Speeches (Lines) for (stage directions) in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 164
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# Act, Scene, Line Speech text
1 I, 1, 32
  • [Enter TROILUS armed, and PANDARUS]
  • [Enter TROILUS armed, and PANDARUS]
  • Chorus. In Troy, there lies the scene. From isles of Greece
    The princes orgulous, their high blood chafed,
    Have to the port of Athens sent their ships,
    Fraught with the ministers and instruments
    Of cruel war: sixty and nine, that wore
    Their crownets regal, from the Athenian bay
    Put forth toward Phrygia; and their vow is made
    To ransack Troy, within whose strong immures
    The ravish'd Helen, Menelaus' queen,
    With wanton Paris sleeps; and that's the quarrel.
    To Tenedos they come;
    And the deep-drawing barks do there disgorge
    Their warlike fraughtage: now on Dardan plains
    The fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch
    Their brave pavilions: Priam's six-gated city,
    Dardan, and Tymbria, Helias, Chetas, Troien,
    And Antenorides, with massy staples
    And corresponsive and fulfilling bolts,
    Sperr up the sons of Troy.
    Now expectation, tickling skittish spirits,
    On one and other side, Trojan and Greek,
    Sets all on hazard: and hither am I come
    A prologue arm'd, but not in confidence
    Of author's pen or actor's voice, but suited
    In like conditions as our argument,
    To tell you, fair beholders, that our play
    Leaps o'er the vaunt and firstlings of those broils,
    Beginning in the middle, starting thence away
    To what may be digested in a play.
    Like or find fault; do as your pleasures are:
    Now good or bad, 'tis but the chance of war.

    (stage directions). [Enter TROILUS armed, and PANDARUS]

2 I, 1, 118
  • [Exit PANDARUS. An alarum]
  • [Exit PANDARUS. An alarum]
  • Pandarus. Pray you, speak no more to me: I will leave all as I
    found it, and there an end.

    (stage directions). [Exit PANDARUS. An alarum]

3 I, 1, 135
  • [Alarum. Enter AENEAS]
  • [Alarum. Enter AENEAS]
  • Troilus. Peace, you ungracious clamours! peace, rude sounds!
    Fools on both sides! Helen must needs be fair,
    When with your blood you daily paint her thus.
    I cannot fight upon this argument;
    It is too starved a subject for my sword.
    But Pandarus,--O gods, how do you plague me!
    I cannot come to Cressid but by Pandar;
    And he's as tetchy to be woo'd to woo.
    As she is stubborn-chaste against all suit.
    Tell me, Apollo, for thy Daphne's love,
    What Cressid is, what Pandar, and what we?
    Her bed is India; there she lies, a pearl:
    Between our Ilium and where she resides,
    Let it be call'd the wild and wandering flood,
    Ourself the merchant, and this sailing Pandar
    Our doubtful hope, our convoy and our bark.

    (stage directions). [Alarum. Enter AENEAS]

4 I, 1, 145
  • [Alarum]
  • [Alarum]
  • Troilus. Let Paris bleed; 'tis but a scar to scorn;
    Paris is gored with Menelaus' horn.

    (stage directions). [Alarum]

5 I, 1, 151
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Troilus. Come, go we then together.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

6 I, 2, 152
  • [Enter CRESSIDA and ALEXANDER]
  • [Enter CRESSIDA and ALEXANDER]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter CRESSIDA and ALEXANDER]

7 I, 2, 193
  • [Enter PANDARUS]
  • [Enter PANDARUS]
  • Alexander. Madam, your uncle Pandarus.

    (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS]

8 I, 2, 322
  • [A retreat sounded]
  • [A retreat sounded]
  • Cressida. And I'll spring up in his tears, an 'twere a nettle
    against May.

    (stage directions). [A retreat sounded]

9 I, 2, 331
  • [AENEAS passes]
  • [AENEAS passes]
  • Cressida. Speak not so loud.

    (stage directions). [AENEAS passes]

10 I, 2, 335
  • [ANTENOR passes]
  • [ANTENOR passes]
  • Pandarus. That's AEneas: is not that a brave man? he's one of
    the flowers of Troy, I can tell you: but mark
    Troilus; you shall see anon.

    (stage directions). [ANTENOR passes]

11 I, 2, 345
  • [HECTOR passes]
  • [HECTOR passes]
  • Cressida. If he do, the rich shall have more.

    (stage directions). [HECTOR passes]

12 I, 2, 366
  • [HELENUS passes]
  • [HELENUS passes]
  • Pandarus. Swords! any thing, he cares not; an the devil come
    to him, it's all one: by God's lid, it does one's
    heart good. Yonder comes Paris, yonder comes Paris.
    [PARIS passes]
    Look ye yonder, niece; is't not a gallant man too,
    is't not? Why, this is brave now. Who said he came
    hurt home to-day? he's not hurt: why, this will do
    Helen's heart good now, ha! Would I could see
    Troilus now! You shall see Troilus anon.

    (stage directions). [HELENUS passes]

13 I, 2, 375
  • [TROILUS passes]
  • [TROILUS passes]
  • Cressida. What sneaking fellow comes yonder?

    (stage directions). [TROILUS passes]

14 I, 2, 390
  • [Forces pass]
  • [Forces pass]
  • Cressida. Here come more.

    (stage directions). [Forces pass]

15 I, 2, 421
  • [Enter Troilus's Boy]
  • [Enter Troilus's Boy]
  • Pandarus. You are such another!

    (stage directions). [Enter Troilus's Boy]

16 I, 2, 448
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Cressida. By the same token, you are a bawd.
    [Exit PANDARUS]
    Words, vows, gifts, tears, and love's full sacrifice,
    He offers in another's enterprise;
    But more in Troilus thousand fold I see
    Than in the glass of Pandar's praise may be;
    Yet hold I off. Women are angels, wooing:
    Things won are done; joy's soul lies in the doing.
    That she beloved knows nought that knows not this:
    Men prize the thing ungain'd more than it is:
    That she was never yet that ever knew
    Love got so sweet as when desire did sue.
    Therefore this maxim out of love I teach:
    Achievement is command; ungain'd, beseech:
    Then though my heart's content firm love doth bear,
    Nothing of that shall from mine eyes appear.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

17 I, 3, 449
  • [Sennet. Enter AGAMEMNON, NESTOR, ULYSSES,]
    MENELAUS, and others]
  • [Sennet. Enter AGAMEMNON, NESTOR, ULYSSES,]
    MENELAUS, and others]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Sennet. Enter AGAMEMNON, NESTOR, ULYSSES,]
    MENELAUS, and others]

18 I, 3, 666
  • [A tucket]
  • [A tucket]
  • Nestor. Let this be granted, and Achilles' horse
    Makes many Thetis' sons.

