Speeches (Lines) for (stage directions) in "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet"

Total: 147
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 15
  • [Enter SAMPSON and GREGORY, of the house of Capulet, armed with swords and buckl...
  • [Enter SAMPSON and GREGORY, of the house of Capulet, armed with swords and bucklers]
  • Chorus. Two households, both alike in dignity,
    In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
    From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
    Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
    From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
    A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
    Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
    Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
    The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
    And the continuance of their parents' rage,
    Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
    Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
    The which if you with patient ears attend,
    What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

    (stage directions). [Enter SAMPSON and GREGORY, of the house of Capulet, armed with swords and bucklers]

2 I, 1, 56
  • [Enter ABRAHAM and BALTHASAR]
  • [Enter ABRAHAM and BALTHASAR]
  • Sampson. Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them;
    which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it.

    (stage directions). [Enter ABRAHAM and BALTHASAR]

3 I, 1, 74
  • [They fight]
  • [They fight]
  • Sampson. Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.

    (stage directions). [They fight]

4 I, 1, 75
  • [Enter BENVOLIO]
  • [Enter BENVOLIO]
  • (stage directions). [They fight]

    (stage directions). [Enter BENVOLIO]

5 I, 1, 78
  • [Beats down their swords]
  • [Beats down their swords]
  • Benvolio. Part, fools!
    Put up your swords; you know not what you do.

    (stage directions). [Beats down their swords]

6 I, 1, 79
  • [Enter TYBALT]
  • [Enter TYBALT]
  • (stage directions). [Beats down their swords]

    (stage directions). [Enter TYBALT]

7 I, 1, 92
  • [Enter CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET]
  • [Enter CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET]
  • First Citizen. Clubs, bills, and partisans! strike! beat them down!
    Down with the Capulets! down with the Montagues!

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET]

8 I, 1, 97
  • [Enter MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE]
  • [Enter MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE]
  • Capulet. My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,
    And flourishes his blade in spite of me.

    (stage directions). [Enter MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE]

9 I, 1, 100
  • [Enter PRINCE, with Attendants]
  • [Enter PRINCE, with Attendants]
  • Lady Montague. Thou shalt not stir a foot to seek a foe.

    (stage directions). [Enter PRINCE, with Attendants]

10 I, 1, 124
  • [Exeunt all but MONTAGUE, LADY MONTAGUE, and BENVOLIO]
  • [Exeunt all but MONTAGUE, LADY MONTAGUE, and BENVOLIO]
  • Prince Escalus. Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
    Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,--
    Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
    That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
    With purple fountains issuing from your veins,
    On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
    Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
    And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
    Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,
    By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,
    Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,
    And made Verona's ancient citizens
    Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,
    To wield old partisans, in hands as old,
    Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:
    If ever you disturb our streets again,
    Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
    For this time, all the rest depart away:
    You Capulet; shall go along with me:
    And, Montague, come you this afternoon,
    To know our further pleasure in this case,
    To old Free-town, our common judgment-place.
    Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt all but MONTAGUE, LADY MONTAGUE, and BENVOLIO]

11 I, 1, 176
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • Montague. Both by myself and many other friends:
    But he, his own affections' counsellor,
    Is to himself--I will not say how true--
    But to himself so secret and so close,
    So far from sounding and discovery,
    As is the bud bit with an envious worm,
    Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air,
    Or dedicate his beauty to the sun.
    Could we but learn from whence his sorrows grow.
    We would as willingly give cure as know.

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

12 I, 1, 181
  • [Exeunt MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE]
  • [Exeunt MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE]
  • Montague. I would thou wert so happy by thy stay,
    To hear true shrift. Come, madam, let's away.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE]

13 I, 1, 269
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Benvolio. I'll pay that doctrine, or else die in debt.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

14 I, 2, 270
  • [Enter CAPULET, PARIS, and Servant]
  • [Enter CAPULET, PARIS, and Servant]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, PARIS, and Servant]

15 I, 2, 310
  • [Exeunt CAPULET and PARIS]
  • [Exeunt CAPULET and PARIS]
  • Capulet. And too soon marr'd are those so early made.
    The earth hath swallow'd all my hopes but she,
    She is the hopeful lady of my earth:
    But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart,
    My will to her consent is but a part;
    An she agree, within her scope of choice
    Lies my consent and fair according voice.
    This night I hold an old accustom'd feast,
    Whereto I have invited many a guest,
    Such as I love; and you, among the store,
    One more, most welcome, makes my number more.
    At my poor house look to behold this night
    Earth-treading stars that make dark heaven light:
    Such comfort as do lusty young men feel
    When well-apparell'd April on the heel
    Of limping winter treads, even such delight
    Among fresh female buds shall you this night
    Inherit at my house; hear all, all see,
    And like her most whose merit most shall be:
    Which on more view, of many mine being one
    May stand in number, though in reckoning none,
    Come, go with me.
    [To Servant, giving a paper]
    Go, sirrah, trudge about
    Through fair Verona; find those persons out
    Whose names are written there, and to them say,
    My house and welcome on their pleasure stay.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt CAPULET and PARIS]

16 I, 2, 318
  • [Enter BENVOLIO and ROMEO]
  • [Enter BENVOLIO and ROMEO]
  • Servant. Find them out whose names are written here! It is
    written, that the shoemaker should meddle with his
    yard, and the tailor with his last, the fisher with
    his pencil, and the painter with his nets; but I am
    sent to find those persons whose names are here
    writ, and can never find what names the writing
    person hath here writ. I must to the learned.--In good time.

