you brought them. Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter King and Laertes.

88 IV, 7, 3346
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Claudius. Let's follow, Gertrude.
    How much I had to do to calm his rage I
    Now fear I this will give it start again;
    Therefore let's follow.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

89 V, 1, 3347
  • Enter two Clowns, [with spades and pickaxes].
  • Enter two Clowns, [with spades and pickaxes].
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter two Clowns, [with spades and pickaxes].

90 V, 1, 3395
  • Enter Hamlet and Horatio afar off.
  • Enter Hamlet and Horatio afar off.
  • Second Clown. Mass, I cannot tell.

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet and Horatio afar off.

91 V, 1, 3401
  • [Exit Second Clown.]
  • [Exit Second Clown.]
  • First Clown. Cudgel thy brains no more about it, for your dull ass will
    not mend his pace with beating; and when you are ask'd this
    question next, say 'a grave-maker.' The houses he makes lasts
    till doomsday. Go, get thee to Yaughan; fetch me a stoup of
    liquor.

    (stage directions). [Exit Second Clown.]

92 V, 1, 3402
  • [Clown digs and] sings.
  • [Clown digs and] sings.
  • (stage directions). [Exit Second Clown.]

    (stage directions). [Clown digs and] sings.

93 V, 1, 3417
  • [Throws up a skull.]
  • [Throws up a skull.]
  • First Clown. [sings]
    But age with his stealing steps
    Hath clawed me in his clutch,
    And hath shipped me intil the land,
    As if I had never been such.

    (stage directions). [Throws up a skull.]

94 V, 1, 3530
  • [Puts down the skull.]
  • [Puts down the skull.]
  • Hamlet. And smelt so? Pah!

    (stage directions). [Puts down the skull.]

95 V, 1, 3553
  • [Retires with Horatio.]
  • [Retires with Horatio.]
  • Hamlet. No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither with modesty
    enough, and likelihood to lead it; as thus: Alexander died,
    Alexander was buried, Alexander returneth into dust; the dust is
    earth; of earth we make loam; and why of that loam (whereto he
    was converted) might they not stop a beer barrel?
    Imperious Caesar, dead and turn'd to clay,
    Might stop a hole to keep the wind away.
    O, that that earth which kept the world in awe
    Should patch a wall t' expel the winter's flaw!
    But soft! but soft! aside! Here comes the King-
    Enter [priests with] a coffin [in funeral procession], King,
    [Queen, Laertes, with Lords attendant.]
    The Queen, the courtiers. Who is this they follow?
    And with such maimed rites? This doth betoken
    The corse they follow did with desp'rate hand
    Fordo it own life. 'Twas of some estate.
    Couch we awhile, and mark.

    (stage directions). [Retires with Horatio.]

96 V, 1, 3599
  • [Grapples with him.]
  • [Grapples with him.]
  • Laertes. The devil take thy soul!

    (stage directions). [Grapples with him.]

97 V, 1, 3609
  • [The Attendants part them, and they come out of the grave.]
  • [The Attendants part them, and they come out of the grave.]
  • Horatio. Good my lord, be quiet.

    (stage directions). [The Attendants part them, and they come out of the grave.]

98 V, 1, 3639
  • Exit.
  • Exit.
  • Hamlet. Hear you, sir!
    What is the reason that you use me thus?
    I lov'd you ever. But it is no matter.
    Let Hercules himself do what he may,
    The cat will mew, and dog will have his day.

    (stage directions). Exit.

99 V, 1, 3648
  • Exeunt.
  • Exeunt.
  • Claudius. I pray thee, good Horatio, wait upon him.
    [Exit Horatio.]
    [To Laertes] Strengthen your patience in our last night's speech.
    We'll put the matter to the present push.-
    Good Gertrude, set some watch over your son.-
    This grave shall have a living monument.
    An hour of quiet shortly shall we see;
    Till then in patience our proceeding be.

    (stage directions). Exeunt.