    (stage directions). [A tucket]

19 I, 3, 669
  • [Enter AENEAS]
  • [Enter AENEAS]
  • Menelaus. From Troy.

    (stage directions). [Enter AENEAS]

20 I, 3, 771
  • [Exeunt all but ULYSSES and NESTOR]
  • [Exeunt all but ULYSSES and NESTOR]
  • Agamemnon. Fair Lord AEneas, let me touch your hand;
    To our pavilion shall I lead you, sir.
    Achilles shall have word of this intent;
    So shall each lord of Greece, from tent to tent:
    Yourself shall feast with us before you go
    And find the welcome of a noble foe.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt all but ULYSSES and NESTOR]

21 I, 3, 856
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Nestor. Ulysses,
    Now I begin to relish thy advice;
    And I will give a taste of it forthwith
    To Agamemnon: go we to him straight.
    Two curs shall tame each other: pride alone
    Must tarre the mastiffs on, as 'twere their bone.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

22 II, 1, 857
  • [Enter AJAX and THERSITES]
  • [Enter AJAX and THERSITES]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter AJAX and THERSITES]

23 II, 1, 911
  • [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]
  • [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]
  • Thersites. Mars his idiot! do, rudeness; do, camel; do, do.

    (stage directions). [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]

24 II, 1, 935
  • [Ajax offers to beat him]
  • [Ajax offers to beat him]
  • Thersites. I say, this Ajax--

    (stage directions). [Ajax offers to beat him]

25 II, 1, 976
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Thersites. I will see you hanged, like clotpoles, ere I come
    any more to your tents: I will keep where there is
    wit stirring and leave the faction of fools.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

26 II, 1, 988
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Ajax. O, meaning you. I will go learn more of it.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

27 II, 2, 989
  • [Enter PRIAM, HECTOR, TROILUS, PARIS, and HELENUS]
  • [Enter PRIAM, HECTOR, TROILUS, PARIS, and HELENUS]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter PRIAM, HECTOR, TROILUS, PARIS, and HELENUS]

28 II, 2, 1095
  • [Enter CASSANDRA, raving]
  • [Enter CASSANDRA, raving]
  • Hector. It is Cassandra.

    (stage directions). [Enter CASSANDRA, raving]

29 II, 2, 1108
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Cassandra. Virgins and boys, mid-age and wrinkled eld,
    Soft infancy, that nothing canst but cry,
    Add to my clamours! let us pay betimes
    A moiety of that mass of moan to come.
    Cry, Trojans, cry! practise your eyes with tears!
    Troy must not be, nor goodly Ilion stand;
    Our firebrand brother, Paris, burns us all.
    Cry, Trojans, cry! a Helen and a woe:
    Cry, cry! Troy burns, or else let Helen go.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

30 II, 2, 1213
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Hector. I am yours,
    You valiant offspring of great Priamus.
    I have a roisting challenge sent amongst
    The dun and factious nobles of the Greeks
    Will strike amazement to their drowsy spirits:
    I was advertised their great general slept,
    Whilst emulation in the army crept:
    This, I presume, will wake him.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

31 II, 3, 1214
  • [Enter THERSITES, solus]
  • [Enter THERSITES, solus]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter THERSITES, solus]

32 II, 3, 1237
  • [Enter PATROCLUS]
  • [Enter PATROCLUS]
  • Thersites. How now, Thersites! what lost in the labyrinth of
    thy fury! Shall the elephant Ajax carry it thus? He
    beats me, and I rail at him: O, worthy satisfaction!
    would it were otherwise; that I could beat him,
    whilst he railed at me. 'Sfoot, I'll learn to
    conjure and raise devils, but I'll see some issue of
    my spiteful execrations. Then there's Achilles, a
    rare enginer! If Troy be not taken till these two
    undermine it, the walls will stand till they fall of
    themselves. O thou great thunder-darter of Olympus,
    forget that thou art Jove, the king of gods and,
    Mercury, lose all the serpentine craft of thy
    caduceus, if ye take not that little, little less
    than little wit from them that they have! which
    short-armed ignorance itself knows is so abundant
    scarce, it will not in circumvention deliver a fly
    from a spider, without drawing their massy irons and
    cutting the web. After this, the vengeance on the
    whole camp! or rather, the bone-ache! for that,
    methinks, is the curse dependent on those that war
    for a placket. I have said my prayers and devil Envy
    say Amen. What ho! my Lord Achilles!

    (stage directions). [Enter PATROCLUS]

33 II, 3, 1251
  • [Enter ACHILLES]
  • [Enter ACHILLES]
  • Thersites. Ay: the heavens hear me!

    (stage directions). [Enter ACHILLES]

34 II, 3, 1283
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Achilles. Patroclus, I'll speak with nobody.
    Come in with me, Thersites.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

35 II, 3, 1289
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Thersites. Here is such patchery, such juggling and such
    knavery! all the argument is a cuckold and a
    whore; a good quarrel to draw emulous factions
    and bleed to death upon. Now, the dry serpigo on
    the subject! and war and lechery confound all!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

36 II, 3, 1290
  • [Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, NESTOR, DIOMEDES, and AJAX]
  • [Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, NESTOR, DIOMEDES, and AJAX]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, NESTOR, DIOMEDES, and AJAX]

37 II, 3, 1300
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Patroclus. I shall say so to him.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

38 II, 3, 1307
  • [Takes AGAMEMNON aside]
  • [Takes AGAMEMNON aside]
  • Ajax. Yes, lion-sick, sick of proud heart: you may call it
    melancholy, if you will favour the man; but, by my
    head, 'tis pride: but why, why? let him show us the
    cause. A word, my lord.