    (stage directions). [Enter BENVOLIO and ROMEO]

17 I, 2, 358
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Servant. Now I'll tell you without asking: my master is the
    great rich Capulet; and if you be not of the house
    of Montagues, I pray, come and crush a cup of wine.
    Rest you merry!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

18 I, 2, 379
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Romeo. I'll go along, no such sight to be shown,
    But to rejoice in splendor of mine own.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

19 I, 3, 380
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET and Nurse]
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET and Nurse]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter LADY CAPULET and Nurse]

20 I, 3, 385
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • Nurse. Now, by my maidenhead, at twelve year old,
    I bade her come. What, lamb! what, ladybird!
    God forbid! Where's this girl? What, Juliet!

    (stage directions). [Enter JULIET]

21 I, 3, 485
  • [Enter a Servant]
  • [Enter a Servant]
  • Juliet. I'll look to like, if looking liking move:
    But no more deep will I endart mine eye
    Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.

    (stage directions). [Enter a Servant]

22 I, 3, 494
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Nurse. Go, girl, seek happy nights to happy days.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

23 I, 4, 495
  • [Enter ROMEO, MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, with five or six
    Maskers, Torch-bearers, a...
  • [Enter ROMEO, MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, with five or six
    Maskers, Torch-bearers, and others]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO, MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, with five or six
    Maskers, Torch-bearers, and others]

24 I, 4, 617
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Benvolio. Strike, drum.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

25 I, 5, 618
  • [Musicians waiting. Enter Servingmen with napkins]
  • [Musicians waiting. Enter Servingmen with napkins]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Musicians waiting. Enter Servingmen with napkins]

26 I, 5, 633
  • [Enter CAPULET, with JULIET and others of his house, meeting the Guests and Mask...
  • [Enter CAPULET, with JULIET and others of his house, meeting the Guests and Maskers]
  • Second Servant. We cannot be here and there too. Cheerly, boys; be
    brisk awhile, and the longer liver take all.

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, with JULIET and others of his house, meeting the Guests and Maskers]

27 I, 5, 718
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Tybalt. Patience perforce with wilful choler meeting
    Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting.
    I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall
    Now seeming sweet convert to bitter gall.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

28 I, 5, 757
  • [Exeunt all but JULIET and Nurse]
  • [Exeunt all but JULIET and Nurse]
  • Capulet. Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone;
    We have a trifling foolish banquet towards.
    Is it e'en so? why, then, I thank you all
    I thank you, honest gentlemen; good night.
    More torches here! Come on then, let's to bed.
    Ah, sirrah, by my fay, it waxes late:
    I'll to my rest.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt all but JULIET and Nurse]

29 I, 5, 775
  • [One calls within 'Juliet.']
  • [One calls within 'Juliet.']
  • Juliet. A rhyme I learn'd even now
    Of one I danced withal.

    (stage directions). [One calls within 'Juliet.']

30 I, 5, 778
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Nurse. Anon, anon!
    Come, let's away; the strangers all are gone.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

31 II, 0, 779
  • [Enter Chorus]
  • [Enter Chorus]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter Chorus]

32 II, 0, 794
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Chorus. Now old desire doth in his death-bed lie,
    And young affection gapes to be his heir;
    That fair for which love groan'd for and would die,
    With tender Juliet match'd, is now not fair.
    Now Romeo is beloved and loves again,
    Alike betwitched by the charm of looks,
    But to his foe supposed he must complain,
    And she steal love's sweet bait from fearful hooks:
    Being held a foe, he may not have access
    To breathe such vows as lovers use to swear;
    And she as much in love, her means much less
    To meet her new-beloved any where:
    But passion lends them power, time means, to meet
    Tempering extremities with extreme sweet.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

33 II, 1, 795
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

34 II, 1, 798
  • [He climbs the wall, and leaps down within it]
  • [He climbs the wall, and leaps down within it]
  • Romeo. Can I go forward when my heart is here?
    Turn back, dull earth, and find thy centre out.

    (stage directions). [He climbs the wall, and leaps down within it]

35 II, 1, 799
  • [Enter BENVOLIO and MERCUTIO]
  • [Enter BENVOLIO and MERCUTIO]
  • (stage directions). [He climbs the wall, and leaps down within it]

    (stage directions). [Enter BENVOLIO and MERCUTIO]

36 II, 1, 843
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Benvolio. Go, then; for 'tis in vain
    To seek him here that means not to be found.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

37 II, 2, 844
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

38 II, 2, 991
  • [Exit, above]
  • [Exit, above]
  • Juliet. But to be frank, and give it thee again.
    And yet I wish but for the thing I have:
    My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
    My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
    The more I have, for both are infinite.
    [Nurse calls within]
    I hear some noise within; dear love, adieu!
    Anon, good nurse! Sweet Montague, be true.
    Stay but a little, I will come again.

