Speeches (Lines) for Archbishop Cranmer in "History of Henry VIII"

Total: 21
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# Act / Scene Speech text
1 V / 1
  • [Aside]
    I am fearful: wherefore frowns he thus?
    'Tis his aspect of terro...
  • [Aside]
    I am fearful: wherefore frowns he thus?
    'Tis his aspect of terror. All's not well.
  • Henry VIII. Avoid the gallery.
    [LOVELL seems to stay]
    Ha! I have said. Be gone. What!

    Archbishop Cranmer. [Aside]
    I am fearful: wherefore frowns he thus?
    'Tis his aspect of terror. All's not well.

2 V / 1
  • [Kneeling] It is my duty
    To attend your highness' pleasure.
  • [Kneeling] It is my duty
    To attend your highness' pleasure.
  • Henry VIII. How now, my lord! you desire to know
    Wherefore I sent for you.

    Archbishop Cranmer. [Kneeling] It is my duty
    To attend your highness' pleasure.

3 V / 1
  • [Kneeling]
    I humbly thank your highness;
    And am right glad to catch this...
  • [Kneeling]
    I humbly thank your highness;
    And am right glad to catch this good occasion
    Most throughly to be winnow'd, where my chaff
    And corn shall fly asunder: for, I know,
    There's none stands under more calumnious tongues
    Than I myself, poor man.
  • Henry VIII. Pray you, arise,
    My good and gracious Lord of Canterbury.
    Come, you and I must walk a turn together;
    I have news to tell you: come, come, give me your hand.
    Ah, my good lord, I grieve at what I speak,
    And am right sorry to repeat what follows
    I have, and most unwillingly, of late
    Heard many grievous, I do say, my lord,
    Grievous complaints of you; which, being consider'd,
    Have moved us and our council, that you shall
    This morning come before us; where, I know,
    You cannot with such freedom purge yourself,
    But that, till further trial in those charges
    Which will require your answer, you must take
    Your patience to you, and be well contented
    To make your house our Tower: you a brother of us,
    It fits we thus proceed, or else no witness
    Would come against you.

    Archbishop Cranmer. [Kneeling]
    I humbly thank your highness;
    And am right glad to catch this good occasion
    Most throughly to be winnow'd, where my chaff
    And corn shall fly asunder: for, I know,
    There's none stands under more calumnious tongues
    Than I myself, poor man.

4 V / 1
  • Most dread liege,
    The good I stand on is my truth and honesty:
    If they s...
  • Most dread liege,
    The good I stand on is my truth and honesty:
    If they shall fail, I, with mine enemies,
    Will triumph o'er my person; which I weigh not,
    Being of those virtues vacant. I fear nothing
    What can be said against me.
  • Henry VIII. Stand up, good Canterbury:
    Thy truth and thy integrity is rooted
    In us, thy friend: give me thy hand, stand up:
    Prithee, let's walk. Now, by my holidame.
    What manner of man are you? My lord, I look'd
    You would have given me your petition, that
    I should have ta'en some pains to bring together
    Yourself and your accusers; and to have heard you,
    Without indurance, further.

    Archbishop Cranmer. Most dread liege,
    The good I stand on is my truth and honesty:
    If they shall fail, I, with mine enemies,
    Will triumph o'er my person; which I weigh not,
    Being of those virtues vacant. I fear nothing
    What can be said against me.

5 V / 1
  • God and your majesty
    Protect mine innocence, or I fall into
    The trap is...
  • God and your majesty
    Protect mine innocence, or I fall into
    The trap is laid for me!
  • Henry VIII. Know you not
    How your state stands i' the world, with the whole world?
    Your enemies are many, and not small; their practises
    Must bear the same proportion; and not ever
    The justice and the truth o' the question carries
    The due o' the verdict with it: at what ease
    Might corrupt minds procure knaves as corrupt
    To swear against you? such things have been done.
    You are potently opposed; and with a malice
    Of as great size. Ween you of better luck,
    I mean, in perjured witness, than your master,
    Whose minister you are, whiles here he lived
    Upon this naughty earth? Go to, go to;
    You take a precipice for no leap of danger,
    And woo your own destruction.

    Archbishop Cranmer. God and your majesty
    Protect mine innocence, or I fall into
    The trap is laid for me!

6 V / 2
  • I hope I am not too late; and yet the gentleman,
    That was sent to me from th...
  • I hope I am not too late; and yet the gentleman,
    That was sent to me from the council, pray'd me
    To make great haste. All fast? what means this? Ho!
    Who waits there? Sure, you know me?
  • Old Lady. An hundred marks! By this light, I'll ha' more.
    An ordinary groom is for such payment.
    I will have more, or scold it out of him.
    Said I for this, the girl was like to him?
    I will have more, or else unsay't; and now,
    While it is hot, I'll put it to the issue.