    (stage directions). [Takes AGAMEMNON aside]

39 II, 3, 1320
  • [Re-enter PATROCLUS]
  • [Re-enter PATROCLUS]
  • Ulysses. The amity that wisdom knits not, folly may easily
    untie. Here comes Patroclus.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter PATROCLUS]

40 II, 3, 1359
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Patroclus. I shall; and bring his answer presently.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

41 II, 3, 1362
  • [Exit ULYSSES]
  • [Exit ULYSSES]
  • Agamemnon. In second voice we'll not be satisfied;
    We come to speak with him. Ulysses, enter you.

    (stage directions). [Exit ULYSSES]

42 II, 3, 1381
  • [Aside]
  • [Aside]
  • Nestor. Yet he loves himself: is't not strange?

    (stage directions). [Aside]

43 II, 3, 1382
  • [Re-enter ULYSSES]
  • [Re-enter ULYSSES]
  • (stage directions). [Aside]

    (stage directions). [Re-enter ULYSSES]

44 II, 3, 1491
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Agamemnon. Go we to council. Let Achilles sleep:
    Light boats sail swift, though greater hulks draw deep.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

45 III, 1, 1492
  • [Enter a Servant and PANDARUS]
  • [Enter a Servant and PANDARUS]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter a Servant and PANDARUS]

46 III, 1, 1534
  • [Enter PARIS and HELEN, attended]
  • [Enter PARIS and HELEN, attended]
  • Servant. Sodden business! there's a stewed phrase indeed!

    (stage directions). [Enter PARIS and HELEN, attended]

47 III, 1, 1632
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Pandarus. I will, sweet queen.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

48 III, 1, 1633
  • [A retreat sounded]
  • [A retreat sounded]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [A retreat sounded]

49 III, 1, 1646
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Paris. Sweet, above thought I love thee.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

50 III, 2, 1647
  • [Enter PANDARUS and Troilus's Boy, meeting]
  • [Enter PANDARUS and Troilus's Boy, meeting]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS and Troilus's Boy, meeting]

51 III, 2, 1655
  • [Exit Boy]
  • [Exit Boy]
  • Troilus. Sirrah, walk off.

    (stage directions). [Exit Boy]

52 III, 2, 1666
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Pandarus. Walk here i' the orchard, I'll bring her straight.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

53 III, 2, 1679
  • [Re-enter PANDARUS]
  • [Re-enter PANDARUS]
  • Troilus. I am giddy; expectation whirls me round.
    The imaginary relish is so sweet
    That it enchants my sense: what will it be,
    When that the watery palate tastes indeed
    Love's thrice repured nectar? death, I fear me,
    Swooning destruction, or some joy too fine,
    Too subtle-potent, tuned too sharp in sweetness,
    For the capacity of my ruder powers:
    I fear it much; and I do fear besides,
    That I shall lose distinction in my joys;
    As doth a battle, when they charge on heaps
    The enemy flying.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter PANDARUS]

54 III, 2, 1686
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Pandarus. She's making her ready, she'll come straight: you
    must be witty now. She does so blush, and fetches
    her wind so short, as if she were frayed with a
    sprite: I'll fetch her. It is the prettiest
    villain: she fetches her breath as short as a
    new-ta'en sparrow.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

55 III, 2, 1692
  • [Re-enter PANDARUS with CRESSIDA]
  • [Re-enter PANDARUS with CRESSIDA]
  • Troilus. Even such a passion doth embrace my bosom:
    My heart beats thicker than a feverous pulse;
    And all my powers do their bestowing lose,
    Like vassalage at unawares encountering
    The eye of majesty.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter PANDARUS with CRESSIDA]

56 III, 2, 1713
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Pandarus. Words pay no debts, give her deeds: but she'll
    bereave you o' the deeds too, if she call your
    activity in question. What, billing again? Here's
    'In witness whereof the parties interchangeably'--
    Come in, come in: I'll go get a fire.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

57 III, 2, 1751
  • [Re-enter PANDARUS]
  • [Re-enter PANDARUS]
  • Cressida. Will you walk in, my lord?

    (stage directions). [Re-enter PANDARUS]

58 III, 2, 1863
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Pandarus. Amen. Whereupon I will show you a chamber with a
    bed; which bed, because it shall not speak of your
    pretty encounters, press it to death: away!
    And Cupid grant all tongue-tied maidens here
    Bed, chamber, Pandar to provide this gear!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

59 III, 3, 1864
  • [Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, DIOMEDES, NESTOR, AJAX,]
    MENELAUS, and CALCHAS]
  • [Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, DIOMEDES, NESTOR, AJAX,]
    MENELAUS, and CALCHAS]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, DIOMEDES, NESTOR, AJAX,]
    MENELAUS, and CALCHAS]

60 III, 3, 1904
  • [Exeunt DIOMEDES and CALCHAS]
  • [Exeunt DIOMEDES and CALCHAS]
  • Diomedes. This shall I undertake; and 'tis a burden
    Which I am proud to bear.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt DIOMEDES and CALCHAS]

61 III, 3, 1905
  • [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS, before their tent]
  • [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS, before their tent]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt DIOMEDES and CALCHAS]

    (stage directions). [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS, before their tent]

62 III, 3, 1930
  • [Exeunt AGAMEMNON and NESTOR]
  • [Exeunt AGAMEMNON and NESTOR]
  • Agamemnon. The better.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt AGAMEMNON and NESTOR]

63 III, 3, 1933
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Menelaus. How do you? how do you?

    (stage directions). [Exit]

64 III, 3, 1940
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Ajax. Ay, and good next day too.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