    (stage directions). [Exit, above]

39 II, 2, 995
  • [Re-enter JULIET, above]
  • [Re-enter JULIET, above]
  • Romeo. O blessed, blessed night! I am afeard.
    Being in night, all this is but a dream,
    Too flattering-sweet to be substantial.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter JULIET, above]

40 II, 2, 1012
  • [Exit, above]
  • [Exit, above]
  • Juliet. A thousand times good night!

    (stage directions). [Exit, above]

41 II, 2, 1017
  • [Retiring]
  • [Retiring]
  • Romeo. A thousand times the worse, to want thy light.
    Love goes toward love, as schoolboys from
    their books,
    But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.

    (stage directions). [Retiring]

42 II, 2, 1018
  • [Re-enter JULIET, above]
  • [Re-enter JULIET, above]
  • (stage directions). [Retiring]

    (stage directions). [Re-enter JULIET, above]

43 II, 2, 1052
  • [Exit above]
  • [Exit above]
  • Juliet. Sweet, so would I:
    Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.
    Good night, good night! parting is such
    sweet sorrow,
    That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

    (stage directions). [Exit above]

44 II, 2, 1057
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Romeo. Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast!
    Would I were sleep and peace, so sweet to rest!
    Hence will I to my ghostly father's cell,
    His help to crave, and my dear hap to tell.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

45 II, 3, 1058
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE, with a basket]
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE, with a basket]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE, with a basket]

46 II, 3, 1089
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • Friar Laurence. The grey-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,
    Chequering the eastern clouds with streaks of light,
    And flecked darkness like a drunkard reels
    From forth day's path and Titan's fiery wheels:
    Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye,
    The day to cheer and night's dank dew to dry,
    I must up-fill this osier cage of ours
    With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.
    The earth that's nature's mother is her tomb;
    What is her burying grave that is her womb,
    And from her womb children of divers kind
    We sucking on her natural bosom find,
    Many for many virtues excellent,
    None but for some and yet all different.
    O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies
    In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities:
    For nought so vile that on the earth doth live
    But to the earth some special good doth give,
    Nor aught so good but strain'd from that fair use
    Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse:
    Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied;
    And vice sometimes by action dignified.
    Within the infant rind of this small flower
    Poison hath residence and medicine power:
    For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part;
    Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart.
    Two such opposed kings encamp them still
    In man as well as herbs, grace and rude will;
    And where the worser is predominant,
    Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

47 II, 3, 1157
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Friar Laurence. Wisely and slow; they stumble that run fast.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

48 II, 4, 1158
  • [Enter BENVOLIO and MERCUTIO]
  • [Enter BENVOLIO and MERCUTIO]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter BENVOLIO and MERCUTIO]

49 II, 4, 1196
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • Mercutio. The pox of such antic, lisping, affecting
    fantasticoes; these new tuners of accents! 'By Jesu,
    a very good blade! a very tall man! a very good
    whore!' Why, is not this a lamentable thing,
    grandsire, that we should be thus afflicted with
    these strange flies, these fashion-mongers, these
    perdona-mi's, who stand so much on the new form,
    that they cannot at ease on the old bench? O, their
    bones, their bones!

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

50 II, 4, 1255
  • [Enter Nurse and PETER]
  • [Enter Nurse and PETER]
  • Romeo. Here's goodly gear!

    (stage directions). [Enter Nurse and PETER]

51 II, 4, 1300
  • [Exeunt MERCUTIO and BENVOLIO]
  • [Exeunt MERCUTIO and BENVOLIO]
  • Mercutio. Farewell, ancient lady; farewell,
    [Singing]
    'lady, lady, lady.'

    (stage directions). [Exeunt MERCUTIO and BENVOLIO]

52 II, 4, 1373
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Nurse. Peter, take my fan, and go before and apace.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

53 II, 5, 1374
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter JULIET]

54 II, 5, 1397
  • [Exit PETER]
  • [Exit PETER]
  • Nurse. Peter, stay at the gate.

    (stage directions). [Exit PETER]

55 II, 5, 1457
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Juliet. Hie to high fortune! Honest nurse, farewell.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

56 II, 6, 1458
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and ROMEO]
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and ROMEO]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and ROMEO]

57 II, 6, 1497
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Friar Laurence. Come, come with me, and we will make short work;
    For, by your leaves, you shall not stay alone
    Till holy church incorporate two in one.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

58 III, 1, 1498
  • [Enter MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, Page, and Servants]
  • [Enter MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, Page, and Servants]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, Page, and Servants]

59 III, 1, 1534
  • [Enter TYBALT and others]
  • [Enter TYBALT and others]
  • Mercutio. By my heel, I care not.

    (stage directions). [Enter TYBALT and others]

60 III, 1, 1553
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • Mercutio. Men's eyes were made to look, and let them gaze;
    I will not budge for no man's pleasure, I.

