Speeches (Lines) for (stage directions) in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 76
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 1
  • [Enter FERDINAND king of Navarre, BIRON, LONGAVILLE]
    and DUMAIN]
  • [Enter FERDINAND king of Navarre, BIRON, LONGAVILLE]
    and DUMAIN]
  • .

    (stage directions). [Enter FERDINAND king of Navarre, BIRON, LONGAVILLE]
    and DUMAIN]

2 I, 1, 186
  • [Enter DULL with a letter, and COSTARD]
  • [Enter DULL with a letter, and COSTARD]
  • Longaville. Costard the swain and he shall be our sport;
    And so to study, three years is but short.

    (stage directions). [Enter DULL with a letter, and COSTARD]

3 I, 1, 299
  • [Exeunt FERDINAND, LONGAVILLE, and DUMAIN]
  • [Exeunt FERDINAND, LONGAVILLE, and DUMAIN]
  • Ferdinand. And Don Armado shall be your keeper.
    My Lord Biron, see him deliver'd o'er:
    And go we, lords, to put in practise that
    Which each to other hath so strongly sworn.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt FERDINAND, LONGAVILLE, and DUMAIN]

4 I, 1, 308
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Costard. I suffer for the truth, sir; for true it is, I was
    taken with Jaquenetta, and Jaquenetta is a true
    girl; and therefore welcome the sour cup of
    prosperity! Affliction may one day smile again; and
    till then, sit thee down, sorrow!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

5 I, 2, 309
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO and MOTH]
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO and MOTH]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO and MOTH]

6 I, 2, 423
  • [Enter DULL, COSTARD, and JAQUENETTA]
  • [Enter DULL, COSTARD, and JAQUENETTA]
  • Moth. Forbear till this company be past.

    (stage directions). [Enter DULL, COSTARD, and JAQUENETTA]

7 I, 2, 442
  • [Exeunt DULL and JAQUENETTA]
  • [Exeunt DULL and JAQUENETTA]
  • Dull. Come, Jaquenetta, away!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt DULL and JAQUENETTA]

8 I, 2, 462
  • [Exeunt MOTH and COSTARD]
  • [Exeunt MOTH and COSTARD]
  • Costard. Nay, nothing, Master Moth, but what they look upon.
    It is not for prisoners to be too silent in their
    words; and therefore I will say nothing: I thank
    God I have as little patience as another man; and
    therefore I can be quiet.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt MOTH and COSTARD]

9 I, 2, 482
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Don Adriano de Armado. I do affect the very ground, which is base, where
    her shoe, which is baser, guided by her foot, which
    is basest, doth tread. I shall be forsworn, which
    is a great argument of falsehood, if I love. And
    how can that be true love which is falsely
    attempted? Love is a familiar; Love is a devil:
    there is no evil angel but Love. Yet was Samson so
    tempted, and he had an excellent strength; yet was
    Solomon so seduced, and he had a very good wit.
    Cupid's butt-shaft is too hard for Hercules' club;
    and therefore too much odds for a Spaniard's rapier.
    The first and second cause will not serve my turn;
    the passado he respects not, the duello he regards
    not: his disgrace is to be called boy; but his
    glory is to subdue men. Adieu, valour! rust rapier!
    be still, drum! for your manager is in love; yea,
    he loveth. Assist me, some extemporal god of rhyme,
    for I am sure I shall turn sonnet. Devise, wit;
    write, pen; for I am for whole volumes in folio.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

10 II, 1, 483
  • [Enter the PRINCESS of France, ROSALINE, MARIA,]
    KATHARINE, BOYET, Lords, an...
  • [Enter the PRINCESS of France, ROSALINE, MARIA,]
    KATHARINE, BOYET, Lords, and other Attendants]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter the PRINCESS of France, ROSALINE, MARIA,]
    KATHARINE, BOYET, Lords, and other Attendants]

11 II, 1, 567
  • [Re-enter BOYET]
  • [Re-enter BOYET]
  • First Lord. Here comes Boyet.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter BOYET]

12 II, 1, 671
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Ferdinand. Thy own wish wish I thee in every place!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

13 II, 1, 685
  • [Retiring]
  • [Retiring]
  • Biron. I cannot stay thanksgiving.

    (stage directions). [Retiring]

14 II, 1, 689
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Dumain. A gallant lady. Monsieur, fare you well.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