65 III, 3, 2096
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Ulysses. Is that a wonder?
    The providence that's in a watchful state
    Knows almost every grain of Plutus' gold,
    Finds bottom in the uncomprehensive deeps,
    Keeps place with thought and almost, like the gods,
    Does thoughts unveil in their dumb cradles.
    There is a mystery--with whom relation
    Durst never meddle--in the soul of state;
    Which hath an operation more divine
    Than breath or pen can give expressure to:
    All the commerce that you have had with Troy
    As perfectly is ours as yours, my lord;
    And better would it fit Achilles much
    To throw down Hector than Polyxena:
    But it must grieve young Pyrrhus now at home,
    When fame shall in our islands sound her trump,
    And all the Greekish girls shall tripping sing,
    'Great Hector's sister did Achilles win,
    But our great Ajax bravely beat down him.'
    Farewell, my lord: I as your lover speak;
    The fool slides o'er the ice that you should break.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

66 III, 3, 2191
  • [Exeunt ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]
  • [Exeunt ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]
  • Achilles. My mind is troubled, like a fountain stirr'd;
    And I myself see not the bottom of it.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]

67 III, 3, 2195
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Thersites. Would the fountain of your mind were clear again,
    that I might water an ass at it! I had rather be a
    tick in a sheep than such a valiant ignorance.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

68 IV, 1, 2196
  • [Enter, from one side, AENEAS, and Servant with a]
    torch; from the other, PA...
  • [Enter, from one side, AENEAS, and Servant with a]
    torch; from the other, PARIS, DEIPHOBUS, ANTENOR,
    DIOMEDES, and others, with torches]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter, from one side, AENEAS, and Servant with a]
    torch; from the other, PARIS, DEIPHOBUS, ANTENOR,
    DIOMEDES, and others, with torches]

69 IV, 1, 2253
  • [Exit with Servant]
  • [Exit with Servant]
  • Aeneas. Good morrow, all.

    (stage directions). [Exit with Servant]

70 IV, 1, 2284
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Paris. Fair Diomed, you do as chapmen do,
    Dispraise the thing that you desire to buy:
    But we in silence hold this virtue well,
    We'll but commend what we intend to sell.
    Here lies our way.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

71 IV, 2, 2285
  • [Enter TROILUS and CRESSIDA]
  • [Enter TROILUS and CRESSIDA]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter TROILUS and CRESSIDA]

72 IV, 2, 2314
  • [Enter PANDARUS]
  • [Enter PANDARUS]
  • Cressida. A pestilence on him! now will he be mocking:
    I shall have such a life!

    (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS]

73 IV, 2, 2336
  • [Exeunt TROILUS and CRESSIDA]
  • [Exeunt TROILUS and CRESSIDA]
  • Cressida. Come, you are deceived, I think of no such thing.
    [Knocking within]
    How earnestly they knock! Pray you, come in:
    I would not for half Troy have you seen here.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS and CRESSIDA]

74 IV, 2, 2339
  • [Enter AENEAS]
  • [Enter AENEAS]
  • Pandarus. Who's there? what's the matter? will you beat
    down the door? How now! what's the matter?

    (stage directions). [Enter AENEAS]

75 IV, 2, 2354
  • [Re-enter TROILUS]
  • [Re-enter TROILUS]
  • Aeneas. Who!--nay, then: come, come, you'll do him wrong
    ere you're ware: you'll be so true to him, to be
    false to him: do not you know of him, but yet go
    fetch him hither; go.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter TROILUS]

76 IV, 2, 2372
  • [Exeunt TROILUS and AENEAS]
  • [Exeunt TROILUS and AENEAS]
  • Aeneas. Good, good, my lord; the secrets of nature
    Have not more gift in taciturnity.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS and AENEAS]

77 IV, 2, 2376
  • [Re-enter CRESSIDA]
  • [Re-enter CRESSIDA]
  • Pandarus. Is't possible? no sooner got but lost? The devil
    take Antenor! the young prince will go mad: a
    plague upon Antenor! I would they had broke 's neck!

    (stage directions). [Re-enter CRESSIDA]

78 IV, 2, 2408
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Cressida. Tear my bright hair and scratch my praised cheeks,
    Crack my clear voice with sobs and break my heart
    With sounding Troilus. I will not go from Troy.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

79 IV, 3, 2409
  • [Enter PARIS, TROILUS, AENEAS, DEIPHOBUS, ANTENOR,]
    and DIOMEDES]
  • [Enter PARIS, TROILUS, AENEAS, DEIPHOBUS, ANTENOR,]
    and DIOMEDES]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter PARIS, TROILUS, AENEAS, DEIPHOBUS, ANTENOR,]
    and DIOMEDES]

80 IV, 3, 2421
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Troilus. Walk into her house;
    I'll bring her to the Grecian presently:
    And to his hand when I deliver her,
    Think it an altar, and thy brother Troilus
    A priest there offering to it his own heart.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

81 IV, 3, 2425
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Paris. I know what 'tis to love;
    And would, as I shall pity, I could help!
    Please you walk in, my lords.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

82 IV, 4, 2426
  • [Enter PANDARUS and CRESSIDA]
  • [Enter PANDARUS and CRESSIDA]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS and CRESSIDA]

83 IV, 4, 2441
  • [Embracing him]
  • [Embracing him]
  • Cressida. O Troilus! Troilus!

    (stage directions). [Embracing him]

84 IV, 4, 2485
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Pandarus. Where are my tears? rain, to lay this wind, or
    my heart will be blown up by the root.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

85 IV, 4, 2580
  • [Exeunt TROILUS, CRESSIDA, and DIOMEDES]
  • [Exeunt TROILUS, CRESSIDA, and DIOMEDES]
  • Troilus. Come, to the port. I'll tell thee, Diomed,
    This brave shall oft make thee to hide thy head.
    Lady, give me your hand, and, as we walk,
    To our own selves bend we our needful talk.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS, CRESSIDA, and DIOMEDES]

86 IV, 4, 2581
  • [Trumpet within]
  • [Trumpet within]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS, CRESSIDA, and DIOMEDES]