    Archbishop Cranmer. I hope I am not too late; and yet the gentleman,
    That was sent to me from the council, pray'd me
    To make great haste. All fast? what means this? Ho!
    Who waits there? Sure, you know me?

7 V / 2
  • Why?
  • Why?
  • Keeper. Yes, my lord;
    But yet I cannot help you.

    Archbishop Cranmer. Why?

8 V / 2
  • So.
  • So.
  • Keeper. Your grace must wait till you be call'd for.

    Archbishop Cranmer. So.

9 V / 2
  • [Aside]. 'Tis Butts,
    The king's physician: as he pass'd along,
    How earne...
  • [Aside]. 'Tis Butts,
    The king's physician: as he pass'd along,
    How earnestly he cast his eyes upon me!
    Pray heaven, he sound not my disgrace! For certain,
    This is of purpose laid by some that hate me--
    God turn their hearts! I never sought their malice--
    To quench mine honour: they would shame to make me
    Wait else at door, a fellow-counsellor,
    'Mong boys, grooms, and lackeys. But their pleasures
    Must be fulfill'd, and I attend with patience.
  • Doctor Butts. [Aside] This is a piece of malice. I am glad
    I came this way so happily: the king
    Shall understand it presently.

    Archbishop Cranmer. [Aside]. 'Tis Butts,
    The king's physician: as he pass'd along,
    How earnestly he cast his eyes upon me!
    Pray heaven, he sound not my disgrace! For certain,
    This is of purpose laid by some that hate me--
    God turn their hearts! I never sought their malice--
    To quench mine honour: they would shame to make me
    Wait else at door, a fellow-counsellor,
    'Mong boys, grooms, and lackeys. But their pleasures
    Must be fulfill'd, and I attend with patience.

10 V / 3
  • My good lords, hitherto, in all the progress
    Both of my life and office, I h...
  • My good lords, hitherto, in all the progress
    Both of my life and office, I have labour'd,
    And with no little study, that my teaching
    And the strong course of my authority
    Might go one way, and safely; and the end
    Was ever, to do well: nor is there living,
    I speak it with a single heart, my lords,
    A man that more detests, more stirs against,
    Both in his private conscience and his place,
    Defacers of a public peace, than I do.
    Pray heaven, the king may never find a heart
    With less allegiance in it! Men that make
    Envy and crooked malice nourishment
    Dare bite the best. I do beseech your lordships,
    That, in this case of justice, my accusers,
    Be what they will, may stand forth face to face,
    And freely urge against me.
  • Gardiner. Which reformation must be sudden too,
    My noble lords; for those that tame wild horses
    Pace 'em not in their hands to make 'em gentle,
    But stop their mouths with stubborn bits, and spur 'em,
    Till they obey the manage. If we suffer,
    Out of our easiness and childish pity
    To one man's honour, this contagious sickness,
    Farewell all physic: and what follows then?
    Commotions, uproars, with a general taint
    Of the whole state: as, of late days, our neighbours,
    The upper Germany, can dearly witness,
    Yet freshly pitied in our memories.

    Archbishop Cranmer. My good lords, hitherto, in all the progress
    Both of my life and office, I have labour'd,
    And with no little study, that my teaching
    And the strong course of my authority
    Might go one way, and safely; and the end
    Was ever, to do well: nor is there living,
    I speak it with a single heart, my lords,
    A man that more detests, more stirs against,
    Both in his private conscience and his place,
    Defacers of a public peace, than I do.
    Pray heaven, the king may never find a heart
    With less allegiance in it! Men that make
    Envy and crooked malice nourishment
    Dare bite the best. I do beseech your lordships,
    That, in this case of justice, my accusers,
    Be what they will, may stand forth face to face,
    And freely urge against me.

11 V / 3
  • Ah, my good Lord of Winchester, I thank you;
    You are always my good friend;...
  • Ah, my good Lord of Winchester, I thank you;
    You are always my good friend; if your will pass,
    I shall both find your lordship judge and juror,
    You are so merciful: I see your end;
    'Tis my undoing: love and meekness, lord,
    Become a churchman better than ambition:
    Win straying souls with modesty again,
    Cast none away. That I shall clear myself,
    Lay all the weight ye can upon my patience,
    I make as little doubt, as you do conscience
    In doing daily wrongs. I could say more,
    But reverence to your calling makes me modest.
  • Gardiner. My lord, because we have business of more moment,
    We will be short with you. 'Tis his highness' pleasure,
    And our consent, for better trial of you,
    From hence you be committed to the Tower;
    Where, being but a private man again,
    You shall know many dare accuse you boldly,
    More than, I fear, you are provided for.