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

61 III, 1, 1583
  • [Drawing]
  • [Drawing]
  • Tybalt. I am for you.

    (stage directions). [Drawing]

62 III, 1, 1586
  • [They fight]
  • [They fight]
  • Mercutio. Come, sir, your passado.

    (stage directions). [They fight]

63 III, 1, 1592
  • [TYBALT under ROMEO's arm stabs MERCUTIO, and flies with his followers]
  • [TYBALT under ROMEO's arm stabs MERCUTIO, and flies with his followers]
  • Romeo. Draw, Benvolio; beat down their weapons.
    Gentlemen, for shame, forbear this outrage!
    Tybalt, Mercutio, the prince expressly hath
    Forbidden bandying in Verona streets:
    Hold, Tybalt! good Mercutio!

    (stage directions). [TYBALT under ROMEO's arm stabs MERCUTIO, and flies with his followers]

64 III, 1, 1599
  • [Exit Page]
  • [Exit Page]
  • Mercutio. Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch; marry, 'tis enough.
    Where is my page? Go, villain, fetch a surgeon.

    (stage directions). [Exit Page]

65 III, 1, 1615
  • [Exeunt MERCUTIO and BENVOLIO]
  • [Exeunt MERCUTIO and BENVOLIO]
  • Mercutio. Help me into some house, Benvolio,
    Or I shall faint. A plague o' both your houses!
    They have made worms' meat of me: I have it,
    And soundly too: your houses!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt MERCUTIO and BENVOLIO]

66 III, 1, 1623
  • [Re-enter BENVOLIO]
  • [Re-enter BENVOLIO]
  • Romeo. This gentleman, the prince's near ally,
    My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt
    In my behalf; my reputation stain'd
    With Tybalt's slander,--Tybalt, that an hour
    Hath been my kinsman! O sweet Juliet,
    Thy beauty hath made me effeminate
    And in my temper soften'd valour's steel!

    (stage directions). [Re-enter BENVOLIO]

67 III, 1, 1642
  • [They fight; TYBALT falls]
  • [They fight; TYBALT falls]
  • Romeo. This shall determine that.

    (stage directions). [They fight; TYBALT falls]

68 III, 1, 1649
  • [Exit ROMEO]
  • [Exit ROMEO]
  • Benvolio. Why dost thou stay?

    (stage directions). [Exit ROMEO]

69 III, 1, 1650
  • [Enter Citizens, &c]
  • [Enter Citizens, &c]
  • (stage directions). [Exit ROMEO]

    (stage directions). [Enter Citizens, &c]

70 III, 1, 1717
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Prince Escalus. And for that offence
    Immediately we do exile him hence:
    I have an interest in your hate's proceeding,
    My blood for your rude brawls doth lie a-bleeding;
    But I'll amerce you with so strong a fine
    That you shall all repent the loss of mine:
    I will be deaf to pleading and excuses;
    Nor tears nor prayers shall purchase out abuses:
    Therefore use none: let Romeo hence in haste,
    Else, when he's found, that hour is his last.
    Bear hence this body and attend our will:
    Mercy but murders, pardoning those that kill.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

71 III, 2, 1718
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter JULIET]

72 III, 2, 1756
  • [Throws them down]
  • [Throws them down]
  • Nurse. Ay, ay, the cords.

    (stage directions). [Throws them down]

73 III, 2, 1868
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Juliet. O, find him! give this ring to my true knight,
    And bid him come to take his last farewell.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

74 III, 3, 1869
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE]
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE]

75 III, 3, 1873
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • Friar Laurence. Romeo, come forth; come forth, thou fearful man:
    Affliction is enamour'd of thy parts,
    And thou art wedded to calamity.

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

76 III, 3, 1942
  • [Knocking within]
  • [Knocking within]
  • Romeo. Thou canst not speak of that thou dost not feel:
    Wert thou as young as I, Juliet thy love,
    An hour but married, Tybalt murdered,
    Doting like me and like me banished,
    Then mightst thou speak, then mightst thou tear thy hair,
    And fall upon the ground, as I do now,
    Taking the measure of an unmade grave.

    (stage directions). [Knocking within]

77 III, 3, 1946
  • [Knocking]
  • [Knocking]
  • Romeo. Not I; unless the breath of heartsick groans,
    Mist-like, infold me from the search of eyes.

    (stage directions). [Knocking]

78 III, 3, 1958
  • [Enter Nurse]
  • [Enter Nurse]
  • Friar Laurence. Welcome, then.

    (stage directions). [Enter Nurse]

79 III, 3, 1988
  • [Drawing his sword]
  • [Drawing his sword]
  • Romeo. As if that name,
    Shot from the deadly level of a gun,
    Did murder her; as that name's cursed hand
    Murder'd her kinsman. O, tell me, friar, tell me,
    In what vile part of this anatomy
    Doth my name lodge? tell me, that I may sack
    The hateful mansion.