    (stage directions). [Trumpet within]

87 IV, 4, 2592
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Aeneas. Yea, with a bridegroom's fresh alacrity,
    Let us address to tend on Hector's heels:
    The glory of our Troy doth this day lie
    On his fair worth and single chivalry.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

88 IV, 5, 2593
  • [Enter AJAX, armed; AGAMEMNON, ACHILLES, PATROCLUS,]
    MENELAUS, ULYSSES, NEST...
  • [Enter AJAX, armed; AGAMEMNON, ACHILLES, PATROCLUS,]
    MENELAUS, ULYSSES, NESTOR, and others]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter AJAX, armed; AGAMEMNON, ACHILLES, PATROCLUS,]
    MENELAUS, ULYSSES, NESTOR, and others]

89 IV, 5, 2607
  • [Trumpet sounds]
  • [Trumpet sounds]
  • Ajax. Thou, trumpet, there's my purse.
    Now crack thy lungs, and split thy brazen pipe:
    Blow, villain, till thy sphered bias cheek
    Outswell the colic of puff'd Aquilon:
    Come, stretch thy chest and let thy eyes spout blood;
    Thou blow'st for Hector.

    (stage directions). [Trumpet sounds]

90 IV, 5, 2614
  • [Enter DIOMEDES, with CRESSIDA]
  • [Enter DIOMEDES, with CRESSIDA]
  • Ulysses. 'Tis he, I ken the manner of his gait;
    He rises on the toe: that spirit of his
    In aspiration lifts him from the earth.

    (stage directions). [Enter DIOMEDES, with CRESSIDA]

91 IV, 5, 2658
  • [Exit with CRESSIDA]
  • [Exit with CRESSIDA]
  • Diomedes. Lady, a word: I'll bring you to your father.

    (stage directions). [Exit with CRESSIDA]

92 IV, 5, 2670
  • [Trumpet within]
  • [Trumpet within]
  • Ulysses. Fie, fie upon her!
    There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip,
    Nay, her foot speaks; her wanton spirits look out
    At every joint and motive of her body.
    O, these encounterers, so glib of tongue,
    That give accosting welcome ere it comes,
    And wide unclasp the tables of their thoughts
    To every ticklish reader! set them down
    For sluttish spoils of opportunity
    And daughters of the game.

    (stage directions). [Trumpet within]

93 IV, 5, 2701
  • [Re-enter DIOMEDES]
  • [Re-enter DIOMEDES]
  • Achilles. A maiden battle, then? O, I perceive you.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter DIOMEDES]

94 IV, 5, 2708
  • [AJAX and HECTOR enter the lists]
  • [AJAX and HECTOR enter the lists]
  • Agamemnon. Here is Sir Diomed. Go, gentle knight,
    Stand by our Ajax: as you and Lord AEneas
    Consent upon the order of their fight,
    So be it; either to the uttermost,
    Or else a breath: the combatants being kin
    Half stints their strife before their strokes begin.

    (stage directions). [AJAX and HECTOR enter the lists]

95 IV, 5, 2728
  • [Alarum. Hector and Ajax fight]
  • [Alarum. Hector and Ajax fight]
  • Ulysses. The youngest son of Priam, a true knight,
    Not yet mature, yet matchless, firm of word,
    Speaking in deeds and deedless in his tongue;
    Not soon provoked nor being provoked soon calm'd:
    His heart and hand both open and both free;
    For what he has he gives, what thinks he shows;
    Yet gives he not till judgment guide his bounty,
    Nor dignifies an impure thought with breath;
    Manly as Hector, but more dangerous;
    For Hector in his blaze of wrath subscribes
    To tender objects, but he in heat of action
    Is more vindicative than jealous love:
    They call him Troilus, and on him erect
    A second hope, as fairly built as Hector.
    Thus says AEneas; one that knows the youth
    Even to his inches, and with private soul
    Did in great Ilion thus translate him to me.

    (stage directions). [Alarum. Hector and Ajax fight]

96 IV, 5, 2735
  • [Trumpets cease]
  • [Trumpets cease]
  • Diomedes. You must no more.

    (stage directions). [Trumpets cease]

97 IV, 5, 2909
  • [Exeunt all except TROILUS and ULYSSES]
  • [Exeunt all except TROILUS and ULYSSES]
  • Agamemnon. First, all you peers of Greece, go to my tent;
    There in the full convive we: afterwards,
    As Hector's leisure and your bounties shall
    Concur together, severally entreat him.
    Beat loud the tabourines, let the trumpets blow,
    That this great soldier may his welcome know.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt all except TROILUS and ULYSSES]

98 IV, 5, 2928
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Troilus. O, sir, to such as boasting show their scars
    A mock is due. Will you walk on, my lord?
    She was beloved, she loved; she is, and doth:
    But still sweet love is food for fortune's tooth.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

99 V, 1, 2929
  • [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]
  • [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]

100 V, 1, 2934
  • [Enter THERSITES]
  • [Enter THERSITES]
  • Patroclus. Here comes Thersites.

    (stage directions). [Enter THERSITES]

101 V, 1, 2978
  • [Exeunt ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]
  • [Exeunt ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]
  • Achilles. My sweet Patroclus, I am thwarted quite
    From my great purpose in to-morrow's battle.
    Here is a letter from Queen Hecuba,
    A token from her daughter, my fair love,
    Both taxing me and gaging me to keep
    An oath that I have sworn. I will not break it:
    Fall Greeks; fail fame; honour or go or stay;
    My major vow lies here, this I'll obey.
    Come, come, Thersites, help to trim my tent:
    This night in banqueting must all be spent.
    Away, Patroclus!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt ACHILLES and PATROCLUS]

102 V, 1, 3007
  • [Re-enter ACHILLES]
  • [Re-enter ACHILLES]
  • Ulysses. Here comes himself to guide you.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter ACHILLES]

103 V, 1, 3019
  • [Exeunt AGAMEMNON and MENELAUS]
  • [Exeunt AGAMEMNON and MENELAUS]
  • Agamemnon. Good night.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt AGAMEMNON and MENELAUS]

104 V, 1, 3030
  • [Exit DIOMEDES; ULYSSES and TROILUS following]
  • [Exit DIOMEDES; ULYSSES and TROILUS following]
  • Hector. And so, good night.