15 II, 1, 702
  • [Exit LONGAVILLE]
  • [Exit LONGAVILLE]
  • Boyet. Not unlike, sir, that may be.

    (stage directions). [Exit LONGAVILLE]

16 II, 1, 709
  • [Exit BIRON]
  • [Exit BIRON]
  • Boyet. Farewell to me, sir, and welcome to you.

    (stage directions). [Exit BIRON]

17 II, 1, 720
  • [Offering to kiss her]
  • [Offering to kiss her]
  • Boyet. So you grant pasture for me.

    (stage directions). [Offering to kiss her]

18 II, 1, 763
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Boyet. You are too hard for me.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

19 III, 1, 764
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO and MOTH]
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO and MOTH]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO and MOTH]

20 III, 1, 767
  • [Singing]
  • [Singing]
  • Moth. Concolinel.

    (stage directions). [Singing]

21 III, 1, 827
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Moth. Thump then and I flee.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

22 III, 1, 832
  • [Re-enter MOTH with COSTARD]
  • [Re-enter MOTH with COSTARD]
  • Don Adriano de Armado. A most acute juvenal; voluble and free of grace!
    By thy favour, sweet welkin, I must sigh in thy face:
    Most rude melancholy, valour gives thee place.
    My herald is return'd.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter MOTH with COSTARD]

23 III, 1, 895
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Don Adriano de Armado. I give thee thy liberty, set thee from durance; and,
    in lieu thereof, impose on thee nothing but this:
    bear this significant
    [Giving a letter]
    to the country maid Jaquenetta:
    there is remuneration; for the best ward of mine
    honour is rewarding my dependents. Moth, follow.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

24 III, 1, 906
  • [Enter BIRON]
  • [Enter BIRON]
  • Costard. My sweet ounce of man's flesh! my incony Jew!
    [Exit MOTH]
    Now will I look to his remuneration. Remuneration!
    O, that's the Latin word for three farthings: three
    farthings--remuneration.--'What's the price of this
    inkle?'--'One penny.'--'No, I'll give you a
    remuneration:' why, it carries it. Remuneration!
    why, it is a fairer name than French crown. I will
    never buy and sell out of this word.

    (stage directions). [Enter BIRON]

25 III, 1, 932
  • [Giving him a shilling]
  • [Giving him a shilling]
  • Biron. It must be done this afternoon.
    Hark, slave, it is but this:
    The princess comes to hunt here in the park,
    And in her train there is a gentle lady;
    When tongues speak sweetly, then they name her name,
    And Rosaline they call her: ask for her;
    And to her white hand see thou do commend
    This seal'd-up counsel. There's thy guerdon; go.

    (stage directions). [Giving him a shilling]

26 III, 1, 936
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Costard. Gardon, O sweet gardon! better than remuneration,
    a'leven-pence farthing better: most sweet gardon! I
    will do it sir, in print. Gardon! Remuneration!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

27 III, 1, 969
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Biron. And I, forsooth, in love! I, that have been love's whip;
    A very beadle to a humorous sigh;
    A critic, nay, a night-watch constable;
    A domineering pedant o'er the boy;
    Than whom no mortal so magnificent!
    This whimpled, whining, purblind, wayward boy;
    This senior-junior, giant-dwarf, Dan Cupid;
    Regent of love-rhymes, lord of folded arms,
    The anointed sovereign of sighs and groans,
    Liege of all loiterers and malcontents,
    Dread prince of plackets, king of codpieces,
    Sole imperator and great general
    Of trotting 'paritors:--O my little heart:--
    And I to be a corporal of his field,
    And wear his colours like a tumbler's hoop!
    What, I! I love! I sue! I seek a wife!
    A woman, that is like a German clock,
    Still a-repairing, ever out of frame,
    And never going aright, being a watch,
    But being watch'd that it may still go right!
    Nay, to be perjured, which is worst of all;
    And, among three, to love the worst of all;
    A wightly wanton with a velvet brow,
    With two pitch-balls stuck in her face for eyes;
    Ay, and by heaven, one that will do the deed
    Though Argus were her eunuch and her guard:
    And I to sigh for her! to watch for her!
    To pray for her! Go to; it is a plague
    That Cupid will impose for my neglect
    Of his almighty dreadful little might.
    Well, I will love, write, sigh, pray, sue and groan:
    Some men must love my lady and some Joan.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

28 IV, 1, 970
  • [Enter the PRINCESS, and her train, a Forester,]
    BOYET, ROSALINE, MARIA, and...
  • [Enter the PRINCESS, and her train, a Forester,]
    BOYET, ROSALINE, MARIA, and KATHARINE]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter the PRINCESS, and her train, a Forester,]
    BOYET, ROSALINE, MARIA, and KATHARINE]

29 IV, 1, 1014
  • [Enter COSTARD]
  • [Enter COSTARD]
  • Boyet. Here comes a member of the commonwealth.

    (stage directions). [Enter COSTARD]

30 IV, 1, 1033
  • [Reads]
  • [Reads]
  • Princess of France. We will read it, I swear.
    Break the neck of the wax, and every one give ear.