    (stage directions). [Drawing his sword]

80 III, 3, 2046
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Nurse. Here, sir, a ring she bid me give you, sir:
    Hie you, make haste, for it grows very late.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

81 III, 3, 2057
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Romeo. But that a joy past joy calls out on me,
    It were a grief, so brief to part with thee: Farewell.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

82 III, 4, 2058
  • [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and PARIS]
  • [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and PARIS]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and PARIS]

83 III, 4, 2096
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Capulet. Well get you gone: o' Thursday be it, then.
    Go you to Juliet ere you go to bed,
    Prepare her, wife, against this wedding-day.
    Farewell, my lord. Light to my chamber, ho!
    Afore me! it is so very very late,
    That we may call it early by and by.
    Good night.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

84 III, 5, 2097
  • [Enter ROMEO and JULIET above, at the window]
  • [Enter ROMEO and JULIET above, at the window]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO and JULIET above, at the window]

85 III, 5, 2134
  • [Enter Nurse, to the chamber]
  • [Enter Nurse, to the chamber]
  • Romeo. More light and light; more dark and dark our woes!

    (stage directions). [Enter Nurse, to the chamber]

86 III, 5, 2139
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Nurse. Your lady mother is coming to your chamber:
    The day is broke; be wary, look about.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

87 III, 5, 2142
  • [He goeth down]
  • [He goeth down]
  • Romeo. Farewell, farewell! one kiss, and I'll descend.

    (stage directions). [He goeth down]

88 III, 5, 2160
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Romeo. And trust me, love, in my eye so do you:
    Dry sorrow drinks our blood. Adieu, adieu!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

89 III, 5, 2170
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET]
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET]
  • Juliet. Who is't that calls? is it my lady mother?
    Is she not down so late, or up so early?
    What unaccustom'd cause procures her hither?

    (stage directions). [Enter LADY CAPULET]

90 III, 5, 2232
  • [Enter CAPULET and Nurse]
  • [Enter CAPULET and Nurse]
  • Lady Capulet. Here comes your father; tell him so yourself,
    And see how he will take it at your hands.

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET and Nurse]

91 III, 5, 2310
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Capulet. God's bread! it makes me mad:
    Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play,
    Alone, in company, still my care hath been
    To have her match'd: and having now provided
    A gentleman of noble parentage,
    Of fair demesnes, youthful, and nobly train'd,
    Stuff'd, as they say, with honourable parts,
    Proportion'd as one's thought would wish a man;
    And then to have a wretched puling fool,
    A whining mammet, in her fortune's tender,
    To answer 'I'll not wed; I cannot love,
    I am too young; I pray you, pardon me.'
    But, as you will not wed, I'll pardon you:
    Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
    Look to't, think on't, I do not use to jest.
    Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise:
    An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend;
    And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in
    the streets,
    For, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee,
    Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:
    Trust to't, bethink you; I'll not be forsworn.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

92 III, 5, 2319
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Lady Capulet. Talk not to me, for I'll not speak a word:
    Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

93 III, 5, 2353
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Nurse. Marry, I will; and this is wisely done.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

94 III, 5, 2362
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Juliet. Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!
    Is it more sin to wish me thus forsworn,
    Or to dispraise my lord with that same tongue
    Which she hath praised him with above compare
    So many thousand times? Go, counsellor;
    Thou and my bosom henceforth shall be twain.
    I'll to the friar, to know his remedy:
    If all else fail, myself have power to die.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

95 IV, 1, 2363
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS]
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS]

96 IV, 1, 2381
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • Friar Laurence. [Aside] I would I knew not why it should be slow'd.
    Look, sir, here comes the lady towards my cell.

    (stage directions). [Enter JULIET]

97 IV, 1, 2409
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Paris. God shield I should disturb devotion!
    Juliet, on Thursday early will I rouse ye:
    Till then, adieu; and keep this holy kiss.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

98 IV, 1, 2493
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Juliet. Love give me strength! and strength shall help afford.
    Farewell, dear father!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

99 IV, 2, 2494
  • [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, Nurse, and two Servingmen]
  • [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, Nurse, and two Servingmen]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, Nurse, and two Servingmen]

100 IV, 2, 2512
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • [Enter JULIET]
  • Nurse. See where she comes from shrift with merry look.

    (stage directions). [Enter JULIET]

101 IV, 2, 2535
  • [Exeunt JULIET and Nurse]
  • [Exeunt JULIET and Nurse]
  • Capulet. Go, nurse, go with her: we'll to church to-morrow.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt JULIET and Nurse]

102 IV, 2, 2547
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Capulet. Tush, I will stir about,
    And all things shall be well, I warrant thee, wife:
    Go thou to Juliet, help to deck up her;
    I'll not to bed to-night; let me alone;
    I'll play the housewife for this once. What, ho!
    They are all forth. Well, I will walk myself
    To County Paris, to prepare him up
    Against to-morrow: my heart is wondrous light,
    Since this same wayward girl is so reclaim'd.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

103 IV, 3, 2548
  • [Enter JULIET and Nurse]
  • [Enter JULIET and Nurse]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter JULIET and Nurse]

104 IV, 3, 2554
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET]
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET]
  • Juliet. Ay, those attires are best: but, gentle nurse,
    I pray thee, leave me to myself to-night,
    For I have need of many orisons
    To move the heavens to smile upon my state,
    Which, well thou know'st, is cross, and full of sin.