    (stage directions). [Exit DIOMEDES; ULYSSES and TROILUS following]

105 V, 1, 3032
  • [Exeunt ACHILLES, HECTOR, AJAX, and NESTOR]
  • [Exeunt ACHILLES, HECTOR, AJAX, and NESTOR]
  • Achilles. Come, come, enter my tent.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt ACHILLES, HECTOR, AJAX, and NESTOR]

106 V, 1, 3044
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Thersites. That same Diomed's a false-hearted rogue, a most
    unjust knave; I will no more trust him when he leers
    than I will a serpent when he hisses: he will spend
    his mouth, and promise, like Brabbler the hound:
    but when he performs, astronomers foretell it; it
    is prodigious, there will come some change; the sun
    borrows of the moon, when Diomed keeps his
    word. I will rather leave to see Hector, than
    not to dog him: they say he keeps a Trojan
    drab, and uses the traitor Calchas' tent: I'll
    after. Nothing but lechery! all incontinent varlets!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

107 V, 2, 3045
  • [Enter DIOMEDES]
  • [Enter DIOMEDES]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter DIOMEDES]

108 V, 2, 3053
  • [Enter CRESSIDA]
  • [Enter CRESSIDA]
  • Ulysses. Stand where the torch may not discover us.

    (stage directions). [Enter CRESSIDA]

109 V, 2, 3057
  • [Whispers]
  • [Whispers]
  • Cressida. Now, my sweet guardian! Hark, a word with you.

    (stage directions). [Whispers]

110 V, 2, 3120
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Cressida. I'll fetch you one.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

111 V, 2, 3125
  • [Re-enter CRESSIDA]
  • [Re-enter CRESSIDA]
  • Troilus. Fear me not, sweet lord;
    I will not be myself, nor have cognition
    Of what I feel: I am all patience.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter CRESSIDA]

112 V, 2, 3182
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Cressida. Good night: I prithee, come.
    [Exit DIOMEDES]
    Troilus, farewell! one eye yet looks on thee
    But with my heart the other eye doth see.
    Ah, poor our sex! this fault in us I find,
    The error of our eye directs our mind:
    What error leads must err; O, then conclude
    Minds sway'd by eyes are full of turpitude.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

113 V, 2, 3257
  • [Enter AENEAS]
  • [Enter AENEAS]
  • Ulysses. O, contain yourself
    Your passion draws ears hither.

    (stage directions). [Enter AENEAS]

114 V, 2, 3266
  • [Exeunt TROILUS, AENEAS, and ULYSSES]
  • [Exeunt TROILUS, AENEAS, and ULYSSES]
  • Troilus. Accept distracted thanks.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS, AENEAS, and ULYSSES]

115 V, 2, 3274
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Thersites. Would I could meet that rogue Diomed! I would
    croak like a raven; I would bode, I would bode.
    Patroclus will give me any thing for the
    intelligence of this whore: the parrot will not
    do more for an almond than he for a commodious drab.
    Lechery, lechery; still, wars and lechery; nothing
    else holds fashion: a burning devil take them!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

116 V, 3, 3275
  • [Enter HECTOR and ANDROMACHE]
  • [Enter HECTOR and ANDROMACHE]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter HECTOR and ANDROMACHE]

117 V, 3, 3283
  • [Enter CASSANDRA]
  • [Enter CASSANDRA]
  • Hector. No more, I say.

    (stage directions). [Enter CASSANDRA]

118 V, 3, 3311
  • [Exit CASSANDRA]
  • [Exit CASSANDRA]
  • Andromache. Cassandra, call my father to persuade.

    (stage directions). [Exit CASSANDRA]

119 V, 3, 3343
  • [Re-enter CASSANDRA, with PRIAM]
  • [Re-enter CASSANDRA, with PRIAM]
  • Troilus. Who should withhold me?
    Not fate, obedience, nor the hand of Mars
    Beckoning with fiery truncheon my retire;
    Not Priamus and Hecuba on knees,
    Their eyes o'ergalled with recourse of tears;
    Not you, my brother, with your true sword drawn,
    Opposed to hinder me, should stop my way,
    But by my ruin.

    (stage directions). [Re-enter CASSANDRA, with PRIAM]

120 V, 3, 3368
  • [Exit ANDROMACHE]
  • [Exit ANDROMACHE]
  • Hector. Andromache, I am offended with you:
    Upon the love you bear me, get you in.

    (stage directions). [Exit ANDROMACHE]

121 V, 3, 3382
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Cassandra. Farewell: yet, soft! Hector! take my leave:
    Thou dost thyself and all our Troy deceive.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

122 V, 3, 3387
  • [Exeunt severally PRIAM and HECTOR. Alarums]
  • [Exeunt severally PRIAM and HECTOR. Alarums]
  • Priam. Farewell: the gods with safety stand about thee!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt severally PRIAM and HECTOR. Alarums]

123 V, 3, 3390
  • [Enter PANDARUS]
  • [Enter PANDARUS]
  • Troilus. They are at it, hark! Proud Diomed, believe,
    I come to lose my arm, or win my sleeve.