    Archbishop Cranmer. Ah, my good Lord of Winchester, I thank you;
    You are always my good friend; if your will pass,
    I shall both find your lordship judge and juror,
    You are so merciful: I see your end;
    'Tis my undoing: love and meekness, lord,
    Become a churchman better than ambition:
    Win straying souls with modesty again,
    Cast none away. That I shall clear myself,
    Lay all the weight ye can upon my patience,
    I make as little doubt, as you do conscience
    In doing daily wrongs. I could say more,
    But reverence to your calling makes me modest.

12 V / 3
  • Is there no other way of mercy,
    But I must needs to the Tower, my lords?
  • Is there no other way of mercy,
    But I must needs to the Tower, my lords?
  • All. We are.

    Archbishop Cranmer. Is there no other way of mercy,
    But I must needs to the Tower, my lords?

13 V / 3
  • For me?
    Must I go like a traitor thither?
  • For me?
    Must I go like a traitor thither?
  • Gardiner. What other
    Would you expect? you are strangely troublesome.
    Let some o' the guard be ready there.

    Archbishop Cranmer. For me?
    Must I go like a traitor thither?

14 V / 3
  • Stay, good my lords,
    I have a little yet to say. Look there, my lords;
    B...
  • Stay, good my lords,
    I have a little yet to say. Look there, my lords;
    By virtue of that ring, I take my cause
    Out of the gripes of cruel men, and give it
    To a most noble judge, the king my master.
  • Gardiner. Receive him,
    And see him safe i' the Tower.

    Archbishop Cranmer. Stay, good my lords,
    I have a little yet to say. Look there, my lords;
    By virtue of that ring, I take my cause
    Out of the gripes of cruel men, and give it
    To a most noble judge, the king my master.

15 V / 3
  • The greatest monarch now alive may glory
    In such an honour: how may I deserv...
  • The greatest monarch now alive may glory
    In such an honour: how may I deserve it
    That am a poor and humble subject to you?
  • Henry VIII. Well, well, my lords, respect him;
    Take him, and use him well, he's worthy of it.
    I will say thus much for him, if a prince
    May be beholding to a subject, I
    Am, for his love and service, so to him.
    Make me no more ado, but all embrace him:
    Be friends, for shame, my lords! My Lord of
    Canterbury,
    I have a suit which you must not deny me;
    That is, a fair young maid that yet wants baptism,
    You must be godfather, and answer for her.

    Archbishop Cranmer. The greatest monarch now alive may glory
    In such an honour: how may I deserve it
    That am a poor and humble subject to you?

16 V / 3
  • And let heaven
    Witness, how dear I hold this confirmation.
  • And let heaven
    Witness, how dear I hold this confirmation.
  • Gardiner. With a true heart
    And brother-love I do it.

    Archbishop Cranmer. And let heaven
    Witness, how dear I hold this confirmation.

17 V / 5
  • [Kneeling] And to your royal grace, and the good queen,
    My noble partners, a...
  • [Kneeling] And to your royal grace, and the good queen,
    My noble partners, and myself, thus pray:
    All comfort, joy, in this most gracious lady,
    Heaven ever laid up to make parents happy,
    May hourly fall upon ye!
  • Garter. Heaven, from thy endless goodness, send prosperous
    life, long, and ever happy, to the high and mighty
    princess of England, Elizabeth!

    Archbishop Cranmer. [Kneeling] And to your royal grace, and the good queen,
    My noble partners, and myself, thus pray:
    All comfort, joy, in this most gracious lady,
    Heaven ever laid up to make parents happy,
    May hourly fall upon ye!

18 V / 5
  • Elizabeth.
  • Elizabeth.
  • Henry VIII. Thank you, good lord archbishop:
    What is her name?

    Archbishop Cranmer. Elizabeth.

19 V / 5
  • Amen.
  • Amen.
  • Henry VIII. Stand up, lord.
    [KING HENRY VIII kisses the child]
    With this kiss take my blessing: God protect thee!
    Into whose hand I give thy life.

    Archbishop Cranmer. Amen.