    (stage directions). [Enter LADY CAPULET]

105 IV, 3, 2564
  • [Exeunt LADY CAPULET and Nurse]
  • [Exeunt LADY CAPULET and Nurse]
  • Lady Capulet. Good night:
    Get thee to bed, and rest; for thou hast need.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt LADY CAPULET and Nurse]

106 IV, 3, 2611
  • [She falls upon her bed, within the curtains]
  • [She falls upon her bed, within the curtains]
  • Juliet. Farewell! God knows when we shall meet again.
    I have a faint cold fear thrills through my veins,
    That almost freezes up the heat of life:
    I'll call them back again to comfort me:
    Nurse! What should she do here?
    My dismal scene I needs must act alone.
    Come, vial.
    What if this mixture do not work at all?
    Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
    No, no: this shall forbid it: lie thou there.
    [Laying down her dagger]
    What if it be a poison, which the friar
    Subtly hath minister'd to have me dead,
    Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour'd,
    Because he married me before to Romeo?
    I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
    For he hath still been tried a holy man.
    How if, when I am laid into the tomb,
    I wake before the time that Romeo
    Come to redeem me? there's a fearful point!
    Shall I not, then, be stifled in the vault,
    To whose foul mouth no healthsome air breathes in,
    And there die strangled ere my Romeo comes?
    Or, if I live, is it not very like,
    The horrible conceit of death and night,
    Together with the terror of the place,--
    As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
    Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
    Of all my buried ancestors are packed:
    Where bloody Tybalt, yet but green in earth,
    Lies festering in his shroud; where, as they say,
    At some hours in the night spirits resort;--
    Alack, alack, is it not like that I,
    So early waking, what with loathsome smells,
    And shrieks like mandrakes' torn out of the earth,
    That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:--
    O, if I wake, shall I not be distraught,
    Environed with all these hideous fears?
    And madly play with my forefather's joints?
    And pluck the mangled Tybalt from his shroud?
    And, in this rage, with some great kinsman's bone,
    As with a club, dash out my desperate brains?
    O, look! methinks I see my cousin's ghost
    Seeking out Romeo, that did spit his body
    Upon a rapier's point: stay, Tybalt, stay!
    Romeo, I come! this do I drink to thee.

    (stage directions). [She falls upon her bed, within the curtains]

107 IV, 4, 2612
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET and Nurse]
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET and Nurse]
  • (stage directions). [She falls upon her bed, within the curtains]

    (stage directions). [Enter LADY CAPULET and Nurse]

108 IV, 4, 2615
  • [Enter CAPULET]
  • [Enter CAPULET]
  • Nurse. They call for dates and quinces in the pastry.

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET]

109 IV, 4, 2627
  • [Exeunt LADY CAPULET and Nurse]
  • [Exeunt LADY CAPULET and Nurse]
  • Lady Capulet. Ay, you have been a mouse-hunt in your time;
    But I will watch you from such watching now.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt LADY CAPULET and Nurse]

110 IV, 4, 2629
  • [Enter three or four Servingmen, with spits, logs, and baskets]
  • [Enter three or four Servingmen, with spits, logs, and baskets]
  • Capulet. A jealous hood, a jealous hood!

    (stage directions). [Enter three or four Servingmen, with spits, logs, and baskets]

111 IV, 4, 2639
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Second Servant. I have a head, sir, that will find out logs,
    And never trouble Peter for the matter.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

112 IV, 4, 2651
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Capulet. Mass, and well said; a merry whoreson, ha!
    Thou shalt be logger-head. Good faith, 'tis day:
    The county will be here with music straight,
    For so he said he would: I hear him near.
    [Music within]
    Nurse! Wife! What, ho! What, nurse, I say!
    [Re-enter Nurse]
    Go waken Juliet, go and trim her up;
    I'll go and chat with Paris: hie, make haste,
    Make haste; the bridegroom he is come already:
    Make haste, I say.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

113 IV, 5, 2652
  • [Enter Nurse]
  • [Enter Nurse]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter Nurse]

114 IV, 5, 2670
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET]
  • [Enter LADY CAPULET]
  • Nurse. Mistress! what, mistress! Juliet! fast, I warrant her, she:
    Why, lamb! why, lady! fie, you slug-a-bed!
    Why, love, I say! madam! sweet-heart! why, bride!
    What, not a word? you take your pennyworths now;
    Sleep for a week; for the next night, I warrant,
    The County Paris hath set up his rest,
    That you shall rest but little. God forgive me,
    Marry, and amen, how sound is she asleep!
    I must needs wake her. Madam, madam, madam!
    Ay, let the county take you in your bed;
    He'll fright you up, i' faith. Will it not be?
    [Undraws the curtains]
    What, dress'd! and in your clothes! and down again!
    I must needs wake you; Lady! lady! lady!
    Alas, alas! Help, help! my lady's dead!
    O, well-a-day, that ever I was born!
    Some aqua vitae, ho! My lord! my lady!