    (stage directions). [Enter PANDARUS]

124 V, 3, 3408
  • [Exeunt severally]
  • [Exeunt severally]
  • Troilus. Words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart:
    The effect doth operate another way.
    [Tearing the letter]
    Go, wind, to wind, there turn and change together.
    My love with words and errors still she feeds;
    But edifies another with her deeds.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt severally]

125 V, 4, 3409
  • [Alarums: excursions. Enter THERSITES]
  • [Alarums: excursions. Enter THERSITES]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt severally]

    (stage directions). [Alarums: excursions. Enter THERSITES]

126 V, 4, 3428
  • [Enter DIOMEDES, TROILUS following]
  • [Enter DIOMEDES, TROILUS following]
  • Thersites. Now they are clapper-clawing one another; I'll go
    look on. That dissembling abominable varlets Diomed,
    has got that same scurvy doting foolish young knave's
    sleeve of Troy there in his helm: I would fain see
    them meet; that that same young Trojan ass, that
    loves the whore there, might send that Greekish
    whore-masterly villain, with the sleeve, back to the
    dissembling luxurious drab, of a sleeveless errand.
    O' the t'other side, the policy of those crafty
    swearing rascals, that stale old mouse-eaten dry
    cheese, Nestor, and that same dog-fox, Ulysses, is
    not proved worthy a blackberry: they set me up, in
    policy, that mongrel cur, Ajax, against that dog of
    as bad a kind, Achilles: and now is the cur Ajax
    prouder than the cur Achilles, and will not arm
    to-day; whereupon the Grecians begin to proclaim
    barbarism, and policy grows into an ill opinion.
    Soft! here comes sleeve, and t'other.

    (stage directions). [Enter DIOMEDES, TROILUS following]

127 V, 4, 3437
  • [Exeunt TROILUS and DIOMEDES, fighting]
  • [Exeunt TROILUS and DIOMEDES, fighting]
  • Thersites. Hold thy whore, Grecian!--now for thy whore,
    Trojan!--now the sleeve, now the sleeve!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS and DIOMEDES, fighting]

128 V, 4, 3438
  • [Enter HECTOR]
  • [Enter HECTOR]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt TROILUS and DIOMEDES, fighting]

    (stage directions). [Enter HECTOR]

129 V, 4, 3444
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Hector. I do believe thee: live.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

130 V, 4, 3451
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Thersites. God-a-mercy, that thou wilt believe me; but a
    plague break thy neck for frightening me! What's
    become of the wenching rogues? I think they have
    swallowed one another: I would laugh at that
    miracle: yet, in a sort, lechery eats itself.
    I'll seek them.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

131 V, 5, 3452
  • [Enter DIOMEDES and a Servant]
  • [Enter DIOMEDES and a Servant]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter DIOMEDES and a Servant]

132 V, 5, 3459
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Servant. I go, my lord.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

133 V, 5, 3460
  • [Enter AGAMEMNON]
  • [Enter AGAMEMNON]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter AGAMEMNON]

134 V, 5, 3472
  • [Enter NESTOR]
  • [Enter NESTOR]
  • Agamemnon. Renew, renew! The fierce Polydamas
    Hath beat down Menon: bastard Margarelon
    Hath Doreus prisoner,
    And stands colossus-wise, waving his beam,
    Upon the pashed corses of the kings
    Epistrophus and Cedius: Polyxenes is slain,
    Amphimachus and Thoas deadly hurt,
    Patroclus ta'en or slain, and Palamedes
    Sore hurt and bruised: the dreadful Sagittary
    Appals our numbers: haste we, Diomed,
    To reinforcement, or we perish all.

    (stage directions). [Enter NESTOR]

135 V, 5, 3486
  • [Enter ULYSSES]
  • [Enter ULYSSES]
  • Nestor. Go, bear Patroclus' body to Achilles;
    And bid the snail-paced Ajax arm for shame.
    There is a thousand Hectors in the field:
    Now here he fights on Galathe his horse,
    And there lacks work; anon he's there afoot,
    And there they fly or die, like scaled sculls
    Before the belching whale; then is he yonder,
    And there the strawy Greeks, ripe for his edge,
    Fall down before him, like the mower's swath:
    Here, there, and every where, he leaves and takes,
    Dexterity so obeying appetite
    That what he will he does, and does so much
    That proof is call'd impossibility.

    (stage directions). [Enter ULYSSES]

136 V, 5, 3500
  • [Enter AJAX]
  • [Enter AJAX]
  • Ulysses. O, courage, courage, princes! great Achilles
    Is arming, weeping, cursing, vowing vengeance:
    Patroclus' wounds have roused his drowsy blood,
    Together with his mangled Myrmidons,
    That noseless, handless, hack'd and chipp'd, come to him,
    Crying on Hector. Ajax hath lost a friend
    And foams at mouth, and he is arm'd and at it,
    Roaring for Troilus, who hath done to-day
    Mad and fantastic execution,
    Engaging and redeeming of himself
    With such a careless force and forceless care
    As if that luck, in very spite of cunning,
    Bade him win all.

    (stage directions). [Enter AJAX]

137 V, 5, 3502
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Ajax. Troilus! thou coward Troilus!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

138 V, 5, 3505
  • [Enter ACHILLES]
  • [Enter ACHILLES]
  • Nestor. So, so, we draw together.

    (stage directions). [Enter ACHILLES]

139 V, 5, 3510
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Achilles. Where is this Hector?
    Come, come, thou boy-queller, show thy face;
    Know what it is to meet Achilles angry:
    Hector? where's Hector? I will none but Hector.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

140 V, 6, 3511
  • [Enter AJAX]
  • [Enter AJAX]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter AJAX]

141 V, 6, 3513
  • [Enter DIOMEDES]
  • [Enter DIOMEDES]
  • Ajax. Troilus, thou coward Troilus, show thy head!

    (stage directions). [Enter DIOMEDES]

142 V, 6, 3519
  • [Enter TROILUS]
  • [Enter TROILUS]
  • Ajax. Were I the general, thou shouldst have my office
    Ere that correction. Troilus, I say! what, Troilus!

    (stage directions). [Enter TROILUS]

143 V, 6, 3526
  • [Exeunt, fighting]
  • [Exeunt, fighting]
  • Troilus. Come, both you cogging Greeks; have at you both!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt, fighting]

144 V, 6, 3527
  • [Enter HECTOR]
  • [Enter HECTOR]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt, fighting]

    (stage directions). [Enter HECTOR]

145 V, 6, 3529
  • [Enter ACHILLES]
  • [Enter ACHILLES]
  • Hector. Yea, Troilus? O, well fought, my youngest brother!

    (stage directions). [Enter ACHILLES]

146 V, 6, 3537
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Achilles. I do disdain thy courtesy, proud Trojan:
    Be happy that my arms are out of use:
    My rest and negligence befriends thee now,
    But thou anon shalt hear of me again;
    Till when, go seek thy fortune.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

147 V, 6, 3541
  • [Re-enter TROILUS]
  • [Re-enter TROILUS]
  • Hector. Fare thee well:
    I would have been much more a fresher man,
    Had I expected thee. How now, my brother!