    (stage directions). [Reads]

31 IV, 1, 1087
  • [Exeunt PRINCESS and train]
  • [Exeunt PRINCESS and train]
  • Princess of France. Thou hast mistaken his letter. Come, lords, away.
    [To ROSALINE]
    Here, sweet, put up this: 'twill be thine another day.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt PRINCESS and train]

32 IV, 1, 1113
  • [Exeunt ROSALINE and KATHARINE]
  • [Exeunt ROSALINE and KATHARINE]
  • Boyet. An I cannot, cannot, cannot,
    An I cannot, another can.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt ROSALINE and KATHARINE]

33 IV, 1, 1125
  • [Exeunt BOYET and MARIA]
  • [Exeunt BOYET and MARIA]
  • Boyet. I fear too much rubbing. Good night, my good owl.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt BOYET and MARIA]

34 IV, 1, 1139
  • [Shout within]
  • [Shout within]
  • Costard. By my soul, a swain! a most simple clown!
    Lord, Lord, how the ladies and I have put him down!
    O' my troth, most sweet jests! most incony
    vulgar wit!
    When it comes so smoothly off, so obscenely, as it
    were, so fit.
    Armado o' th' one side,--O, a most dainty man!
    To see him walk before a lady and to bear her fan!
    To see him kiss his hand! and how most sweetly a'
    will swear!
    And his page o' t' other side, that handful of wit!
    Ah, heavens, it is a most pathetical nit!
    Sola, sola!

    (stage directions). [Shout within]

35 IV, 1, 1140
  • [Exit COSTARD, running]
  • [Exit COSTARD, running]
  • (stage directions). [Shout within]

    (stage directions). [Exit COSTARD, running]

36 IV, 2, 1141
  • [Enter HOLOFERNES, SIR NATHANIEL, and DULL]
  • [Enter HOLOFERNES, SIR NATHANIEL, and DULL]
  • (stage directions). [Exit COSTARD, running]

    (stage directions). [Enter HOLOFERNES, SIR NATHANIEL, and DULL]

37 IV, 2, 1229
  • [Enter JAQUENETTA and COSTARD]
  • [Enter JAQUENETTA and COSTARD]
  • Holofernes. Mehercle, if their sons be ingenuous, they shall
    want no instruction; if their daughters be capable,
    I will put it to them: but vir sapit qui pauca
    loquitur; a soul feminine saluteth us.

    (stage directions). [Enter JAQUENETTA and COSTARD]

38 IV, 2, 1295
  • [Exeunt COSTARD and JAQUENETTA]
  • [Exeunt COSTARD and JAQUENETTA]
  • Costard. Have with thee, my girl.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt COSTARD and JAQUENETTA]

39 IV, 2, 1317
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Holofernes. And, certes, the text most infallibly concludes it.
    [To DULL]
    Sir, I do invite you too; you shall not
    say me nay: pauca verba. Away! the gentles are at
    their game, and we will to our recreation.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

40 IV, 3, 1318
  • [Enter BIRON, with a paper]
  • [Enter BIRON, with a paper]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter BIRON, with a paper]

41 IV, 3, 1339
  • [Stands aside]
  • [Stands aside]
  • Biron. The king he is hunting the deer; I am coursing
    myself: they have pitched a toil; I am toiling in
    a pitch,--pitch that defiles: defile! a foul
    word. Well, set thee down, sorrow! for so they say
    the fool said, and so say I, and I the fool: well
    proved, wit! By the Lord, this love is as mad as
    Ajax: it kills sheep; it kills me, I a sheep:
    well proved again o' my side! I will not love: if
    I do, hang me; i' faith, I will not. O, but her
    eye,--by this light, but for her eye, I would not
    love her; yes, for her two eyes. Well, I do nothing
    in the world but lie, and lie in my throat. By
    heaven, I do love: and it hath taught me to rhyme
    and to be melancholy; and here is part of my rhyme,
    and here my melancholy. Well, she hath one o' my
    sonnets already: the clown bore it, the fool sent
    it, and the lady hath it: sweet clown, sweeter
    fool, sweetest lady! By the world, I would not care
    a pin, if the other three were in. Here comes one
    with a paper: God give him grace to groan!