100 V, 2, 3649
  • Enter Hamlet and Horatio.
  • Enter Hamlet and Horatio.
  • (stage directions). Exeunt.

    (stage directions). Enter Hamlet and Horatio.

101 V, 2, 3736
  • Enter young Osric, a courtier.
  • Enter young Osric, a courtier.
  • Horatio. Peace! Who comes here?

    (stage directions). Enter young Osric, a courtier.

102 V, 2, 3757
  • [Hamlet moves him to put on his hat.]
  • [Hamlet moves him to put on his hat.]
  • Hamlet. I beseech you remember.

    (stage directions). [Hamlet moves him to put on his hat.]

103 V, 2, 3830
  • Enter a Lord.
  • Enter a Lord.
  • Hamlet. He did comply with his dug before he suck'd it. Thus has he,
    and many more of the same bevy that I know the drossy age dotes
    on, only got the tune of the time and outward habit of encounter-
    a kind of yesty collection, which carries them through and
    through the most fann'd and winnowed opinions; and do but blow
    them to their trial-the bubbles are out,

    (stage directions). Enter a Lord.

104 V, 2, 3843
  • [Exit Lord.]
  • [Exit Lord.]
  • Hamlet. She well instructs me.

    (stage directions). [Exit Lord.]

105 V, 2, 3858
  • Enter King, Queen, Laertes, Osric, and Lords, with other
  • Enter King, Queen, Laertes, Osric, and Lords, with other
  • Hamlet. Not a whit, we defy augury; there's a special providence in
    the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, 'tis not to come; if it be
    not to come, it will be now; if it be not now, yet it will come:
    the readiness is all. Since no man knows aught of what he leaves,
    what is't to leave betimes? Let be.

    (stage directions). Enter King, Queen, Laertes, Osric, and Lords, with other

106 V, 2, 3859
  • Attendants with foils and gauntlets.
  • Attendants with foils and gauntlets.
  • (stage directions). Enter King, Queen, Laertes, Osric, and Lords, with other

    (stage directions). Attendants with foils and gauntlets.

107 V, 2, 3860
  • A table and flagons of wine on it.
  • A table and flagons of wine on it.
  • (stage directions). Attendants with foils and gauntlets.

    (stage directions). A table and flagons of wine on it.

108 V, 2, 3862
  • [The King puts Laertes' hand into Hamlet's.]
  • [The King puts Laertes' hand into Hamlet's.]
  • Claudius. Come, Hamlet, come, and take this hand from me.

    (stage directions). [The King puts Laertes' hand into Hamlet's.]

109 V, 2, 3908
  • Prepare to play.
  • Prepare to play.
  • Hamlet. This likes me well. These foils have all a length?

    (stage directions). Prepare to play.

110 V, 2, 3956
  • [Laertes wounds Hamlet; then] in scuffling, they change rapiers, [and...
  • [Laertes wounds Hamlet; then] in scuffling, they change rapiers, [and Hamlet wounds Laertes].
  • Laertes. Have at you now!

    (stage directions). [Laertes wounds Hamlet; then] in scuffling, they change rapiers, [and Hamlet wounds Laertes].

111 V, 2, 3969
  • [Laertes falls.]
  • [Laertes falls.]
  • Hamlet. O villany! Ho! let the door be lock'd.
    Treachery! Seek it out.

    (stage directions). [Laertes falls.]

112 V, 2, 4073
  • Exeunt marching; after the which a peal of ordnance are shot off.
  • Exeunt marching; after the which a peal of ordnance are shot off.
  • Fortinbras. Let four captains
    Bear Hamlet like a soldier to the stage;
    For he was likely, had he been put on,
    To have prov'd most royally; and for his passage
    The soldiers' music and the rites of war
    Speak loudly for him.
    Take up the bodies. Such a sight as this
    Becomes the field but here shows much amiss.
    Go, bid the soldiers shoot.

    (stage directions). Exeunt marching; after the which a peal of ordnance are shot off.

113 V, 2, 4074
  • THE END
  • THE END
  • (stage directions). Exeunt marching; after the which a peal of ordnance are shot off.

    (stage directions). THE END

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