    (stage directions). [Re-enter TROILUS]

148 V, 6, 3547
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Troilus. Ajax hath ta'en AEneas: shall it be?
    No, by the flame of yonder glorious heaven,
    He shall not carry him: I'll be ta'en too,
    Or bring him off: fate, hear me what I say!
    I reck not though I end my life to-day.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

149 V, 6, 3548
  • [Enter one in sumptuous armour]
  • [Enter one in sumptuous armour]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter one in sumptuous armour]

150 V, 6, 3555
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Hector. Stand, stand, thou Greek; thou art a goodly mark:
    No? wilt thou not? I like thy armour well;
    I'll frush it and unlock the rivets all,
    But I'll be master of it: wilt thou not,
    beast, abide?
    Why, then fly on, I'll hunt thee for thy hide.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

151 V, 7, 3556
  • [Enter ACHILLES, with Myrmidons]
  • [Enter ACHILLES, with Myrmidons]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter ACHILLES, with Myrmidons]

152 V, 7, 3572
  • [Exeunt PARIS and MENELAUS]
  • [Exeunt PARIS and MENELAUS]
  • Thersites. The cuckold and the cuckold-maker are at it. Now,
    bull! now, dog! 'Loo, Paris, 'loo! now my double-
    henned sparrow! 'loo, Paris, 'loo! The bull has the
    game: ware horns, ho!

    (stage directions). [Exeunt PARIS and MENELAUS]

153 V, 7, 3573
  • [Enter MARGARELON]
  • [Enter MARGARELON]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt PARIS and MENELAUS]

    (stage directions). [Enter MARGARELON]

154 V, 7, 3584
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Thersites. I am a bastard too; I love bastards: I am a bastard
    begot, bastard instructed, bastard in mind, bastard
    in valour, in every thing illegitimate. One bear will
    not bite another, and wherefore should one bastard?
    Take heed, the quarrel's most ominous to us: if the
    son of a whore fight for a whore, he tempts judgment:
    farewell, bastard.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

155 V, 7, 3586
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Margarelon. The devil take thee, coward!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

156 V, 8, 3587
  • [Enter HECTOR]
  • [Enter HECTOR]
  • (stage directions). [Exit]

    (stage directions). [Enter HECTOR]

157 V, 8, 3594
  • [Enter ACHILLES and Myrmidons]
  • [Enter ACHILLES and Myrmidons]
  • Hector. Most putrefied core, so fair without,
    Thy goodly armour thus hath cost thy life.
    Now is my day's work done; I'll take good breath:
    Rest, sword; thou hast thy fill of blood and death.
    [Puts off his helmet and hangs his shield]
    behind him]

    (stage directions). [Enter ACHILLES and Myrmidons]

158 V, 8, 3616
  • [Exeunt]
  • [Exeunt]
  • Achilles. The dragon wing of night o'erspreads the earth,
    And, stickler-like, the armies separates.
    My half-supp'd sword, that frankly would have fed,
    Pleased with this dainty bait, thus goes to bed.
    [Sheathes his sword]
    Come, tie his body to my horse's tail;
    Along the field I will the Trojan trail.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt]

159 V, 9, 3617
  • [Enter AGAMEMNON, AJAX, MENELAUS, NESTOR, DIOMEDES,]
    and others, marching. S...
  • [Enter AGAMEMNON, AJAX, MENELAUS, NESTOR, DIOMEDES,]
    and others, marching. Shouts within]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt]

    (stage directions). [Enter AGAMEMNON, AJAX, MENELAUS, NESTOR, DIOMEDES,]
    and others, marching. Shouts within]

160 V, 9, 3630
  • [Exeunt, marching]
  • [Exeunt, marching]
  • Agamemnon. March patiently along: let one be sent
    To pray Achilles see us at our tent.
    If in his death the gods have us befriended,
    Great Troy is ours, and our sharp wars are ended.

    (stage directions). [Exeunt, marching]

161 V, 10, 3631
  • [Enter AENEAS and Trojans]
  • [Enter AENEAS and Trojans]
  • (stage directions). [Exeunt, marching]

    (stage directions). [Enter AENEAS and Trojans]

162 V, 10, 3634
  • [Enter TROILUS]
  • [Enter TROILUS]
  • Aeneas. Stand, ho! yet are we masters of the field:
    Never go home; here starve we out the night.

    (stage directions). [Enter TROILUS]

163 V, 10, 3671
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Troilus. Hence, broker-lackey! ignomy and shame
    Pursue thy life, and live aye with thy name!

    (stage directions). [Exit]

164 V, 10, 3694
  • [Exit]
  • [Exit]
  • Pandarus. A goodly medicine for my aching bones! O world!
    world! world! thus is the poor agent despised!
    O traitors and bawds, how earnestly are you set
    a-work, and how ill requited! why should our
    endeavour be so loved and the performance so loathed?
    what verse for it? what instance for it? Let me see:
    Full merrily the humble-bee doth sing,
    Till he hath lost his honey and his sting;
    And being once subdued in armed tail,
    Sweet honey and sweet notes together fail.
    Good traders in the flesh, set this in your
    painted cloths.
    As many as be here of pander's hall,
    Your eyes, half out, weep out at Pandar's fall;
    Or if you cannot weep, yet give some groans,
    Though not for me, yet for your aching bones.
    Brethren and sisters of the hold-door trade,
    Some two months hence my will shall here be made:
    It should be now, but that my fear is this,
    Some galled goose of Winchester would hiss:
    Till then I'll sweat and seek about for eases,
    And at that time bequeathe you my diseases.

    (stage directions). [Exit]

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