20 V / 5
  • Let me speak, sir,
    For heaven now bids me; and the words I utter
    Let non...
  • Let me speak, sir,
    For heaven now bids me; and the words I utter
    Let none think flattery, for they'll find 'em truth.
    This royal infant--heaven still move about her!--
    Though in her cradle, yet now promises
    Upon this land a thousand thousand blessings,
    Which time shall bring to ripeness: she shall be--
    But few now living can behold that goodness--
    A pattern to all princes living with her,
    And all that shall succeed: Saba was never
    More covetous of wisdom and fair virtue
    Than this pure soul shall be: all princely graces,
    That mould up such a mighty piece as this is,
    With all the virtues that attend the good,
    Shall still be doubled on her: truth shall nurse her,
    Holy and heavenly thoughts still counsel her:
    She shall be loved and fear'd: her own shall bless her;
    Her foes shake like a field of beaten corn,
    And hang their heads with sorrow: good grows with her:
    In her days every man shall eat in safety,
    Under his own vine, what he plants; and sing
    The merry songs of peace to all his neighbours:
    God shall be truly known; and those about her
    From her shall read the perfect ways of honour,
    And by those claim their greatness, not by blood.
    Nor shall this peace sleep with her: but as when
    The bird of wonder dies, the maiden phoenix,
    Her ashes new create another heir,
    As great in admiration as herself;
    So shall she leave her blessedness to one,
    When heaven shall call her from this cloud of darkness,
    Who from the sacred ashes of her honour
    Shall star-like rise, as great in fame as she was,
    And so stand fix'd: peace, plenty, love, truth, terror,
    That were the servants to this chosen infant,
    Shall then be his, and like a vine grow to him:
    Wherever the bright sun of heaven shall shine,
    His honour and the greatness of his name
    Shall be, and make new nations: he shall flourish,
    And, like a mountain cedar, reach his branches
    To all the plains about him: our children's children
    Shall see this, and bless heaven.
  • Henry VIII. My noble gossips, ye have been too prodigal:
    I thank ye heartily; so shall this lady,
    When she has so much English.

    Archbishop Cranmer. Let me speak, sir,
    For heaven now bids me; and the words I utter
    Let none think flattery, for they'll find 'em truth.
    This royal infant--heaven still move about her!--
    Though in her cradle, yet now promises
    Upon this land a thousand thousand blessings,
    Which time shall bring to ripeness: she shall be--
    But few now living can behold that goodness--
    A pattern to all princes living with her,
    And all that shall succeed: Saba was never
    More covetous of wisdom and fair virtue
    Than this pure soul shall be: all princely graces,
    That mould up such a mighty piece as this is,
    With all the virtues that attend the good,
    Shall still be doubled on her: truth shall nurse her,
    Holy and heavenly thoughts still counsel her:
    She shall be loved and fear'd: her own shall bless her;
    Her foes shake like a field of beaten corn,
    And hang their heads with sorrow: good grows with her:
    In her days every man shall eat in safety,
    Under his own vine, what he plants; and sing
    The merry songs of peace to all his neighbours:
    God shall be truly known; and those about her
    From her shall read the perfect ways of honour,
    And by those claim their greatness, not by blood.
    Nor shall this peace sleep with her: but as when
    The bird of wonder dies, the maiden phoenix,
    Her ashes new create another heir,
    As great in admiration as herself;
    So shall she leave her blessedness to one,
    When heaven shall call her from this cloud of darkness,
    Who from the sacred ashes of her honour
    Shall star-like rise, as great in fame as she was,
    And so stand fix'd: peace, plenty, love, truth, terror,
    That were the servants to this chosen infant,
    Shall then be his, and like a vine grow to him:
    Wherever the bright sun of heaven shall shine,
    His honour and the greatness of his name
    Shall be, and make new nations: he shall flourish,
    And, like a mountain cedar, reach his branches
    To all the plains about him: our children's children
    Shall see this, and bless heaven.

21 V / 5
  • She shall be, to the happiness of England,
    An aged princess; many days shall...
  • She shall be, to the happiness of England,
    An aged princess; many days shall see her,
    And yet no day without a deed to crown it.
    Would I had known no more! but she must die,
    She must, the saints must have her; yet a virgin,
    A most unspotted lily shall she pass
    To the ground, and all the world shall mourn her.
  • Henry VIII. Thou speakest wonders.

    Archbishop Cranmer. She shall be, to the happiness of England,
    An aged princess; many days shall see her,
    And yet no day without a deed to crown it.
    Would I had known no more! but she must die,
    She must, the saints must have her; yet a virgin,
    A most unspotted lily shall she pass
    To the ground, and all the world shall mourn her.

© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.

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© Copyright 2017-2022 Shakespeare Network - Maximianno Cobra - All rights reserved.