    (stage directions). [Stands aside]

42 IV, 3, 1340
  • [Enter FERDINAND, with a paper]
  • [Enter FERDINAND, with a paper]
  • (stage directions). [Stands aside]

    (stage directions). [Enter FERDINAND, with a paper]

43 IV, 3, 1367
  • [Enter LONGAVILLE, with a paper]
  • [Enter LONGAVILLE, with a paper]
  • Biron. Now, in thy likeness, one more fool appear!

    (stage directions). [Enter LONGAVILLE, with a paper]

44 IV, 3, 1401
  • [Steps aside]
  • [Steps aside]
  • Longaville. By whom shall I send this?--Company! stay.

    (stage directions). [Steps aside]

45 IV, 3, 1522
  • [Enter JAQUENETTA and COSTARD]
  • [Enter JAQUENETTA and COSTARD]
  • Biron. I post from love: good lover, let me go.

    (stage directions). [Enter JAQUENETTA and COSTARD]

46 IV, 3, 1538
  • [BIRON tears the letter]
  • [BIRON tears the letter]
  • Costard. Of Dun Adramadio, Dun Adramadio.

    (stage directions). [BIRON tears the letter]

47 IV, 3, 1543
  • [Gathering up the pieces]
  • [Gathering up the pieces]
  • Dumain. It is Biron's writing, and here is his name.

    (stage directions). [Gathering up the pieces]

48 IV, 3, 1557
  • [Exeunt COSTARD and JAQUENETTA]
  • [Exeunt COSTARD and JAQUENETTA]
  • Costard. Walk aside the true folk, and let the traitors stay.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt COSTARD and JAQUENETTA]

49 IV, 3, 1732
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Biron. Allons! allons! Sow'd cockle reap'd no corn;
    And justice always whirls in equal measure:
    Light wenches may prove plagues to men forsworn;
    If so, our copper buys no better treasure.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

50 V, 1, 1733
  • [Enter HOLOFERNES, SIR NATHANIEL, and DULL]
  • [Enter HOLOFERNES, SIR NATHANIEL, and DULL]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter HOLOFERNES, SIR NATHANIEL, and DULL]

51 V, 1, 1749
  • [Draws out his table-book]
  • [Draws out his table-book]
  • Sir Nathaniel. A most singular and choice epithet.

    (stage directions). [Draws out his table-book]

52 V, 1, 1766
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO, MOTH, and COSTARD]
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO, MOTH, and COSTARD]
  • Holofernes. Video, et gaudeo.

    (stage directions). [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO, MOTH, and COSTARD]

53 V, 1, 1768
  • [To MOTH]
  • [To MOTH]
  • Don Adriano de Armado. Chirrah!

    (stage directions). [To MOTH]

54 V, 1, 1879
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Holofernes. Most dull, honest Dull! To our sport, away!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

55 V, 2, 1880
  • [Enter the PRINCESS, KATHARINE, ROSALINE, and MARIA]
  • [Enter the PRINCESS, KATHARINE, ROSALINE, and MARIA]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter the PRINCESS, KATHARINE, ROSALINE, and MARIA]

56 V, 2, 1962
  • [Enter BOYET]
  • [Enter BOYET]
  • Princess of France. Here comes Boyet, and mirth is in his face.

    (stage directions). [Enter BOYET]

57 V, 2, 2041
  • [Trumpets sound within]
  • [Trumpets sound within]
  • Princess of France. Therefore I do it; and I make no doubt
    The rest will ne'er come in, if he be out
    There's no such sport as sport by sport o'erthrown,
    To make theirs ours and ours none but our own:
    So shall we stay, mocking intended game,
    And they, well mock'd, depart away with shame.

    (stage directions). [Trumpets sound within]

58 V, 2, 2064
  • [Exit MOTH]
  • [Exit MOTH]
  • Biron. Is this your perfectness? be gone, you rogue!

    (stage directions). [Exit MOTH]

59 V, 2, 2127
  • [They converse apart]
  • [They converse apart]
  • Ferdinand. I am best pleased with that.

    (stage directions). [They converse apart]

60 V, 2, 2140
  • [They converse apart]
  • [They converse apart]
  • Biron. Therefore meet.

    (stage directions). [They converse apart]

61 V, 2, 2148
  • [They converse apart]
  • [They converse apart]
  • Dumain. Please it you,
    As much in private, and I'll bid adieu.