    (stage directions). [Enter LADY CAPULET]

115 IV, 5, 2678
  • [Enter CAPULET]
  • [Enter CAPULET]
  • Lady Capulet. O me, O me! My child, my only life,
    Revive, look up, or I will die with thee!
    Help, help! Call help.

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET]

116 IV, 5, 2691
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS, with Musicians]
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS, with Musicians]
  • Capulet. Death, that hath ta'en her hence to make me wail,
    Ties up my tongue, and will not let me speak.

    (stage directions). [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE and PARIS, with Musicians]

117 IV, 5, 2755
  • [Exeunt CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, PARIS, and FRIAR LAURENCE]
  • [Exeunt CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, PARIS, and FRIAR LAURENCE]
  • Friar Laurence. Sir, go you in; and, madam, go with him;
    And go, Sir Paris; every one prepare
    To follow this fair corse unto her grave:
    The heavens do lour upon you for some ill;
    Move them no more by crossing their high will.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, PARIS, and FRIAR LAURENCE]

118 IV, 5, 2759
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Nurse. Honest goodfellows, ah, put up, put up;
    For, well you know, this is a pitiful case.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

119 IV, 5, 2761
  • [Enter PETER]
  • [Enter PETER]
  • First Musician. Ay, by my troth, the case may be amended.

    (stage directions). [Enter PETER]

120 IV, 5, 2799
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Peter. O, I cry you mercy; you are the singer: I will say
    for you. It is 'music with her silver sound,'
    because musicians have no gold for sounding:
    'Then music with her silver sound
    With speedy help doth lend redress.'

    (stage directions). [Exit]

121 IV, 5, 2803
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Second Musician. Hang him, Jack! Come, we'll in here; tarry for the
    mourners, and stay dinner.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

122 V, 1, 2804
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • [Enter ROMEO]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO]

123 V, 1, 2867
  • [Enter Apothecary]
  • [Enter Apothecary]
  • Romeo. No matter: get thee gone,
    And hire those horses; I'll be with thee straight.
    [Exit BALTHASAR]
    Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee to-night.
    Let's see for means: O mischief, thou art swift
    To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!
    I do remember an apothecary,--
    And hereabouts he dwells,--which late I noted
    In tatter'd weeds, with overwhelming brows,
    Culling of simples; meagre were his looks,
    Sharp misery had worn him to the bones:
    And in his needy shop a tortoise hung,
    An alligator stuff'd, and other skins
    Of ill-shaped fishes; and about his shelves
    A beggarly account of empty boxes,
    Green earthen pots, bladders and musty seeds,
    Remnants of packthread and old cakes of roses,
    Were thinly scatter'd, to make up a show.
    Noting this penury, to myself I said
    'An if a man did need a poison now,
    Whose sale is present death in Mantua,
    Here lives a caitiff wretch would sell it him.'
    O, this same thought did but forerun my need;
    And this same needy man must sell it me.
    As I remember, this should be the house.
    Being holiday, the beggar's shop is shut.
    What, ho! apothecary!

    (stage directions). [Enter Apothecary]

124 V, 1, 2898
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Romeo. There is thy gold, worse poison to men's souls,
    Doing more murders in this loathsome world,
    Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell.
    I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none.
    Farewell: buy food, and get thyself in flesh.
    Come, cordial and not poison, go with me
    To Juliet's grave; for there must I use thee.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

125 V, 2, 2899
  • [Enter FRIAR JOHN]
  • [Enter FRIAR JOHN]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter FRIAR JOHN]

126 V, 2, 2901
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE]
  • [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE]
  • Friar John. Holy Franciscan friar! brother, ho!

    (stage directions). [Enter FRIAR LAURENCE]

127 V, 2, 2924
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Friar John. Brother, I'll go and bring it thee.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

128 V, 2, 2932
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Friar Laurence. Now must I to the monument alone;
    Within three hours will fair Juliet wake:
    She will beshrew me much that Romeo
    Hath had no notice of these accidents;
    But I will write again to Mantua,
    And keep her at my cell till Romeo come;
    Poor living corse, closed in a dead man's tomb!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

129 V, 3, 2933
  • [Enter PARIS, and his Page bearing flowers and a torch]
  • [Enter PARIS, and his Page bearing flowers and a torch]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter PARIS, and his Page bearing flowers and a torch]

130 V, 3, 2945
  • [Retires]
  • [Retires]
  • Page. [Aside] I am almost afraid to stand alone
    Here in the churchyard; yet I will adventure.