    (stage directions). [They converse apart]

62 V, 2, 2165
  • [They converse apart]
  • [They converse apart]
  • Katharine. Bleat softly then; the butcher hears you cry.

    (stage directions). [They converse apart]

63 V, 2, 2232
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Boyet. I will; and so will she, I know, my lord.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

64 V, 2, 2442
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Costard. We will turn it finely off, sir; we will take
    some care.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

65 V, 2, 2454
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO]
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO]
  • Biron. A right description of our sport, my lord.

    (stage directions). [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO]

66 V, 2, 2457
  • [Converses apart with FERDINAND, and delivers him a paper]
  • [Converses apart with FERDINAND, and delivers him a paper]
  • Don Adriano de Armado. Anointed, I implore so much expense of thy royal
    sweet breath as will utter a brace of words.

    (stage directions). [Converses apart with FERDINAND, and delivers him a paper]

67 V, 2, 2466
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Don Adriano de Armado. That is all one, my fair, sweet, honey monarch; for,
    I protest, the schoolmaster is exceeding
    fantastical; too, too vain, too too vain: but we
    will put it, as they say, to fortuna de la guerra.
    I wish you the peace of mind, most royal couplement!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

68 V, 2, 2480
  • [Enter COSTARD, for Pompey]
  • [Enter COSTARD, for Pompey]
  • Ferdinand. The ship is under sail, and here she comes amain.

    (stage directions). [Enter COSTARD, for Pompey]

69 V, 2, 2500
  • [Enter SIR NATHANIEL, for Alexander]
  • [Enter SIR NATHANIEL, for Alexander]
  • Biron. My hat to a halfpenny, Pompey proves the best Worthy.

    (stage directions). [Enter SIR NATHANIEL, for Alexander]

70 V, 2, 2528
  • [Enter HOLOFERNES, for Judas; and MOTH, for Hercules]
  • [Enter HOLOFERNES, for Judas; and MOTH, for Hercules]
  • Costard. [To SIR NATHANIEL] O, sir, you have overthrown
    Alisander the conqueror! You will be scraped out of
    the painted cloth for this: your lion, that holds
    his poll-axe sitting on a close-stool, will be given
    to Ajax: he will be the ninth Worthy. A conqueror,
    and afeard to speak! run away for shame, Alisander.
    [SIR NATHANIEL retires]
    There, an't shall please you; a foolish mild man; an
    honest man, look you, and soon dashed. He is a
    marvellous good neighbour, faith, and a very good
    bowler: but, for Alisander,--alas, you see how
    'tis,--a little o'erparted. But there are Worthies
    a-coming will speak their mind in some other sort.

    (stage directions). [Enter HOLOFERNES, for Judas; and MOTH, for Hercules]

71 V, 2, 2572
  • [HOLOFERNES retires]
  • [HOLOFERNES retires]
  • Boyet. A light for Monsieur Judas! it grows dark, he may stumble.

    (stage directions). [HOLOFERNES retires]

72 V, 2, 2574
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO, for Hector]
  • [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO, for Hector]
  • Princess of France. Alas, poor Maccabaeus, how hath he been baited!

    (stage directions). [Enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO, for Hector]

73 V, 2, 2654
  • [Enter MERCADE]
  • [Enter MERCADE]
  • Boyet. True, and it was enjoined him in Rome for want of
    linen: since when, I'll be sworn, he wore none but
    a dishclout of Jaquenetta's, and that a' wears next
    his heart for a favour.

    (stage directions). [Enter MERCADE]

74 V, 2, 2666
  • [Exeunt Worthies]
  • [Exeunt Worthies]
  • Don Adriano de Armado. For mine own part, I breathe free breath. I have
    seen the day of wrong through the little hole of
    discretion, and I will right myself like a soldier.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt Worthies]

75 V, 2, 2823
  • [Re-enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO]
  • [Re-enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO]
  • Biron. That's too long for a play.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter DON ADRIANO DE ARMADO]

76 V, 2, 2878
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Don Adriano de Armado. The words of Mercury are harsh after the songs of
    Apollo. You that way: we this way.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

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