    (stage directions). [Retires]

131 V, 3, 2957
  • [Retires]
  • [Retires]
  • Paris. Sweet flower, with flowers thy bridal bed I strew,--
    O woe! thy canopy is dust and stones;--
    Which with sweet water nightly I will dew,
    Or, wanting that, with tears distill'd by moans:
    The obsequies that I for thee will keep
    Nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep.
    [The Page whistles]
    The boy gives warning something doth approach.
    What cursed foot wanders this way to-night,
    To cross my obsequies and true love's rite?
    What with a torch! muffle me, night, awhile.

    (stage directions). [Retires]

132 V, 3, 2958
  • [Enter ROMEO and BALTHASAR, with a torch, mattock, &c]
  • [Enter ROMEO and BALTHASAR, with a torch, mattock, &c]
  • (stage directions). [Retires]

    (stage directions). [Enter ROMEO and BALTHASAR, with a torch, mattock, &c]

133 V, 3, 2982
  • [Retires]
  • [Retires]
  • Balthasar. [Aside] For all this same, I'll hide me hereabout:
    His looks I fear, and his intents I doubt.

    (stage directions). [Retires]

134 V, 3, 2987
  • [Opens the tomb]
  • [Opens the tomb]
  • Romeo. Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death,
    Gorged with the dearest morsel of the earth,
    Thus I enforce thy rotten jaws to open,
    And, in despite, I'll cram thee with more food!

    (stage directions). [Opens the tomb]

135 V, 3, 3011
  • [They fight]
  • [They fight]
  • Romeo. Wilt thou provoke me? then have at thee, boy!

    (stage directions). [They fight]

136 V, 3, 3013
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Page. O Lord, they fight! I will go call the watch.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

137 V, 3, 3018
  • [Dies]
  • [Dies]
  • Paris. O, I am slain!
    [Falls]
    If thou be merciful,
    Open the tomb, lay me with Juliet.

    (stage directions). [Dies]

138 V, 3, 3106
  • [JULIET wakes]
  • [JULIET wakes]
  • Friar Laurence. Romeo!
    [Advances]
    Alack, alack, what blood is this, which stains
    The stony entrance of this sepulchre?
    What mean these masterless and gory swords
    To lie discolour'd by this place of peace?
    [Enters the tomb]
    Romeo! O, pale! Who else? what, Paris too?
    And steep'd in blood? Ah, what an unkind hour
    Is guilty of this lamentable chance!
    The lady stirs.

    (stage directions). [JULIET wakes]

139 V, 3, 3110
  • [Noise within]
  • [Noise within]
  • Juliet. O comfortable friar! where is my lord?
    I do remember well where I should be,
    And there I am. Where is my Romeo?

    (stage directions). [Noise within]

140 V, 3, 3138
  • [Falls on ROMEO's body, and dies]
  • [Falls on ROMEO's body, and dies]
  • Juliet. Yea, noise? then I'll be brief. O happy dagger!
    [Snatching ROMEO's dagger]
    This is thy sheath;
    [Stabs herself]
    there rust, and let me die.

    (stage directions). [Falls on ROMEO's body, and dies]

141 V, 3, 3139
  • [Enter Watch, with the Page of PARIS]
  • [Enter Watch, with the Page of PARIS]
  • (stage directions). [Falls on ROMEO's body, and dies]

    (stage directions). [Enter Watch, with the Page of PARIS]

142 V, 3, 3151
  • [Re-enter some of the Watch, with BALTHASAR]
  • [Re-enter some of the Watch, with BALTHASAR]
  • First Watchman. The ground is bloody; search about the churchyard:
    Go, some of you, whoe'er you find attach.
    Pitiful sight! here lies the county slain,
    And Juliet bleeding, warm, and newly dead,
    Who here hath lain these two days buried.
    Go, tell the prince: run to the Capulets:
    Raise up the Montagues: some others search:
    We see the ground whereon these woes do lie;
    But the true ground of all these piteous woes
    We cannot without circumstance descry.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter some of the Watch, with BALTHASAR]

143 V, 3, 3154
  • [Re-enter others of the Watch, with FRIAR LAURENCE]
  • [Re-enter others of the Watch, with FRIAR LAURENCE]
  • First Watchman. Hold him in safety, till the prince come hither.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter others of the Watch, with FRIAR LAURENCE]

144 V, 3, 3159
  • [Enter the PRINCE and Attendants]
  • [Enter the PRINCE and Attendants]
  • First Watchman. A great suspicion: stay the friar too.

    (stage directions). [Enter the PRINCE and Attendants]

145 V, 3, 3162
  • [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and others]
  • [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and others]
  • Prince Escalus. What misadventure is so early up,
    That calls our person from our morning's rest?

    (stage directions). [Enter CAPULET, LADY CAPULET, and others]

146 V, 3, 3181
  • [Enter MONTAGUE and others]
  • [Enter MONTAGUE and others]
  • Lady Capulet. O me! this sight of death is as a bell,
    That warns my old age to a sepulchre.

    (stage directions). [Enter MONTAGUE and others]

147 V, 3, 3287
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Prince Escalus. A glooming peace this morning with it brings;
    The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:
    Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things;
    Some shall be pardon'd, and some punished:
    For never was a story of more woe
    Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

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